Wales v Italy: The Preview

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Comeback: Wales hooker Matthew Rees makes his first appearance of the 2012 Six Nations against ItalyBy Owain Jones, Rugby World EditorOn paper, and in virtually every alehouse in the principality, Wales are nailed-on favourites to overcome an Italian side seemingly bereft of confidence, belief and conviction. This is despite the Azzurri showing glimpses of their undoubted potential against France and England, where they were a few missed kicks away from victory. Sadly in this fixture, the history books point against an Azzurri win. They have been victorious in only eight of their 63 Six Nations fixtures and if Jacques Brunel can pull off the Italian job in Cardiff, it will rate as a seismic shock to equal to their 22-21 win over France 12 months ago. For Wales, not even the withdrawal of the inspirational captain Sam Warburton has dampened expectations of a straightforward win, not that you’d hear Warren Gatland say as much. The watchword will be patience. Wales know they’ll be in a dogfight early on but also know that they are cryogenically strengthened to kick on when opponents are flailing. In the last quarter they will look to use their big strike runners to break down a tiring Italian side and rack up the points before a Grand Slam shot.Slam pressure?The party line emanating from the Wales camp this week is that the men in red are ‘relishing the pressure’. Certainly the semi-final adventure at the World Cup will have done them no harm in stiffening their resolve for what is still a very young, but seasoned squad. You can expect the Wales, and Lions front row of Gethin Jenkins, Matthew Rees and Adam Jones be more than a match for Leonardo Ghiraldini and Andrea Lo Cicero upfront, while in the backrow Dan Lydiate, Toby Faletau and Justin Tipuric will bring ballast and no little brio to the party and look to stop the incomparable Sergio Parisse exerting too much of an influence on proceedings.Testing time: Fly-half Rhys PriestlandWelsh firepowerOut wide, the much feted Welsh backs will be expected to bulldoze and bedazzle an expectant Millennium Stadium crowd, but Warren Gatland will have been drumming in the need to do the basics right and be precise, before they even think of showcasing their skills. Offensively they were not at their devastating best against England but what the last 12 months has shown us is that when certain members of the squad are not firing – take Rhys Priestland a fortnight ago – another player steps up with a moment of magic, as Scott Williams did against England. With even Jamie Roberts admitting to pressure for his place, expect the backline to be putting down a marker for inclusion in a potential Grand Slam finale, none more than George North who becomes the first international player ever to gain 20 caps before his 20th birthday. For their part, Italy, who have shaken and stirred their starting line-up with seven changes, will look for a timely lift from 85-cap Mirco Bergamasco on the wing. If Mirco can improve on the wayward kicking of Tobias Botes, Italy will at least have a fighting chance.Azzurri braced NOT FOR FEATURED Italy have never won at the Millennium Stadium, the closest they came was in the 18-18 draw in 2006. Jacques Brunel knows he will have to elicit a Herculean performance from his squad to have any hope of an unlikely victory. The Italian’s will have to be clinical with every scoring opportunity, something they have been unable to do consistently for some time, to emerge victorious. Despite Brunel trying to get his charges to play with more width, you can expect Italy to try to gain parity at the set piece, gain decent field position and force penalties to use boot of Bergamasco to keep the scoreboard ticking over. As for crossing the whitewash Andrea Masi and Gonzalo Canale will be asked to punch holes in a hitherto rock solid Welsh defence and give the travelling support something to cheer about.Captain fantastic: Italy’s Sergio ParisseVerdict: Wales simply have too much power for a limited Italian side, so I’m going for a 28-12 win to set-up a Grand Slam final weekend.WALES: Leigh Halfpenny, Alex Cuthbert, Jonathan Davies, Jamie Roberts, George North, Rhys Priestland, Mike Phillips, Gethin Jenkins (capt), Matthew Rees, Adam Jones, Alun Wyn Jones, Ian Evans, Dan Lydiate, Justin Tipuric, Toby FaletauReplacements: Ken Owens, Paul James, Luke Charteris, Ryan Jones, Rhys Webb, James Hook, Scott WilliamsItaly: Andrea Masi; Luke McLean, Gonzalo Canale, Alberto Sgarbi, Mirco Bergamasco, Kris Burton, Fabio Semenzato, Andrea Lo Cicero, Leonardo Ghiraldini, Lorenzo Cittadini, Quintin Geldenhuys, Cornelius van Zyl, Alessandro Zanni, Simone Favaro, Sergio Parisse (capt) Replacements: Tommaso D’Apice, Fabio Staibano, Marco Bortolami, Robert Barbieri, Tobias Botes, Tommaso Benvenuti, Giulio ToniolattiReferee: George Clancy (Ireland)last_img read more

Lions 2013: The XV after the 6 Nations

first_imgToby Faletau (Wales)Nods could come in for Johnnie Beattie, but with Jamie Heaslip’s crown slipping as Ireland toiled, the Welshman has quietly and efficiently cornered the market in effective No 8 play. He picks, he carries, he wrecks, he tackles. Repeat but he has quick feet and a deftness. The only real option right now. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS On-form and working his mojo (steady, ladies) Phillips has risen to the occasion (seriously, steady!). There are other nines who are worth considering –Ben Youngs runs well, even if he went missing against Wales, and Greig Laidlaw is an impressive kicker – but Phillips is a man for the big occasion, and it doesn’t get much bigger than the Lions.Cian Healy (Ireland)‘Church’ Healy was not exactly saintly in this tournament, but his scrummaging, particularly against England, was sound. He likes to carry, but works well across the board. Gethin Jenkins has grown into the tournament, improving with every game, and Ryan Grant has made sure his name is remembered, but Healy has all-round quality. He just needs to be told to channel his aggression before being let loose on the Aussies.Richard Hibbard (Wales)Arguably the surprise package of the tournament, Hibbard has backed up fine Ospreys form and translating that into masterful Welsh performances. Heaven only knows what he will look like should the sun gets at his bleach-bright barnet, but he has certainly outshone all the other hookers. The phrase, ‘disregard for his own safety’ has been coined for players like Hibbard.Adam Jones (Wales)There is a warning that comes with the worship of false idols, but in Adam Jones there is nothing false about him. He showed that much against the English with a demonstration of wily nous and raw power to usurp understudy, Dan Cole.Undoubtedly the man to lead the scrum against the Wallabies.Happy cart-horse: Geoff ParlingAlun Wyn Jones (Wales)Reinstated, revived and relied upon to out-snarl all-comers, Alun Wyn has done remarkably well considering he was not involved at the start of the 6 Nations. His Ospreys partner in crime Ian Evans also deserves a doff of the cap for his efforts and Joe Launchbury has had a mightily productive first tournament, but the Osprey captain is a cut above.Geoff Parling (England)He and Donnacha Ryan take some separating as masters of the lineout. Both just do the job without fuss, being the happy cart horses that allow their team to play. Parling just offers that little bit more in the loose, making 17 tackles against Wales and carrying strongly.Chris Robshaw (England)The England captain has had a inspirational tournament and although his side fell short he has to take plaudits in Cardiff. At blindside he could play his normal game without too much fuss, and really the decision is whether or not it is now Sam Warburton’s shirt to lose. There are other candidates, Dan Lydiate needs a speedy return to fitness and Tom Wood has impressed but the position is an area of strength for Britain and Ireland.Justin Tipuric (Wales)It is no longer hype that surrounds Tipuric. He has injected pace and precision whenever introduced and when it counted he helped create championship winning moments. In Australia, it’s horses for course and on the hard grounds, it’s difficult to see anyone else with 7 on their back. Stand-out scrum-half: Mike Phillips led the way for Wales as they retained their RBS 6 Nations titleBy Alan DymockALL GOOD things come to those who wait and the final round of the 6 Nations was certainly something worth the wait after a dreary, stodgy middle section that was punctuated by penalties and a disturbing lack of tries.Like all the best nights out, though, we are now colouring in from memory the best bits of the Championship, trying to put names to faces and performances to the elite. We have considered everything we have seen, good and bad, and to a fan everyone has picked their own Lions XV.Here is our Lions XV, based on what we saw in the Championship:Leigh Halfpenny (Wales)We are often told nothing in life is certain except death and taxes. However, in the last few months the sight of wee ‘HP’ claiming high balls, running into open space and slotting kicks has become as near to a certainty as you get in Championship rugby. As consistent as he is entertaining.Two thumbs up: Cuthbert has been lethalAlex Cuthbert (Wales)A brace against England is impressive, but Cuthbert already had two tries in the competition and has been dotting down like an over-officious administrator. When a thoroughbred like this is on a roll like this you do what you can to clear the way.Brian O’Driscoll (Ireland)He was petulant and frustrated in his last outing against Italy, and could be punished beyond his yellow card after a stamp on Simone Favaro. He also faded a little bit through the competition, but even after lacerations and concussions and family births and hideous headband wrapping, the totemic centre has shown enough guile, flicks and warrior-like attitude to suggest that he could be of use to Warren Gatland.A sentimental choice? Perhaps, but he is a leader, respected by all.Matt Scott (Scotland)Both England midfielders had glimpses of excellence, but Manu Tuilagi coughed up ball when the pressure was on and Billy Twelvetrees was not used when a Slam was on the horizon. Jonathan Davies was good but is an outside centre and really Jamie Roberts will be in the driving seat from the off but dark horse Matt Scott must get some accolades.The Edinburgh man was consistent throughout the championship and showed a deftness that allowed a mercurial back-three to strut their stuff, when the occasion presented itself. He could be a facilitator if Gatland wanted crash and bang at outside centre.George North (Wales)We all know what North offers. He just draws too many defenders to be left out, topping the charts with four clean line breaks and 14 defenders beaten. Tim Visser may be worth a mention, but if Visser was to tour he is likely to be a free-running foil for the gargantuan Scarlet.Fans favourite already: Owen Farrell(-ish)Owen Farrell (England)With Sexton now having to prove himself in the Amlin Cup in order to show that he is able to play at an intensity before the tour, England’s tyro at 10 Farrell is in the box seat.Of course he would be pushed all the way by Dan Biggar, who had an increasingly influential 6 Nations, but there is something of the TMA (Test Match Animal) about Farrell Jr.Mind you, outside of the Championship there is still the persistent brilliance of Jonny Wilkinson…Mike Phillips (Wales) CARDIFF, WALES – MARCH 16: An England fan wearing an Owen Farrell mask cheers on his team during the RBS Six Nations match between Wales and England at Millennium Stadium on March 16, 2013 in Cardiff, Wales. (Photo by David Rogers – RFU/The RFU Collection via Getty Images) last_img read more

Italy Women’s Six Nations Squad 2021 – Ireland 25-5 Italy

first_imgAnother pouncing try! Great pick up and break from Meg Jones before her offload to @vickyfleetwood to finish it off. @EnglandRugby are two tries up in Parma at half-time. #WomensSixNations #ITAvENG pic.twitter.com/T3zshianAP— Women’s Six Nations (@Womens6Nations) April 10, 2021They trailed 17-3 at the break – a Michela Sillari penalty all they could register – and the visitors ran in seven tries in the second half as the energy the Italians were expending defensively (they made twice as many tackles as England) started to take its toll. Expand Italy Women’s Six Nations Squad 2021Italy lost 25-5 to Ireland in their final Women’s Six Nations match to finish fourth in the 2021 championship overall.They were outscored four tries to one in Dublin, with hooker Melissa Bettoni providing their only points. Women’s Six Nations Team Guide 2021 Italy Women’s Six Nations Fixtures 2021(All kick-off times are UK & Ireland time)Round TwoSat 10 April Italy 3-67 EnglandRound ThreeSat 17 April Scotland 20-41 ItalyFinalsSat 24 April Ireland 25-5 ItalyDon’t miss a game with this Women’s Six Nations TV coverage guide. All you need to know about the countries… Italy captain Giada Franco’s World Cup ambitions Expand LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Captain Fantastic! @Federugby captain Manuela Furlan finishes off a perfect attack from the Azzuri. #WomensSixNations #SCOvITA pic.twitter.com/idy3CzfOqZ— Women’s Six Nations (@Womens6Nations) April 17, 2021A Scotland try and penalty reduced the Italians’ lead, but they reasserted themselves just before the break. Italy worked through the phases and then Ilaria Arrighetti powered over the line to give her side a 19-10 lead at the break.Then they started the second period as they ended the first, with another try. Rigoni broke through, Sara Barattin took play into the 22 and a couple of phases later Vittoria Ostuni Minuzzi touched down in the corner for the bonus-point score.Furlan and Rigoni then both doubled their individual try tallies midway through the half before the captain added a final flourish. Italy spread the ball wide from a dominant scrum in the last minute and Furlan was there to go over for her third. New format for 2021 Women’s Six Nations The back-row assesses her country’s progress and looks… Women’s Six Nations Team Guide 2021center_img Collapse The Azzurre lose to Ireland in the third-place play-off New format for 2021 Women’s Six Nations Alyssa D’Inca (23 Mar 2002/Arredissima Villorba/Centre/Scrum-half)Manuela Furlan (30 Jun 1988/Arredissima Villorba/Full-back)Veronica Madia (16 Jan 1995/Rugby Colorno/Fly-half)Maria Magatti (21 Aug 1992/CUS Milano/Wing)Benedetta Mancini (23 May 1995/Unione R Capitolina/Wing)Aura Muzzo (12 Apr 1997/Arredissima Villorba/Centre)Vittoria Ostuni Minuzzi (6 Dec 2001/Valsugana Rugby Padova/Wing)Laura Paganni (24 Feb 1999/CUS Milano/Fly-half)Beatrice Rigoni (1 Aug 1995/Valsugana Rugby Padova/Centre)Sofia Rolfi (24 Oct 2001/Rugby Colorno/Wing)Michela Sillari (23 Feb 1993/Valsugana Rugby Padova/Centre)Sofia Stefan (12 May 1992/Valsugana Rugby Padova/Wing)ForwardsIlaria Arrighetti (2 Mar 1993/Stade Rennais/Back-row)Melissa Bettoni (7 May 1991/Stade Rennais/Hooker)Lucia Cammarano (27 Jul 1992/Rugby Belve Neroverdi/Hooker)Giordana Duca (9 Sep 1992/Valsugana Rugby Padova/Lock)Valeria Fedrighi (5 Sep 1992/Toulouse/Lock)Giada Franco (11 Jul 1996/Rugby Colorno/Back-row)Lucia Gai (3 May 1991/Valsugana Rugby Padova/Prop)Elisa Giordano (1 Nov 1990/Valsugana Rugby Padova/Back-row)Isabella Locatelli (23 Oct 1994/Rugby Monza 1949/Back-row)Gaia Maris (5 Dec 2001Valsugana Rugby Padova/Hooker)Francesca Sberna (6 Dec 1992/Calvisano/Back-row)Sara Seye (26 Aug 2000/Kawasaki Robot Calvisano/Prop)Francesca Sgorbini (7 Jan 2001/ASM Romagnat/Back-row)Sara Tounesi (19 Jul 1995/ASM Romagnat/Prop)Silvia Turani (6 Jul 1995/FC Grenoble/Prop)Beatrice Veronese (11 Mar 1996/Valsugana Rugby Padova/Back-row)MORE ON THE WOMEN’S SIX NATIONS The pass from Sara Barattin and @m_fur_88 is over for her second of the evening.Another well worked try from @Federugby #WomensSixNations #SCOvITA pic.twitter.com/2h01HtYkWY— Women’s Six Nations (@Womens6Nations) April 17, 2021Italy will now face Ireland in the third-place play-off next Saturday – and one area they will want to improve for that final fixture is their discipline having conceded twice as many penalties as Scotland in Glasgow.Italy team to play Scotland – Saturday 17 AprilVittoria Ostuni Minuzzi; Manuela Furlan, Michela Sillari, Beatrice Rigoni, Maria Magatti; Veronica Madia, Sara Barattin; Erika Skofca, Melissa Bettoni, Lucia Gai, Valeria Fedrighi, Giodana Duca, Ilaria Arrighetti, Francesca Sgorbini, Elisa Giordano.Replacements: Lucia Cammarano, Gaia Maris, Michela Merlo, Sarah Tounesi, Isabella Locatelli, Beatrice Veronese, Sofia Stefan, Aura Muzzo.Italy 3-67 EnglandItaly suffered a 67-3 defeat by England in their opening match of the 2021 Women’s Six Nations in Parma.The Azzurre started the game strongly, dominating the opening half in terms of possession and territory, but they couldn’t make it count on the scoreboard.They put together impressive phase play and made ground, but couldn’t get over the line – and England were quick to capitalise on errors.Emily Scarratt scored the first try when pouncing on a loose pass and Meg Jones set up the second when the ball ricocheted off an Italian player into her arms. 151 tackles made by Italy so far! HUGE shift!#WomensSixNations #ITAvENG— Women’s Six Nations (@Womens6Nations) April 10, 2021Italy travel to Scotland next weekend and will be aiming for a victory to secure second spot in Pool A.Italy team to play England – Saturday 10 AprilManuela Furlan; Aura Muzzo, Michela Sillari, Beatrice Rigoni, Maria Magatti; Veronica Madia, Sara Barattin; Erika Skofca, Lucia Cammarano, Lucia Gai, Valeria Fedrighi, Giodana Duca, Ilaria Arrighetti, Giada Franco, Elisa Giordano.Replacements: Melissa Bettoni, Gaia Maris, Sara Tounesi, Isabella Locatelli, Beatrice Veronese, Francesca Sgorbini, Sofia Stefan, Alyssa D’Inca.Italy Women’s Six Nations squadAndrea Di Giandomenico has named a 30-player squad for this year’s Women’s Six Nations.As well as experienced backs like captain Manuela Furlan (75 caps) and scrum-half Sara Barattin (95 caps), the squad features four uncapped players in Alyssa D’Inca, Gaia Maris, Sofia Rolfi and Sara Seye.Italy host England in their first pool match before travelling to Scotland for their second, then they will play the team ranked in the equivalent position in Pool A, one of France, Ireland or Wales, on ‘finals day’.Italy Women’s Six Nations Squad 2021Backs(DoB/Club/Position)Sara Barattin (11 Sep 1986/Arredissima Villorbas/Scrum-half)Beatrice Capomaggi (29 Apr 1997/Arredissima Villorba/Centre) Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Manuela Furlan scores the second of her three tries against Scotland (Inpho) This year’s championship will take place in April… Italy captain Giada Franco’s World Cup ambitions HIGHLIGHTS: Watch the best action from Ireland’s victory over Italy in the 3rd place playoff!#IREvITA #WomensSixNations pic.twitter.com/x2NDzTbR8k— Women’s Six Nations (@Womens6Nations) April 24, 2021Italy team to play Ireland – Saturday 24 AprilVittoria Ostuni Minuzzi; Manuela Furlan, Michela Sillari, Beatrice Rigoni, Maria Magatti; Veronica Madia, Sara Barratin; Erika Skofca, Melissa Bettoni, Lucia Gai, Valeria Fedrighi, Giodana Duca, Ilaria Arrighetti, Francesca Sgorbini, Elisa Giordano.Replacements: Lucia Cammarano, Gaia Maris, Michela Merlo, Sarah Tounesi, Isabella Locatelli, Beatrice Veronese, Sofia Stefan, Aura Muzzo.Scotland 20-41 ItalyManuela Furlan scored a hat-trick as Italy secured second spot in Pool A of the Women’s Six Nations with a 41-20 victory over Scotland in Glasgow.Italy started well, scoring two tries in the opening ten minutes. First centre Beatrice Rigoni crossed following slick passing from a scrum in Scotland’s 22 and then skipper Furlan burst clear down the wing after the hosts lost a lineout.last_img read more

St. Alban’s, D.C., honored among ‘interfaith engaged’ leaders

first_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Pittsburgh, PA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI By ENInews staffPosted Dec 8, 2011 Rector Albany, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Press Release Press Release Service Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Bath, NC Rector Tampa, FL An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 center_img Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Martinsville, VA [Ecumenical News International] Five congregations demonstrating a special enthusiasm and exemplary work for interfaith relations have been named “model interfaith engaged congregations” by the National Council of Churches (NCC), according to a news release.In June, the NCC’s Interfaith Relations Commission asked for nominations from its member communions and other communities affiliated with the Council of congregations that “have something important to share about interfaith engagement.”As a result of the national initiative, says the release, the Commission is honoring Boston Avenue United Methodist Church in Tulsa, Oklahoma; Community Christian Church, Disciples of Christ in Tempe, Arizona; Episcopal Tri-Faith Ministries in Omaha, Nebraska; First Christian Church, Disciples of Christ, in Eugene, Oregon; and St. Alban’s Episcopal Church in Washington, D.C.Each congregation recognized for its engagement in interfaith relations will in turn serve as a mentor for other congregations seeking to enhance their work in this area.“These recognitions advance congregational mission and health by empowering congregations to share their story with denominational partners, local media, and potential funders,” said Dr. Antonios Kireopoulos, NCC associate general secretary, Faith & Order and Interfaith Relations.The initiative, which will become an annual event, is also aimed at “encouraging creative interfaith engagement through inclusion of interfaith content in curricula, preaching, theology, vision and mission, and budget; and equipping leaders to affirm and celebrate all who have contributed to the recognition and providing an impetus for more people get involved,” according to Kireopoulos. Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Belleville, IL Featured Events Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Ecumenical & Interreligious Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Tags Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York St. Alban’s, D.C., honored among ‘interfaith engaged’ leaders Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AKlast_img read more

Maryland bishop suffragan faces numerous charges in fatal accident

first_img January 27, 2015 at 10:27 pm Where can I find Caroline’s + sermon referred to, above. Could someone please send me a link? Larry Norton says: Fr. E. Perren Hayes says: Baltimore City State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby Jan. 9 announces the initial charges against Diocese of Maryland Bishop Suffragan Heather Cook in the Dec. 27 fatal accident that killed a bicyclist. Standing with her are Lt. Colonel Melissa Hyatt and Don Giblin, chief of homicide for the State’s Attorney’s Office. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENSEditor’s note: This story was updated at 6:13 p.m. Jan. 9.[Episcopal News Service – Baltimore, Maryland] Episcopal Diocese of Maryland Bishop Suffragan Heather Cook surrendered to Baltimore law enforcement hours after she was charged Jan. 9 with eight offenses for allegedly causing a fatal car accident in which she temporarily left the scene after striking and killing a bicyclist.Cook turned herself in to police mid-Friday afternoon and was being processed at Central Booking, police told The Baltimore Sun. A court commissioner was expected to determine her bail in the evening, a judiciary spokeswoman said, the Sun reported.Earlier in the day, Baltimore City State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby said at a news conference that charges had been filed in district court accusing Cook of four criminal charges. They include negligent manslaughter by vehicle (maximum penalty 10 years and/or $5,000 fine), criminal negligent manslaughter by vehicle (three years and/or $5,000 fine), negligently driving under the influence resulting in a homicide (five years and/or $5,000 fine) and negligent homicide involving an auto or boat while impaired (three years and/or $5,000 fine).Cook also faces traffic charges of failing to remain at an accident resulting in death, failing to remain at the scene of an accident resulting in bodily injury, using a text messaging device while driving causing an accident with death or serious injury, and driving under the influence of alcohol.Media representatives crowd the small news conference room in the offices of Baltimore City State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby Jan. 9. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENSMosby said a breathalyzer test administered to Cook after the accident showed the bishop had a blood alcohol content of .22 percent. The legal limit in Maryland is .08 percent.Thomas Palermo, 41, the married father of two young children, was pronounced dead on the afternoon of Dec. 27 at a hospital near the accident scene. He died from head injuries suffered in the accident.Mosby reminded those at the news conference that Cook is presumed innocent until and unless she is found guilty beyond a reasonable doubt.When Mosby met with the Palermo family Jan. 8, she said she “assured them that we’re going to pursue justice.”The state’s attorney outlined the accident, citing the statement of probable cause that was filed in court. She said both Palermo and Cook were traveling southbound on Roland Avenue with Palermo in the bike lane and Cook in the traffic lane. Cook, who was texting while driving at the time, veered off to the right and into the bike lane, striking Palermo from the rear. The collision caused Palermo to strike the hood and windshield of Cook’s 2001 Subaru, Mosby said. He was thrown to the right-hand side before coming to a final rest against the curb.She said the statement of probable cause alleges that Cook did not stop at the scene of the accident, and continued south on Roland. Roughly 30 minutes later she drove past the scene, heading northbound on Roland, but continued past the scene northbound to her residence, according to Mosby. The timeline in the statement of probable cause alleges that Cook was gone from the scene for a longer period of time than what was reported in earlier news accounts.Cook left that residence shortly after her arrival there and returned to the scene. Mosby said that Cook then was taken from the scene to a police station by members of the Baltimore Police Department where she was given a breathalyzer test which resulted in the .22 reading.Mosby said that the case will be presented to a grand jury scheduled to be impaneled on Jan. 12. The jury could drop some of the charges and/or add others.Mosby, 34, was acting on her first full day as Baltimore City State’s Attorney, having been sworn into office the day before.Just after Mosby concluded her news conference, Diocese of Maryland Bishop Eugene Sutton released a statement saying in part: “Please know that we are deeply heartbroken over this, and we cry for the Palermo family, our sister Heather and all in the community who are hurting.”“Our Lord Jesus would be a healing presence in the midst of this tragic situation, and we are seeking ways to walk in his footsteps in the days and months ahead,” he said. “As we do so we are truly being the church, and we will always be guided by our core Christian values of personal accountability, compassion and respect for the rule of law.”Neva Rae Fox, Episcopal Church public affairs officer, also issued a statement acknowledging the charges and saying “as this is a legal matter, we will not comment on the charges or the proceedings that will follow.”“Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori maintains a pastoral and canonical relationship with Bishop Cook,” Fox said. “As a result, Cook will not be permitted to exercise her ordained ministry in the foreseeable future.”Sutton had placed Cook on administrative leave shortly after the accident and The Episcopal Church’s disciplinary processes have been put in motion. Title IV of the Canons of The Episcopal Church governs ecclesiastical discipline of clergy members. Canon 17 of Title IV outlines the disciplinary process of bishops. Title IV requires confidentiality at this point in the process.Cook became the diocese’s first female bishop when she was ordained and consecrated Sept. 6. Cook’s biography is here on the diocesan website.The Dec. 27 fatal accident brought to light a 2010 traffic incident in which Cook was arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol and for marijuana possession. Cook pleaded guilty to drunken driving in that incident, and the prosecution of marijuana possession charge was dropped. A judge sentenced her on Oct. 25, 2010, to pay a $300 fine and supervised probation. Court records available online do not note the length or conditions of Cook’s probation.A Dec. 30 statement on the diocesan website said that during the search process that resulted in Cook being elected suffragan in 2014 she had “fully disclosed” the 2010 arrest for which she received “probation before judgment” from the court. “After extensive discussion and discernment about the incident, and after further investigation, including extensive background check and psychological investigation, it was determined that this one mistake should not bar her for consideration as a leader,” the statement said.The convention that elected Cook on May 2, 2014, however, was not told about the 2010 arrest, Sharon Tillman, the diocese’s director of communications, confirmed to ENS Jan. 9.Previous ENS coverage of the accident is here.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Comments (38) Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL January 9, 2015 at 6:18 pm Why is she still a bishop? Do you recall a few years ago that right after the election of the first woman to head the powerful German Evangelical Church she was stopped by police for a DUI. It took about two days for her to resign her office, on a par with that of the primate of the US Episcopal Church. As for forgiveness etc. outweighing her previous DUI in the process of making her bishop. I would call that complicit and negligent. People who drink drink. I drink. People who drink and drive are people who will continue to do that. Again what is it about our Church rules that allow her to remain a bishop while this mess tarnishes the whole church. Is the episcopacy in denial? Why is this woman still a bishop? Featured Jobs & Calls January 28, 2015 at 7:30 pm I totally agree. Alcoholism is a physiological, primary and complex Disease, and the AMA stated in the early sixties that it “was the most complex Disease known.” It is progressive and fatal if not treated. Even with a top treatment inpatient program and excellent follow-up outpatient treatment and meetings-meetings-meetings, the fatality rate is still too high. It is an insidious baffling, cunning Disease and it is a family disease and the whole family needs treatment also. Alcoholics are master mainpulators and those people that are close to the Alcoholic need education and treatment also. It’s a treatable Disease and shame and guilt need to be out the picture. Heather Cook’s dad went to rehab several times before achieving sobriety. I wish in 2015 we could we know a lot about Alcoholsm: ie. AA.Al-anon, Alateen, and help is available. I read today that the Diocese of Maryland sent a letter to Bishop Cook requesting her resignation as Bishop Suffragan and I’m very glad to see that done. She is nowhere ready to do anything in my opinion except focus on recovery, maybe for several years before being able to take on a job. I was sorry to see she was bailed out to the tune of $2l5,000.00 though. Money misspent. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books January 9, 2015 at 8:28 pm My sense is all this is an underlying symptom of why the appeal of the organized church at large and the way it conducts itself is reflected in people’s diminished intertest in it. The deeper question is how and why this person ultimtely was concecrated bishop to begin with! An expanded background check would have not only revealed the history of her involvement with the law but also her apparent lack of honest transparency, a significant piece of assessing Cook’s ability to provide pastroal care. Sadly, and for whatever reason, it didn’t take her very long to show her true self. Where was the integrity and accountabilty of those involved in the search process? As for Cook remaining in office? The PB by obligation of her office has the pastoral responsibility to not only evaluate how Cook’s actions have effected and will continue to impact the community she apparently believed she was called to serve but moreover that will strongly be encouraged Cook to seek the help she obviiously needs. Ordination doesn’t make a person but hopefully should reveal who a person authetically is! Peace and Blessings Steven Ford says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC John C. Kimbrough says: January 10, 2015 at 11:19 am In the Episcopal Church — as in the Roman Catholic and Orthodox Churches — ordination as deacon, priest or bishop within the one sacrament of Ordination — is, like baptism, indelible. Once ordained, a basic change has come to the recipient — as is true of Baptism, the Eucharist and other sacraments. (See the BCP1979 Liturgies and the Catechism) Sacraments are not an aid to living a “better” life (although they are); they are a sign that the “sacramentalized” person is now different by personal choice. Sin can no longer change our relationship with God; but rather an indication of the point where we need more prayerful care and practice (like an athlete) in that area.The church cannot “revoke” the “fact” of ordination. But the Church CAN remove the “authority to act” granted “by the church” to individuals who have been canonically ordained. This has already happened on a temporary basis. Now “the church” follows the “procedures-established” in canon law in regard to this particular situation. Testimony and trial may be needed to be sure that “authority to act” is not permanently/temporarily removed without serious reason. When that happens, then the decision is completed: by absolute; or temporary; or no; by “inhibition of authority to act.”This process has nothing to do with secular law — which proceeds to do similar things as they affect an accused person in any societal matter.Having said this, I also add my personal attitude: The accused bishop withheld nothing (apparently) from the committee to elect a bishop. They knew of her arrest and other lapses and alcohol issues. If fault (as we Americans love to locate) is to be had, one needs to see and interview the committee to elect a bishop to understand why these issues — very important in my mind — were not told to the electors.I pray for Thomas Palermo and his family daily — such a horrible accident from such a person should never have happened.Perren Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET January 27, 2015 at 11:12 am I meant to say, “Regarding the vetting process, I cannot speak to it.” TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Bath, NC January 10, 2015 at 10:51 am And accountability. When you know someone is not trustworthy (or dealing with significant issues in this case) why would anyone put them in a place of heightened responsibility? Forgiveness is our mandate, absolutely, AND that should never preclude accountability. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC John C. Kimbrough says: Charlie Linebarger says: Maryland bishop suffragan faces numerous charges in fatal accident Vehicular manslaughter, driving under the influence, texting among the charges Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 January 19, 2015 at 9:24 am The problem for me is that the “church” followed procedures and elected this person who based on her actions (leaving an critically injured man by the side of the road and not publicly taking responsibility for her actions) does not really believe enough of what she preached to be able to practice it. Given that, how can I know that ANY church leader really believes what they preach. Her actions have harmed not just the Palermo family, herself, and the Maryland Diocese, but has harmed many people’s faith most church leaders. Jane Maxwell says: Featured Events Patrick McQuarter says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 John C. Kimbrough says: Comments are closed. Michael Vogt says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ January 11, 2015 at 6:33 pm Steve Skardon nailed it! Thanks -=- Rector Collierville, TN January 9, 2015 at 9:53 pm “Be alert and of sober mind” – 1 Peter 5:8 Selena Smith says: January 11, 2015 at 4:37 pm This is an unimaginable tragedy for the family of Thomas Palermo. However, I have trouble seeing this as just a “tragedy” for the Church. It is much more than that. Last year someone in the Diocese of Maryland’s search process apparently decided that the delegates to convention didn’t need to know about Bishop Cook’s legal entanglements and challenges with substance abuse. Consequently, she was elected, that election was consented to by the wider Church… and a time bomb was placed in the highest echelons of our institutional leadership. There is very real culpability here. We need to be careful not indulge in the kind of delusional thinking that infected the Catholic Church in its handling of priests accused of sexual abuse. According to Mary Frances’ article, the bishop’s history was intentionally covered up by the Diocese with her knowledge, and she was allowed to stand for election, while those in the know closed their eyes and crossed their fingers. Yes, the Church has a disciplinary process and it is moving forward. However, that takes time, and as long as there is even the slightest possibility that Bishop Cook will continue as a bishop, even on administrative leave, it will be very difficult for healing or forgiveness to even begin. Guilty until proven innocent is a fundamental tenant of our legal system, not institutional common sense. The process by which Bishop Cook was elected was intentionally distorted, and now the resulting cover up has cost a 41-year-old husband and father of two his life. We are required by Christ to hold out love and compassion for Heather Cook and her family. However, that does not mean we must accept the grievous error made by the Diocese of Maryland that led to this loss of life. If Bishop Cook insists on remaining a bishop in that Diocese a minute longer, Bishop Sutton and his Standing Committee need to insist on her resignation. January 9, 2015 at 8:00 pm This situation again reiterates that issues with alcohol and drug usage is not defined by class, gender, social standing, or holy calling. We are so blessed to have an active recovery ministry within our church and help is available to all-clergy, laity, seeker. It is no secret that addictive illness is a condition marked by shame and secrecy, and perhaps this is no more evident when it comes to light in such a public and tragic way. We especially want to look the other way when we see a clergy member “in trouble”, because of the stigma attached, or mistakenly thinking its not our place to intervene. Please, please, please contact someone from Recovery Ministries of the Episcopal Church in your diocese if you see someone in trouble. There of course are no guarantees that a person will seek help when confronted with their addiction issues, or maintain their sobriety, but it is worth the chance if it possibly can prevent such a sad event from occurring. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY John D. Ruff says: David Koskela says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR January 9, 2015 at 9:48 pm If she had any integrity at all, she would resign as a bishop and a priest. Covering up her previous arrest alone is a blot on those in the diocese who knew of it and chose to withhold that information from the electors. None of us is perfect, but some of us have varying degrees of integrity. It would appear that neither this woman nor those who covered up for her had much integrity. Our thoughts and prayers go out to the family of the man she killed. Yes, killed. Ann Tucker says: January 11, 2015 at 5:39 pm The fact that information regarding Bp. Cook’s prior arrest was withheld from the Convention that elected her strongly suggests that the election process was rigged in her favor. One of the other candidates likely would have been elected if this shocking information had been disclosed to the electors. Why has no one expressed concern about the obvious unfairness to the other candidates? January 9, 2015 at 9:44 pm It is both sad and disturbing……The points that you have made Noreen are correct, wise and righteous…..God bless you for your wisdom and your ability to articulate these thoughts so well……. Grace Cangialosi says: January 9, 2015 at 11:36 pm These hard-hitting reports by The Reverand Mary Frances Schjonberg have the ring of honesty and integrity that I would expect in a church that embraces transparency. Comments on this tragedy inform are thinking and prompt us to pray for all involved. Up to now I have not heard any comments addressing another party in this tragedy, those who Bishop Cook would be shepherding in this difficult world. I am sure the church will be providing for their spiritual and ecclesiastical needs, however, including them at the table, that is, in our thoughts and discussion would be helpful. John C. Kimbrough says: John C. Kimbrough says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA William A. Flint, PhD says: T J White says: Rector Albany, NY Christopher Johnson says: Charles Nutter says: January 11, 2015 at 10:54 pm If Bishop Sutton consented to the concealment of bishop Cook’s prior offense from the convention which elected her, what questions does this raise about his judgment as a bishop? Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem January 13, 2015 at 4:10 pm And what questions does this raise about the Presiding Bishop’s judgment in taking order for Bishop Cook’s ordination? Women like men should not be exempt from that consideration. January 12, 2015 at 3:16 pm Once upon a time, the Episcopal Church decided that the politically correct thing to do was to do was to elect a green apple to be a bishop and so it did in order to make a social statement. Then it was the politically correct thing to elect a yellow grape to be a bishop and so it did for the same reason. Soon the Episcopal Church had elected a whole House filled with multi-colored politically correct bishops in order to make social statements. In each election, the Episcopal Church was striving for equality and diversity because that was the catch words of the day. My question is this” “What profits the Episcopacy if it gains the world’s politically correct awards and loses its own soul?” The checks and balances in the election process it broken and needs to be corrected whereby the Voice of the Holy Spirit can be clearly discerned and the politics be silenced.Let those who read also understand what the read. Rector Belleville, IL Susanna DesMarais says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis J. W. McRee says: January 9, 2015 at 9:52 pm Excellent insights John…Thank you so much and may you be blessed in all things…… January 9, 2015 at 8:24 pm “Interesting” that her prior legal issues were kept secret from the convention electing a new bishop. In fact, I find this disturbing. Submit a Job Listing January 12, 2015 at 9:05 pm Perhaps bishops with jurisdiction and diocesan standing committees might exercise their own due diligence by doing their own background checks before consenting to episcopal elections. Arrest and adjudication information is a matter of public record and is easily obtainable by anyone. There’s plenty of blame to go around. Frogmire Anders von Vondervolt says: January 10, 2015 at 9:59 am Every time I say that there is too much emphsis on alcholo in the church, I’m shouted down. I left a church because congrgants were routinely drunk and impaired at the Wed evening churh dinners. The Priest’s answere to my complaint-we drink becasue we can. There was’t a single chrurch function where alcohol was not served. TThis Priest has moved on and is now brewing beer in the church and have Beer and Bible studies. The Bishop appoved a church’s involvement in a music festival that has been cited for two years for drug and alcohol violations. The feeling is that turning the church into a cocktail lounge will bring yourger people to the church. January 10, 2015 at 2:42 am As traffic becomes more complex, new driving skills must be developed. I changed from pedal cycle to motorcycle when I found a bus 12 inches from my elbow! I used a motorcycle for about 15 years in London (UK) traffic. There I developed DEFENSIVE DRIVING. Expect erratic behaviour from all! Never make yourself the ‘jam’ in the sandwich (do not advance between lanes unless they are not moving). Due to arthritis, I now use a car and the ‘game’ has changed. Cyclists not obeying the highway code – e,g., riding abreast, not observing rights of way on roundabouts. Cyclists, drivers, and pedestrians phoning and texting. Here it is illegal for drivers to phone but pedestrians phone and talk while on the pavement(road) without looking! NO ONE (pedestrian, cyclist, or driver) should be on the road when over the limit! J. W. McRee says: Submit a Press Release January 10, 2015 at 12:14 pm Was there a canonical disciplinary process conducted by the Diocese of Easton following the 2010 DUI event? If so, what was its nature? What did it conclude? What discipline did it impose?If the canonical process was not followed, did this omission enter into the determination (by whom is unclear) not to make public any information about the 2010 DUI event during the entire search process, to the voters in the electing convention, to the bishops and standing committees consenting to the election, and to all people interested in the election of a bishop in the Episcopal Church? Hugh Hansen, Ph.D. says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Cathedral Dean Boise, ID January 11, 2015 at 6:36 pm I agree, Jane. Unfortunatly, it seems there is always some degree of push back when it comes to talking openly about alcoholism and other addictive illness even within our progressive church. When I was serving on the diocesan recovery commission there were always stories of a less than enthusiastic embrace of our ministry- many times from clergy-even one member who was told that there were no alcoholics in their parish…stories of people who would linger longer than others where the wine was served at clergy conference…etc, etc. One would hope TEC would use this situation to do some soul searching about how we address this issue so that in the future these problems are not ignored. We as a church are not doing anyone any favors by looking the other way. It is easy for persons with addictive illness to hide in plain site within our church since we place no religious restrictions on the consumption of alcohol and frequently serve it at church functions. Many are not awsre that we as a church have a policy on serving alcohol at church functions, but I am not sure how many parishes actually adhere to it. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 January 9, 2015 at 10:40 pm Given the .22 alcohol level and deadly result of the current offense, and given that the nominating committee in Maryland: A) knew about her previous DUI at a similarly high level… not to mention the marijuana pipe… B) decided to nominate her anyway, and C) didn’t inform the diocesan convention voters about either A or B, — a modest proposal: that perhaps that nominating committee leadership should be considered for disciplinary action as well. It’s kind of the classic “who knew what, and when did they know it, and why didn’t they do something about it.” Cathy Cox says: January 14, 2015 at 5:43 pm I agree with Theodore and John about the consent process. Those bishops and standing committees who consented to the election: they should resign as well. Their failure to consider the results of background checks gave Bishop Cook opportunity for killing another rather than a journey of healing for herself. The cyclist’s family must live with the process of loss and grief, because those responsible for the process of ordination to the episcopate were negligent and will excuse themselves. January 11, 2015 at 11:06 am She isn’t permitted to function as a priest or bishop. She is likely to be removed, but that is a process that requires some time. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Nicholson B. White says: Len Freeman says: Linda Burnett says: Anne Bay says: Rector Smithfield, NC January 9, 2015 at 8:14 pm Unless she chooses to resign, the canonical process under Title IV has to play out, and that takes time. I was impressed by the fact that Bishop Sutton immediately placed her on leave and inhibited her instead of delaying that. Theodore W. Johnson says: Steve Skardon says: John Gangwisch says: Jon Spangler says: Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Linda M Ewing says: Rector Tampa, FL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit an Event Listing January 27, 2015 at 11:10 am I think the former bishop of Maryland, Robert Ilhoff, makes an excellent statement. Regarding the vetting process, I cannot speak for it. Bishop Ilhoff’s statement is below:Each time a bishop is consecrated, she/he is charged: “You are called…to be in all things a faithful pastor and wholesome example for the entire flock of Christ.” Earlier at his/her priestly ordination, each candidate answers, “I will,” to the following: “Will you do your best to pattern your life in accordance with the teachings of Christ, so that you may be a wholesome example to your people?” Bishops and priests all fall short and are guilty of sin, like the rest of us. Despite the fact none of us is perfect, we all have a right to expect the persons the Church ordains will take responsibility for their actions, will model best practices, and will willingly accept the consequences of their actions. Over the last several days, many have heard orread Caroline+’s excellent and powerful sermon of Sunday past, many of you participated in the moving meetings after each service. A number of you participated in the January 1st bike ride to memorialize Tom Palermo. Our clergy met with the Bishop on Tuesday, and most of us continue to mull over and talk about Tom Palermo’s tragic death caused by our Bishop Suffragan, Heather Cook. It is the main topic of conversation everywhere I go and we are still reeling from its implications. None of this is made better by the fact we are still waiting for charges to be filed and do not know a number of key details.We do know an innocent man is dead and his family grieving. We know that Heather, the driver of the car left the scene of the accident and returned later. We do not yet know other crucial details; there is much speculation. However we know enough to assume Heather will not be allowed to resume her episcopal ministry. Why? She has violated the basis for our trust in leaving the scene of the accident. All persons have a moral responsibility to stop whatever the nature of an accident. When a life hangs in the balance, that duty to stop and assist is especially crucial. We will, sadly, never know if Heather’s stopping and calling 911 would have enhanced efforts to keep Tom Palermo alive; what we do know is she ceased being “a wholesome example,” as she drove away. Can she be forgiven? Yes, by God and after repentance. Can she be trusted as a leader of the Christian Church? Sadly, “No.” This accident will haunt her the rest of her life, regardless of what other details eventually come out. The Church deposes clergy who cross boundaries of sexual morality or who embezzle money or are guilty of a variety of crimes, including “hit and run.” It’s not that these persons no longer have a ministry or God can’t use them, it’s that we can no longer trust them to model a “wholesome example” as leaders in the Church. Already, Presentment charges are being prepared by The Episcopal Church which will almost assuredly result in Heather being deposed. Of course, we should hold her in prayer and trust in time, God will be able to guide her into new ways of service. She may even be able in time to draw on her tragic story in ways which will edify others. We should all be humbled in this tragedy to realize anew how potentially dangerous each of us can become behind the wheel of a car if we are inattentive, distracted, or careless. We can be more watchful and courteous to bikers and pedestrians (as well as to other drivers). We cannot change this tragedy, but we can learn from it. Linda Burnett says: Thomas Andrews says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET January 9, 2015 at 7:56 pm Google Children of Tom Palermo for the educational fund for their two children. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Hopkinsville, KY January 10, 2015 at 1:50 pm Alcoholism is a disease just like diabetes and it is treatable just like diabetes, including treatment for the rest of her life. Would not you want to know that the candidate for bishop or rector was diabetic? Why not for alcohol? If she were in recovery, she could set an outstanding example for all of us, but instead she has shamed herself and the Church. We need to drag alcoholism (and drug abuse) out of the closet and confront it and treat it. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Knoxville, TN January 9, 2015 at 9:43 pm This update is most interesting. I was surprised about the pot possession charge. Perhaps the fact that I was sexually molested and abused by an Episcopalian minister when I was 13 years old would qualify me to be the Bishop of The Episcopal Diocese of Long Island. I mean, could I really be any more irresponsible and disrespectful to my fellow clergymen and lay followers then Oris Walker Jr. was. Better yet, I would like to have Dr. Katharine Jefferts Schori’s job. Seriously though, being a student of the Bible and a flawed but sincere servant of God, as we all are, this is such a sad tragedy for all, but I think that the Episcopal church has kind of screwed up here……and everybody knows it……. January 9, 2015 at 8:20 pm This tragedy is more than high distressing to me–I have been both a cyclist and an Episcopalian for over 50 of my 62 years. Bishop Cook has apparently failed to be transparent and honest–with herself, her God, and with the church–about her addiction and her behavior(s). Having known several bishops and many other clergy during my life, I have seen what temptations they are offered, especially in using alcohol and other drugs. Especially given her additional training and knowledge as a priest, how Bishop Cook could have gone through her previous (2010) DUI conviction process and failed to deal honestly herself and others–especially the Diocese of Maryland–is appalling. (It may be very, very human, too, but her additional responsibility and trust as a bishop would seem to call for an even higher standard of conscientiousness and self-revelation on her part.)I am, of course, praying for all of the people harmed and in mourning as a result of this tragic failure on the part of Helen Cook. But I also hope that justice will be served. I hope and trust that the Diocese of Maryland will deal generously with the Palermo family without their having to pursue legal action. Furthermore, I pray and hope that the church will learn to take a far more careful and healthy stance towards alcohol use and abuse, especially among its clergy, and to account far more carefully for drug and alcohol abuse in its discernment and selection processes. There are the very least we can do as a tribute to Tom Palermo. Perhaps such a careful approach to alcohol abuse will be one of Helen Cook’s legacies, too. January 9, 2015 at 9:50 pm There is a process that, as someone else mentioned, must play out…….I think the church looks as bad as this unfortunate and unhappy woman does….I feel sympathy for her and her plight and wonder if she will do time in prison……and how much time? Probably between 7 to 10 years…….Having spent time in prison as a young man and later having taught men and women in two provincial prisons as a volunteer in Cambodia, I have much compassion to those who do time, but the way of the world and societies and cultures is to punish those who break the law and commit crimes……This woman is not a criminal, but she has committed a crime…….I wonder how she could have been such a troubled soul, but I wonder more why the church did not know her problems were so severe and take some sort of action to deal with them….. January 13, 2015 at 6:57 pm She has to resign. Her public ministry is finished. Rector Shreveport, LA Press Release Service January 10, 2015 at 8:31 am Forgiveness of past infractions is the way of the church. But, forgiveness without realistic treatment and help with the initial problem assures the individul will have more failres. Forgiveness and second chances need to be coupled with authentic treatment for the problem. Rector Martinsville, VA By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jan 9, 2015 Curate Diocese of Nebraskalast_img read more

Church of England investment arm wins international awards

first_img Rector Hopkinsville, KY By Gavin Drake Posted Dec 6, 2016 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Job Listing Anglican Communion Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Events Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Press Release Service Associate Rector Columbus, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Tags Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Press Release Rector Belleville, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Church of England investment arm wins international awards Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit an Event Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Albany, NY [Anglican Communion News Service] The Church Commissioners – the statutory investment body responsible for historic assets of the Church of England – has won three major prizes at the Investment & Pensions Europe Awards for its ethical and responsible investment work. The awards – for Climate Related Risk Management; Environment, Social and Governance; and Real Estate – come on top of the two awards the commissioners won in April at the Portfolio Institutional Awards. But it did not take the top award of Best European Pension Fund, for which it was shortlisted.Full article. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Martinsville, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FLlast_img read more

Standing Rock chaplains attended to needs after joyful news

first_img Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA December 16, 2016 at 1:50 pm It was a profound privilege to be at the camp, to abide at the church, offer reasonable and specific help to suffering people, and to witness such searing joy on the faces of those who found meaning and purpose in their commitment to be there and do the necessary work at hand. Lauren Stanley says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Dakota Access Pipeline, December 23, 2016 at 6:42 pm I am looking forward to the undoing of this temporary leftist, ecofascist, Marxist, misguided, theologically vacuous debacle by the incoming Administration. Standing Rock Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Ronald Davin says: Rector Collierville, TN Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC PJcabbiness says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit a Press Release Standing Rock chaplains attended to needs after joyful news Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Mary Leyendecker says: Press Release Service Zoe Wyse says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem December 17, 2016 at 12:41 am Fireworks went off Sunday night of the Veterans Deployment, if memory served. #NoDAPL Fb Friends were madly concerned and prayerful. Delighted to find this post.. sharing! Best wishes from South Texas. Submit an Event Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Washington, DC Comments are closed. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Bath, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Martinsville, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Albany, NY Featured Events Associate Rector Columbus, GA center_img Youth Minister Lorton, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab December 15, 2016 at 1:34 pm Why not now send them out to Aleppo where they are needed ? Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Pittsburgh, PA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Advocacy Peace & Justice, Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET George Swanson says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Indigenous Ministries, Judith Gregory says: Tags December 16, 2016 at 10:22 am Thank you Lauren for these wonderful words around a shared experience. I hold in my heart the conversations we had in the small bedroom in Khartoum when you were returning and I was leaving. Thanks for the work that all of you are doing. And, going where called. Rev. Lewis BrightHeart PureMt Headrick says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY By Lauren R. StanleyPosted Dec 15, 2016 December 15, 2016 at 6:47 pm I would go. Rector Belleville, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Comments (8) Rector Tampa, FL December 15, 2016 at 4:34 pm Jesus Christ, Child of God, Have mercy on us sinners. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Job Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA The trauma chaplains at Oceti Sakowin Camp.[Episcopal News Service – Cannon Ball, North Dakota] When the trauma chaplains who volunteered to go to the Standing Rock Sioux Nation in North Dakota answered the call, none of them knew exactly what to expect.Thousands of military veterans were planning to descend on the Oceti Sakowin Camp just north of the reservation to stand between those opposed to the Dakota Access Pipeline, known as water protectors, and the Morton County Sheriff’s Department and other law-enforcement personnel from across the country.The chaplains and veterans alike had seen news coverage of law-enforcement personnel using water cannons in sub-freezing weather, along with rubber bullets, tear gas, pepper spray and acoustical devices, on the water protectors in late November at the Backwater Bridge on Highway 1806, and wanted to stand in support of the water protectors. Both groups were worried that if violence broke out between water protectors – and their supporters – and law enforcement personnel, a lot of emotional trauma would surface.The crowd at the sacred fire at the Oceti Sakowin Camp. The red-hatted people in the center are trauma chaplains. Photo: Lauren R. StanleyThe Rev. John Floberg, the priest in charge of the Episcopal church on the North Dakota side of Standing Rock, was worried about that potential trauma, and asked the Rev. Canon Michael Pipkin, missioner for missional management in the Episcopal Church in Minnesota, to put together a team of trauma chaplains who could serve all sides of the controversy.“This is what the Jesus Movement is all about,” said Pipkin, a former Navy chaplain who served in Iraq. “God is at work on both sides of that bridge, and the church is called to respond to that human suffering on both sides. … God is at work on both sides of the bridge, and that’s where we needed to be, on both sides.”“That doesn’t mean we don’t get to have an opinion,” Pipkin said, “but opinions don’t heal people. God’s love heals people, and we were here to share God’s love.”Pipkin added that “each of our chaplains took an enormous risk in responding to a call that none of us knew, at the beginning of any day, what we might experience, who we might encounter, what dangers were in store for those we were here to care for.”The Rev. John Floberg stands near an Episcopal Church flag that was added to the flags of other organizations and tribes participating in the protest against the Dakota Access Pipeline. Photo: John Floberg Facebook pageThe call for the chaplains was made possible, he said, “because of the work that John Floberg has done here on the Standing Rock for 25 years. His call for clergy to come in November was a natural extension of his passion for these people, as was his recognition as a veteran (of the Coast Guard) of the needs that the veterans bring.”All of the chaplains agreed that the specific invitation from Floberg and the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe leadership was important to their discernment of whether to go to North Dakota.As the chaplains arrived from around the country, they underwent training and orientation, and prepared for what could have been a contentious situation. The U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, which controls the federal land where the main water protectors’ camp was situated as well as the Missouri River, previously had announced that the protectors had to abandon the camp by Monday, Dec. 5. Protectors and veterans alike had vowed to ignore that order, as well as subsequent orders by the state of North Dakota to leave.Then on Sunday, Dec. 4, the Corps announced it was denying the easement permit for Energy Transfer Partners, the pipeline builders, to drill under Lake Oahe, a widening of the Missouri River just north of the reservation. That announcement took everyone involved by surprise.“This was not what I expected,” said Edie Love, a Unitarian Universalist candidate for ministry from Memphis, Tennessee. “I expected to be walking around offering pastoral care in the cold. I thought it would be emotional work instead of physical work, like digging snow to make a footprint for the chaplains’ tent early Sunday.”Love was helping to set up that tent when word came that there was important news from the Corps of Engineers.“I was crying tears of joy” when she heard the announcement. “There’s nowhere else on Earth I would rather have been in that exact moment,” she said. “It was electric.”The Oceti Sakowin Camp on U.S. Army Corps of Engineers land near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Photo: Lauren R. StanleyThe Very Rev. Paul Lebens-Englund, dean of St. Mark’s Episcopal Cathedral in Minneapolis, had planned to come to the Standing Rock because of the eviction announcement, to be a chaplain and to “exercise my privilege to be a witness to whatever happened.” Once Pipkin realized Lebens-Englund was going to be there, he asked the dean to be part of the chaplains’ team.“The best part of the whole thing,” he said, “was John Floberg telling the story from his perspective; he was just weeping. The best part of the whole day was seeing a guy who has walked faithfully with all of this … it was a total delight.”The Rev. Lauren R. Stanley, left, superintending presbyter of the Rosebud Episcopal Mission (West), and the Rev. John Floberg, priest-in-charge of the Standing Rock Episcopal Mission on the North Dakota side, shortly after the announcement by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Photo: Paul Lebens-EnglundLebens-Englund was moved by the experience of the Oceti Sakowin community. The camp, he said, had “incredibly profound and clear core values, and they circled around every day to make sure everyone knew that it was about love and mutual concern, and stopping the circle of violence … their mission is to witness to an alternative way of being together. … That’s the beauty of this.”On Sunday afternoon, Lewis BrightHeart PureMountain Headrick, a Soto Zen Buddhist chaplain from Loveland, Colorado, was praying for a missing young man at the Two Spirit Camp inside Oceti Sakowin. As he finished, Headrick went to the chaplains’ tent and learned that people were gathering at the sacred fire.As he walked he heard people yelling and hollering. He encountered Floberg, who conveyed the words of Phyllis Young, one of the Standing Rock elders, who said, “Today there is peace between us and the U.S. military. We forgive the government for the assassination of Sitting Bull. We forgive the government for the assassination of Crazy Horse.”Hedrick continued: “And then he said, ‘Here’s the first offer to be at peace between the tribe and the Army,’ and how truly amazing and remarkable it was to have this opportunity to have peace.”For the Rev. Katharine Bradtmiller, associate rector at St. John the Evangelist Episcopal Church in Minneapolis, the call to be a trauma chaplain was an opportunity to live out the Baptismal Covenant. “Being a chaplain,” she said, “puts you in the position of having to respect the dignity of every human being. I’m deeply grateful for the courage it takes for people who are on the ground doing really hard work to welcome support from other people. … It’s a privilege to be in a place where people are all scared and courageous and working really hard.”Bradtmiller and the other chaplains spent part of Monday, Dec. 5, working with veterans in several places, both at the camp and at the Prairie Knights Casino, where some veterans had gone to take part in a forgiveness ceremony.“Most of what I did, both outside in a blizzard and in tents and indoors was listening to veterans struggling to find that intersection of their own story and the story of the indigenous peoples who were protecting this water, … where their own trauma and bravery and love and sacrifice met everyone else’s stories of trauma and bravery and love and sacrifice in a way that allowed them to protect people who needed protecting.”Helping people find that intersection between their own experiences and those of others was core to the call for the chaplains, said Pipkin. “I recognize that suffering is an experience that binds human beings together. I hoped to be able to extend the love of these good people toward not just the water protectors but to the veterans, who bring with them a considerable amount of trauma, and the expectation that their trauma would merge with the trauma that is here.“I also recognize that law enforcement on the other side of the bridge have difficult jobs to do, and while we may have certain feelings about that job, we have to recognize that oftentimes, law enforcement (personnel) experience something in the performance of their duties. I imagine being on the other end of that bridge has its own sense of trauma.”On Dec. 5, when it was obvious that the Corps’ announcement and the blizzard had changed everything, “it became really apparent that the chaplains had an opportunity to make a real difference in the lives of people. The challenge was that the vets had very specific kinds of direct action (they were planning to take), but with the shift of the government’s position, the mission for them also shifted considerably. That meant that there were 4,000 veterans looking for a new mission, and a major blizzard was pressing down on the camp, so there was a volatile mix possible,” said Pipkin.The chaplains split up to meet as many people and needs as possible. “I’m really proud of how the chaplains found places to be and chose strategic places, both at the front line, at the medical tent, at the casino … At every place that veterans were, the chaplains were in position to provide a calming presence.”“Our chaplains were excellent at reading situations and anticipating where they would be used. … I don’t think we can take credit for peaceful outcomes, but it certainly was a privilege to experience a camp where prayer was the purpose,” he said.Staycie Flint, a lay leader from All Saints’ Episcopal Church in Chicago who is endorsed by the Episcopal Church as a chaplain and is board-certified, responded to the call for chaplains because she “heard there was a need to provide complex care for people who have complex trauma with our veterans. I was expecting it to run up against generational, compounded trauma from the different tribes.”“The traumas that we came out to deal with became different” after the Corps’ announcement, she said. “Because all the plans changed, there was a discombobulation among the veterans. I had very honorable and wonderful experiences among Native veterans and their sense of displacement among the plans. … Native veterans were talking about how their experience while serving always included being marginalized … (of) being always invisible. And then having their non-Native brothers and sisters come out here, and hoping they would finally be seen.”Flint said, “This is the moral compass of our country right now, because it speaks to how we call each other in and live in unity, and loving each other. … The advantage of having trained people out here is that they knew how to stay present to what was happening for other people and not get caught up in their own experience, so that the people who needed their care could have their own experience and not have it usurped.”Based on the team’s experiences on the Standing Rock, Pipkin said that it “seems to be that there is a natural opportunity to create a team of chaplains who can respond to emergency needs around the nation and beyond, whether it be to natural disaster, local conflicts, protest actions, terrorism, violence, or anywhere where human suffering requires a loving touch.”“Whether it’s through a coalition of organizations like Episcopal Relief & Development and Lutheran Relief Services and Unitarian Disaster Response, that kind of thing could be possible.”Pipkin added that one of the strengths of the chaplains’ team was that it was multifaith in nature, with Christians of many denominations “walking beside Buddhists and Unitarians and others.” He said that 30 of the 32 chaplains who signed up were able to make it to Standing Rock (two were stranded in the blizzard). There were 10 Episcopalians, three Buddhists, two United Church of Christ ministers, five Unitarians, six Disciples of Christ ministers and four pastors from the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America.He also thanked the Episcopal bishops who supported the team, “especially Jeff Fisher, bishop suffragan of Texas, who gave generously from their discretionary funds for travel and equipment. Their generosity helped make this chaplaincy successful.”– The Rev. Lauren Stanley, superintendent presbyter of the Rosebud Episcopal Mission West in South Dakota, was part of the chaplain team at Standing Rock. December 15, 2016 at 5:08 pm Thank you for doing this beautiful work. I very much agree that the love from the divine–by whatever name we may call it–is for everyone and that this is so much stronger and more important than anything else.If people do not believe in any divine force, they can still love one another, which is a deeply spiritual act too. No matter what spiritual beliefs we may each have, if we have love in our hearts that is the most important thing of all. No belief or opinion can possibly be more important than love. Love for everyone naturally guides people to peaceful ways of being. It is so wonderful to see a situation in which people were able to peacefully work for what was right. Featured Jobs & Callslast_img read more

Episcopalians labor on to help Hurricane Harvey-hit Gulf Coast

first_img Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI By Mary Frances Schjonberg and Amy SowderPosted Sep 1, 2017 Episcopalians labor on to help Hurricane Harvey-hit Gulf Coast One week after storm’s first landfall, survivors assess damage, plan recovery Still, some churches are trying to donate material goods. Christ Church in Covington, Louisiana, has given 100 blankets to a shelter Houston. The donation started when a friend texted the Rev. William Miller: “I had to tell 300 people that we were out of blankets. If you could have seen the look in their eyes…”Miller, the church’s rector, writes here about the quest that followed. The Rev. Scott Painter, curate at St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church in Houston and Miller’s friend, found his way to a Costco store that had just reopened and that had blankets. He texted photos of the options and Miller had him buy 100, sending him a check. Painter delivered them to NRG Stadium, where 10,000 people were expected by the end of that day.“In the grand scheme of relief efforts, in a swampy region spread out over a vast territory with 6 million inhabitants, 100 blankets delivered to one shelter probably won’t make much of a difference,” Miller wrote. “But for the 100 people at the shelter who end up with one, it might make some difference. And you and I can each make some difference. Together, we can make a big difference.”Previous ENS coverage of Hurricane Harvey is here.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is interim managing editor of the Episcopal News Service. Amy Sowder is a special correspondent for the Episcopal News Service, as well as a writer and editor based in Brooklyn, New York. September 1, 2017 at 8:07 pm The media is doing its best to keep the rest of the world informed about the many facets of this extraordinary, complex situation, and top among the reports coming out are those from Episcopal News Service. Thank you both, and those helping you gather and share the information, for all you are doing! Comments are closed. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Pittsburgh, PA Press Release Service 2017 Hurricanes, Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Bath, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Jennifer Wickham, who lives in Corpus Christi where her husband is rector of All Saints’ Episcopal Church, is helping coordinate volunteers at Trinity. “We were overwhelmed at several times today, not only by the generosity of volunteers who came to help, but also by the sheer volume of people bringing truckloads of supplies,” she said in an update late on Aug. 31.The outpouring is wonderful, she wrote, but “it is becoming clear that the storage of donations will quickly become a challenge — not only for us, but also from many of the grassroots organizations working in the community.” The few places in town that are clean and secure are filling with large deliveries of supplies, and some groups have even begun to turn donations away.“But this is not because we have enough items,” wrote Wickham, who is also the development coordinator for Saint Vincent Centre for Handicapped Children in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. “It is simply a reality that there are not enough places to put all of the things we need.”Thus, Wickham suggested that people donate in just one of two ways: labor and money.“I am exhausted, but amazed by the people, resources, and love that keep pouring in,” the Rev. James Derkits, Trinity by the Sea’s rector, said in West Texas’ update.Derkits, his wife, Laura, and their family had to relocate when they discovered after Harvey that the storm destroyed the nearby rectory. They hope to move back to Port Aransas into a friend’s condominium once power is restored, he told Episcopal News Service.Meanwhile, Trinity will have two services on Sept. 3.St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Rockport, Texas, near where Harvey made landfall, sustained minor damage. Photo: St. Peter’s Episcopal Church via FacebookIn nearby Rockport, Texas, St. Peter’s Episcopal Church sustained minor damage. The congregation used its Facebook page to check on its members.St. Peter’s state is unusual. Rockport Mayor Charles Wax estimated that 30 to 40 percent of the town’s houses and businesses were destroyed, and another 30 percent are so damaged that they will need to be demolished.A parishioner of St. James Episcopal Church and School in Alexandria, Louisiana, Babs Leggett is worried about Trinity Episcopal Church in Galveston, Texas, where she and her husband, Jim Leggett III, attend when vacationing and visiting family. Leggett is on the church’s email list, and she received an email warning people that there would be no Sunday service on Sept. 3.“It’s like a second home to us,” Leggett told Episcopal News Service. Her cousins were away from their Houston home when Harvey hit, and their house sitter had to evacuate to a hotel with their cat. They still don’t know how their home fared, Leggett said. The Leggetts plan to send a check to help the parish recover. “We’re just grieving for what’s happening next door. We went through it with Katrina, and it’s unbelievably challenging.” Episcopal Relief & Development, September 2, 2017 at 1:27 pm This is what TEC should be doing. More of this and less leftward-leaning political activity! Volunteers at Trinity by-the-Sea Episcopal Church in Port Aransas, Texas, sort donations on Aug. 31. The church is serving as a staging ground for recovery workers in the town that is near where Hurricane Harvey made landfall. Photo: Jennifer Wickham via Facebook[Episcopal News Service] The rest of the United States might be headed into the three-day Labor Day weekend with thoughts of picnics and beaches, but Episcopalians along the Harvey-hit Gulf Coast will be working to clean up the damage and begin to put their lives, and the lives of their neighbors, back together.That work comes a week after Harvey developed into a hurricane in the Gulf of Mexico and made landfall as a Category 4 storm near Rockport, Texas, on the barrier islands beyond Corpus Christi shortly before 10 p.m. CDT Aug. 25. Harvey then moved over Copano Bay and made landfall again, this time as a Category 3 hurricane.After moving east and submerging the Houston area under nearly 52 inches of rain, a weakened Harvey wobbled back out over the gulf and then returned to land on Aug. 30, hitting again near Cameron, Louisiana.The New York Times reported Sept. 1 that at least 46 deaths were related to, or suspected to be related to, the storm. That number could still rise.The remnants of Harvey, now classified by the National Hurricane Center as Post-Tropical Cyclone Harvey, are moving northeastward across the Ohio Valley and pushing as much as 1 to 6 inches of rain into Kentucky, Indiana, Ohio and West Virginia.Harvey’s rainfall totals as of 5 p.m. EDT Sept. 1 are here.“All of the churches in the Diocese of West Texas are standing strong,” said the diocese on whose southern portion Harvey made its first two U.S. landfalls on Aug. 25. “There is damage, which is to be expected after a direct hit from such a large storm. Much of the damage includes fallen and broken trees and limbs, as well as large amounts of debris that were distributed with the 100+ mph winds and the storm surges.”The churches across the diocese are “doing what they are supposed to be doing,” the statement said. “They are responding and issuing calls to action by making numerous hygiene kits and beginning to gather and organize volunteer efforts.”In Port Aransas, Texas, Trinity by the Sea Episcopal Church, with its parish hall and church in relatively good shape, has become a gathering point for volunteers before they go out in neighborhoods. Once there, they are helping survivors clean up massive amounts of debris from their properties and ruined items from their homes and businesses.One volunteer, Eddie Roberson, said other folks “are out in droves providing free food and everything imaginable to help all of us working.”“A beautiful ray of hope in a place that desperately needs it,” he wrote in a Facebook post. “God Bless us all!”Roberson said it is hard to navigate through Port Aransas because most of the street signs are missing. “Be prepared, the devastation is unreal. The working conditions beyond the heat zaps your energy fast,” he wrote. “The mildew, humidity and heat from the sun make for a very humbling experience even for the most in-shape individual.”Volunteers need to have good gloves, cool clothing, baby wipes, mosquito spray and a lot of water, Roberson suggested. Submit a Press Release TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Comments (3) Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Washington, DC Ronald Davin says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET September 2, 2017 at 3:30 pm Remember, tomorrow is a National Day of Prayer for the victims of the storm, by Presidential Order. Shouldn’t need a Presidential Order, but it should get done. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Smithfield, NC Hurricane Harvey Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate Diocese of Nebraska New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Jobs & Calls AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA As the barrier island towns near Corpus Christi pick of the pieces, Episcopalians in Houston are helping their neighbors in that waterlogged city.Harvey survivors are finding food, cleaning supplies, underwear and more at Epiphany Community Health Outreach Services, a ministry of the Episcopal Church of the Epiphany. ECHOS helped 104 families on Aug. 31.“Virtually all of them needed cleaning supplies, food, diapers, baby formula and other staples for their homes,” the agency said in an emailed update. “Each of them had a story to tell. … Most who walked in our doors today lost everything. Some had damaged apartments. All have been traumatized. For many, it will take months for life to go back to normal. For others, it will be a new normal.”ECHOS will host what it is calling a Disaster Relief Food Fair on Sept. 2. Ten pallets of water and disaster relief food kits will be available. Bee Busy Wellness Center will have a nurse practitioner onsite to provide health assessments.And, because relief work needs fuel, a local Starbucks delivered donated coffee on Aug. 31 for ECHOS workers and clients. Tags Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ “These days of disaster have also been marked by many occasions of grace,” the Very Rev. Barkley Thompson, dean of Christ Church Cathedral in downtown Houston, wrote in a Sept. 1 Facebook post.The most recent example of that grace, he said, was the Rev. Steve Wells, the pastor of South Main Baptist Church, and his congregation delivering shoes to the Beacon. The Beacon is a cathedral ministry that offers homeless people daily services, civil legal aid, counseling and mentoring, and access to housing. The facility still has no power, Thompson said, “but as soon as we are able to reopen, every homeless woman or man who enters the door with waterlogged shoes will be able to receive a new pair. What a phenomenal act of generosity.”Thompson is helping to coordinate the rectors of Houston’s largest Episcopal churches to respond in the recovery effort. He noted on Aug. 31 that “this work is in no way restricted to the Episcopal Church,” citing Wells, along with the Rev. Tommy Williams of St. Paul’s United Methodist Church and Rabbi Oren Hayon of Temple Emanu El.“I’m humbled and blessed to witness the faith community in action,” he wrote. “For those who say the world would be better off without the church, I say visit Houston.”St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Rockport, Texas, near where Harvey made landfall, sustained minor damage. Photo: St. Peter’s Episcopal Church via FacebookMany congregations will be taking up special collections on Sept. 3 for the work of Episcopal Relief & Development. Individual donations can be made here.The organization, in partnership with the Episcopal Diocese of Texas, is responding to the immediate needs of people in the Greater Houston area, including Galveston. That support will help the diocese provide temporary housing for 50 families, recruit volunteers to help clean out homes and deploy trained, spiritual care teams to reach out to people evacuated to the George R. Brown Convention Center and in other hard-hit areas.Those teams are also distributing gift cards to help with purchasing food, basic supplies and necessities. The organization said its U.S. Disaster Program staff is in regular contact with the affected dioceses in Texas and Louisiana.“Our church partners are providing critical assistance and caring for their neighbors in the aftermath of this devastating storm,” said Robert W. Radtke, president of Episcopal Relief & Development. “I am deeply grateful to them and to our community of faithful supporters for their compassion and enormous generosity.”At the Diocese of Western Louisiana office, Holly Davis, communications missioner, said she was without power and cell phone service for most of Aug. 30 but was back to work by Sept. 1. So far, she had no reports of flooding at the diocesan churches.Dee Drell, senior warden at St. James Episcopal Church in Alexandria, which is northeast of Lake Charles and in the center of the state, said his and Leggett’s church will do a special offering for relief efforts Sept. 3.Louisiana’s mega-shelter in Alexandria is filling up with flood victims, Leggett said. More than 1,100 evacuees filled the 2,500 beds by the evening of Aug. 31, according to The Town Talk newspaper. “And now we’re expecting the shelter to overflow with people coming in from Lake Charles,” said Leggett, who’s also a part-time TV news producer.Across the Diocese of Louisiana, Episcopalians are remembering the generosity of the wider church after the devastation of Hurricane Katrina, and they are responding by collecting supplies and money. The diocese’s Facebook page is filled with such notices.The Rev. Deacon Elaine G. Clements, the Louisiana diocesan disaster coordinator, reiterated the warning, however, to keep it simple and stick to monetary donations for now, unless there is a personal relationship with someone on the ground in the most affected areas.“Two days ago, Houston needed diapers; now they are overflowing with diapers. Distribution and storage is a nightmare. So, money to Episcopal Relief & Development and gift cards [to local churches] are the way to go,” Clements told Episcopal News Service. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Terry Francis says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Submit an Event Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Events Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Collierville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Felicity Hallanan says: Rector Belleville, ILlast_img read more

Communion must deal with ‘ignorance’ and possible schism, Secretary General…

first_img New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Shreveport, LA Anglican Consultative Council Rector Belleville, IL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ [Episcopal News Service — Hong Kong] Anglican Communion Secretary General Josiah Idowu-Fearon April 29 painted for the Anglican Consultative Council’s 17th meeting a somewhat dire ecclesiastical and financial picture of the communion.He balanced a warning of “schism” with stories he said showed that “growth within the communion is very exciting.” The latter included “hundreds” of converts in Ethiopia and Algeria, a program of evangelism and spiritual renewal in Melanesia, and an increase in young people joining the Church of England.“Don’t let anybody deceive you that, because of our crisis, the spirit of the Lord is not moving,” he said. “The spirit of the Lord is moving even more because of the crisis. I believe it will move even more if we’re able to get focused on discipleship.”His remarks came during his hour-long amplification of a written report about his work since the ACC-16 meeting in Lusaka, Zambia, in 2016, and his reflections on the state of the communion.Idowu-Fearon told ACC members that the last three years have “opened my eyes to see a major problem within our communion: ignorance.”He said the problem is two-fold, beginning with “deliberate ignorance,” which he said occurs when a bishop or a primate (the episcopal leader of one of the communion’s 40 provinces) “pretends he doesn’t know” what it means to be an Anglican church.“And then there is ignorance as a result of lack of knowledge,” Idowu-Fearon said, adding, “Within a good number of our theological colleges and seminaries, Anglicanism is not even taught. Where it is taught, it is not Anglicanism; it is self-made Anglicanism.” Different provincial contexts mean that “Anglicanism has many faces, but there are basic things,” he said, particularly Anglican ecclesiology, meaning the Anglican understanding of the church, that are universal.Full ENS coverage of the 17th meeting of the Anglican Consultative Council is available here.“This is one the major reasons for the crisis we are facing today within this communion,” the secretary-general said.Idowu-Fearon challenged the ACC for its help answering the question, “How do we fight this ignorance that is chewing us up and creating further divisions within the communion?”Some provinces follow Anglican polity in which bishops, clergy and laypeople debate, “but in a good number of our provinces and dioceses, particularly in the global south, there are no debates” or when there are debates, they are not well informed, he said.Asking the pardon of anyone who might be offended, the secretary general said, “You would think we are a Roman [Catholic] church where decisions are taken and passed down.”“How,” Idowu-Fearon asked the ACC members, “do you want us to fight this ignorance?”Earlier in his report, the secretary general had asked for advice on how any archbishop of Canterbury can “enhance his ministry without his becoming a pope.”When the afternoon session began, Idowu-Fearon stepped to the podium to tell the council that he had assured Father Anthony Currer, the Roman Catholic observer at the meeting, that “something I said casually but seriously” was “not meant to derogate the Roman Catholic Church, particularly the position of the pope.” The secretary general said Currer accepted his apology, and Idowu-Fearon asked the same of the ACC.“What I said was serious. We are not a church. We are a communion of 40 provinces – so far,” he said. “Therefore, we do not have a curia and we do not have something similar to a pope. That is what I said. It’s not to say that our polity is better that the Roman Catholic polity.”A warning of schismIdowu-Fearon’s warning about a possible schism in the Anglican Communion came as he discussed GAFCON, or the Global Anglican Future Conference, an organization formed in 2008 when, according to its founders, “moral compromise, doctrinal error and the collapse of biblical witness in parts of the Anglican Communion” had reached a critical level.Anglican Communion Secretary General Josiah Idowu-Fearon gave a fiery report April 29 to the Anglican Consultative Council about his work since the ACC-16 meeting in Lusaka, Zambia, in 2014 and his reflections on the state of the communion. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceThe secretary general told the ACC that “the question is how should we respond to GAFCON.”He said that “the Lord has given me this position to stand and speak truth to power,” and so he would attempt such a response.Idowu-Fearon said he and Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby welcome GAFCON’s commitment to the renewal of the church and will pray for that work.“The difficulty arises when GAFCON involves itself in the structures of the communion in a way that causes confusion and potential division,” Idowu-Fearon said, noting the group’s decision to form ministry networks. The communion has 10 thematic networks that address and profile various issues and areas of interest in the Anglican Communion. GAFCON’s actions are not meant to fill a void in the communion’s work, he said.The secretary general said GAFCON’s 2018 “Letter to the Churches” contains some “regrettable” comments about Welby and the 2020 Lambeth Conference.Idowu-Fearon said he has difficulty with the calls in the letter “for some to be invited to the Lambeth Conference as full participants who are clearly not members of the communion, and for boycott of the Lambeth Conference and other meetings of the instruments” if GAFCON’s requests are not heeded.He said Welby is working with “the members of his team” to find “a way out of this dilemma.” However, he asked for the ACC’s help “to prevent a schism within our communion.”A warning about financesIdowu-Fearon said the Anglican Communion Office’s work is financially constrained. Later in the day, David White, the communion’s chief operating officer, told the ACC that work outlined in a six-year strategic plan the members requested at the last council meeting in 2016 could potentially at least double the office’s current annual spending of £2.0-2.5 million ($2.6-$3.2 million).The secretary general said that “two provinces keep this Anglican Communion Office going [as well as] our ministries within the communion.” He did not say which provinces. His written report said those two provinces contributed 67 percent.Historically the Church of England and The Episcopal Church have been the two largest contributors to what is known as the Inter-Anglican Budget. General Convention has budgeted $1.15 million as its 2019-2021 contribution (line 412 here). The secretary general said in his written report that 94 percent comes from 10 provinces.“There are provinces, that since 2011, have not paid a dime as part of their financial responsibility to the communion,” Idowu-Fearon told the council. He did not name those provinces.The secretary general asked for the ACC’s advice about what to do about provinces that “are able [to pay] but they are being financially irresponsible.”Both Idowu-Fearon and White said the communion office will begin to look at fundraising sources beyond the provinces, such as the Anglican Communion Compass Rose Society and grant-making institutions.“I want to challenge members from provinces that are not being financially responsible. I want to challenge you to speak with your bishops, to speak with your primates on being financially responsible,” Idowu-Fearon said.The ACC is scheduled to hear more about finances on May 4 and consider a new proposal for setting the level of financial commitments from the provinces.After lunch on April 29, the ACC members then spent 20 minutes at their tables discussing Idowu-Fearon’s report. They submitted written summaries of their reactions and advice.Read more about itACC background is here.Ongoing ENS coverage of the ACC is here.The Anglican Communion News Service is also covering the meeting here.Tweeting is happening with #ACC17HK.The bulk of the meeting is taking place at the Gold Coast Hotel, about 45 minutes from central Hong Kong.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is the Episcopal News Service’s senior editor and reporter. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Events Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Bath, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate Diocese of Nebraska Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Tampa, FL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Albany, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Apr 29, 2019 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit an Event Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH ACC17, Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Press Release Service Anglican Communion, Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Knoxville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Tags In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Communion must deal with ‘ignorance’ and possible schism, Secretary General tells ACC Idowu-Fearon also tells provinces to stop avoiding their ‘financial responsibilities’ to the communion’s mission and ministry Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Press Release Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VAlast_img read more

Paging all voters: The election is calling

first_img Mama Mia March 28, 2017 at 1:11 am March 27, 2017 at 11:33 pm Please enter your comment! LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply TAGSGreg Jackson Previous articlePublic Safety Day includes First Responder Fitness ChallengeNext articleIs Sam Ruth running for office in 2018? Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR How many of us, when we are looking for competent, professional services (i.e., doctor, mechanic, lawyer, plumber, accountant, etc.), would even consider using a person without first checking their professional background and pedigree? If you are anything like me, if you go to a doctor’s office and see a medical degree on the wall from a school you have never heard of or cannot pronounce, you will have no problem getting up and walking out. In fact, whenever my wife has been able to convince me to see a doctor, I spend the bulk of the time in the waiting and examination rooms looking around at the walls, checking for evidence of his or her experience and capabilities. The more degrees, articles, plaques, etc., I see from reputable publications, associations or institutions, the more comfortable I am with letting that person evaluate and make recommendations about how I should go about leading a healthier life. On one of the rare occasions when I ignored the tell-tale signs of a health care provider with “paper but-no-substance,” I ended up with an unnecessary procedure, wasted money and lost time that I can never recover. But I accepted fault for my failure to “vet” that person and figured I got what I deserved for not being more vigilant.Unfortunately, with political candidates, it is much the same way. It is no secret that I have placed myself up for public scrutiny on two occasions when I sought elected office. I only did so after I figured I had the skill, knowledge, experience and time necessary to dedicate myself to serve the citizens of Central Florida. Basically, I had become the type of candidate that I would not have had any problem supporting. I also recognized that there were other candidates in the races that I ran in who had the qualities I could support. But (taking a pregnant pause), there were other candidates who I looked at and said, “If this is all we have to look forward to, not only is our district lost, but the future of our state is at risk.” The reason I say that is because many times the folks who should not run for office, do so for the very same reasons that they should not be seeking public office. They feel entitled, they have no other options, they lack the experience to be successful in the private sector, they are all over the place (figuratively and literally), they do not know issues, they want to validate themselves, they have an inflated perception of who they are and what they can do, and unfortunately the list goes on. Individuals like this are dangerous while running for office because of the things they are willing to do and say to offset their shortcomings. However, they are equally dangerous if they are actually elected to public office because they become distractions and feel that their way is the only way to go. Even more so, once in office, they feel as if no one can question their actions or motives as if they become untouchable. (Hey, that may be a good topic to explore in another piece – The Untouchables: How Elected Officials have Evolved from Public Servants to Public Distractions – but I digress.)In short, all I am saying is this, as citizens we must make a concerted effort to educate ourselves on those who come forward to represent our community. Many times the candidates who come forth are good, upstanding citizens. Other times, which are the times we need to be very cognizant of, candidates who come forward are really just running because they lack the skills, experience, ethical fortitude, etc., to work in the private sector or any place else. If you ever have any doubts, here are some things to check for: If the candidate’s professional salary is less than that of the office they are running for, be cautious. If the candidate has never worked in the private sector, be cautious. If the candidate has personal financial issues, be cautious. If the candidate has a questionable background or history, be cautious. If the candidate says “I”, “me” and/or “my” more than he or she says “we”, “us” and “our”, be cautious. As the election cycle continues to pick up, I may find it necessary to provide more information to help our community to evaluate those seeking to represent us, and I will give my honest assessment of each, which of course will be done – in my humble opinion.Greg Jackson is a past Assistant Attorney General for the State of Florida, military veteran, current Orange County District 2 Representative on the Board of Zoning Adjustments, and General Counsel for the Community Redevelopment Agency. He has been as an active member of the Central Florida community for nearly 20 years. He was most recently a candidate for the Florida House District 45 seat. Reply Please enter your name here As the election cycle continues to pick up, I may find it necessary to obtain a barf bag……….LOL Sure hope Mayor Juana is coming soon………… Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 With an early start to the election season, educate yourself on the candidatesOpinionBy Greg Jackson, Esq.Greg Jackson UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Yada yada yawn yawn…….everybody, have you got that election advice down pat now??? LOL March 27, 2017 at 11:56 pm Reply 3 COMMENTS Mama Mia Reply You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Mama Mia Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more