SFL – acquisition of 2020-built VLCC with long term charter

first_img SFL has agreed to acquire a newbuild 308,000dwt crude oil carrier. (Credit: Adam Radosavljevic from Pixabay.) SFL has agreed to acquire a newbuild 308,000 dwt crude oil carrier, or “VLCC”, in combination with a 7-year bareboat charter, adding nearly $60 million to SFL’s fixed rate charter backlog.The vessel is expected to be delivered from the shipyard in China in the second quarter, and will have full cash flow effect in Q3 2020. The net purchase price will be $65 million, which is significantly below current broker estimates for VLCC resales, effectively providing SFL with a very attractive risk profile.SFL’s chartering counterparty, an affiliate of the Landbridge Group, has secured a 3-year sub charter to an oil major, providing good cash flow visibility. There will be purchase options for the charterer during the charter period, first time after three years, and at the end of the charter there is a purchase obligation.SFL will fund the acquisition with a $50 million non recourse bank debt facility at very attractive terms, and net cash flow after debt service during the first three years is estimated to more than $4 million per year on average.Ole B. Hjertaker, CEO of SFL Management AS, said in a comment: “Amidst the recent market volatility, we see attractive investment opportunities in our core markets. Some of the best investments can be made when the general market is less competitive, and staying focused and able to execute on accretive growth opportunities through the market cycles is a key differentiating factor.With a versatile toolbox, including time charters, bareboat charters and senior financing structures, SFL can provide prospective customers with competitive tailor made solutions, whilst at the same time creating shareholder value on the back of our strong balance sheet and our unique access to attractively priced capital.” Source: Company Press Release SFL will fund the acquisition with a $50 million non recourse bank debt facility at very attractive terms, and net cash flow after debt servicelast_img read more

Post-Doctoral Scientist – Dr. Damm’s laboratory

first_imgSpecial Instructions to Applicants Normal work hours Position NumberP00001 For more information, candidates should contact Dr. Erich Damm([email protected]). Candidates should submit their cover letteroutlining research interests, curriculum vitae and contactinformation for three academic references (contact informationonly, not letters) by clicking on the “Apply for This Job” linkabove or through http://www.vcujobs.com/. Only applicationmaterials submitted through VCU Jobs will be considered. DepartmentBiology Additional Information Job CategoryResearch Recruitment PoolAll Applicants Quick Linkhttps://www.vcujobs.com/postings/100977 Normal work days Resource CriticalNo Description of the Job CampusMonroe Park Campus Working TitlePost-Doctoral Scientist – Dr. Damm’s laboratory Open Until FilledYes Supplemental QuestionsRequired fields are indicated with an asterisk (*).Optional & Required DocumentsRequired DocumentsCover Letter/Letter of ApplicationCurriculum Vitae (CV)Reference Letter – 1Reference Letter – 2Optional DocumentsOther Document Remove from posting on or before Is any portion of this position grant-funded?Yes – Continuation of this position depends on funding of thegrant.center_img Job Code/TitlePD – Post Doctoral Does this position provide patient or clinical services to theVCU Health System?No Candidates experienced in hematopoietic development, zebrafishgenetics and embryological approaches, zebrafish husbandry,transgenesis, confocal microscopy, transcriptomics, flow cytometryand fluorescence activated cell sorting ( FACS ) are stronglyencouraged to apply. Sensitive PositionNo Required Qualifications Candidates must have a PhD in a biological field with less than 4years of post-doctoral experience along with expertise in molecularbiology techniques and a record of publication. Organizational Overview A fully funded post-doctoral position is available in thelaboratory of Dr. Erich Damm in the Virginia CommonwealthUniversity ( VCU ) Department of Biology. The Damm lab is an NIHfunded laboratory that studies the molecular control ofhematopoietic stem cell development using the established zebrafishembryo model of developmental hematopoiesis. Our recent work(Nature Cell Biology, 19:457-467, 2017) has identified integrateddevelopment of the embryonic vasculature, hematopoietic system andthe sympathetic nervous system and we are particularly interestedin studying the molecular mechanisms governing these developmentalprocesses. We are seeking a friendly, enthusiastic and highlymotivated individual to join our group and conduct research relatedto this area of developmental biology.The VCU research environment is exceptional with strongcollaborations and state-of-the-art resources. Additionally, theCity of Richmond is a highly affordable city located in themid-Atlantic region, is rich and diverse in culture and is steepedin history. The city is home to many historic sites, museums, andart galleries, a particularly vibrant dining scene and boasts afamily friendly environment. Job Open Date10/05/2020 Position TypePost Doc At VCU, we Make it Real through learning, research, creativity,service and discovery — the hallmarks of the VCU experience. Apremier, urban, public research university nationally recognized asone of the best employers for diversity, VCU is a great place towork. It’s a place of opportunity, where your success is supportedand your career can thrive. VCU offers employees a generous leavepackage, career paths for advancement, competitive pay, and anopportunity to do mission-driven work. Posting Details Hours/WeekFull-time Anticipated Hiring Range$52,704 Preferred Qualifications Does this position require a pre-placement medicalassessment?Nolast_img read more

SECAUCUS BRIEFS

first_img ×  1 / 2  Fourth graders at Huber Street School learn about the 9/11 Survivor Tree. Pictured are students Katherine Nardone, Hayden Reveron, Carmelo Camis, Kush Patel, Katerina Sakatos, Nora Ferati, Abigail Hegarty, and Aylee Tardieu. Educators include Secaucus High School Art Teacher Doug DePice, Secaucus Middle School Art Teacher Melissa Heintjes, and Secaucus Middle School History Teacher Amanda Wargocki. See briefs for more information.  2 / 2  The Clarendon Elementary School PTA hosted a “Help Harvey” drive for a school in Katy, Texas, after Hurricane Harvey. Pictured are Clarendon School teacher Mrs. Jessica Hensle and the United Postal Service Delivery Representative. See briefs for more information. ❮ ❯ Bringing Survivor Tree Awareness to the Students of Huber Street SchoolFaculty members from Secaucus Middle and High School: Amanda Wargocki, Melissa Heintjes, and Doug DePice introduced their interdisciplinary 9/11 Survivor Tree Project to the fourth grade students at Huber Street School. The presentation began with a brief history about the Callery Pear tree located at the World Trade Center site that survived the catastrophic events on 9/11/01.Fourth grade students were entranced by the pictures and stories shared with them from this monumental day. The presentation related to a previous reading and writing lesson on the story “The Survivor Tree: Inspired by a True Story” by Cheryl Somers Aubin. A historical reference to these events comprised their current events lesson for the week. Students participated in a special question and answer session with the instructors after the presentation concluded. After returning to their classrooms, students worked with their homeroom teacher to plan a drawing and writing activity involving their own stories about “survival.”“This was an inspirational day for the students,” says Elementary Supervisor, Dr. Danielle Garzon. “It is essential for students to make the connection that out of tragedy, new beginnings can flourish, such as what has happened with this tree.” 1 / 2  Fourth graders at Huber Street School learn about the 9/11 Survivor Tree. Pictured are students Katherine Nardone, Hayden Reveron, Carmelo Camis, Kush Patel, Katerina Sakatos, Nora Ferati, Abigail Hegarty, and Aylee Tardieu. Educators include Secaucus High School Art Teacher Doug DePice, Secaucus Middle School Art Teacher Melissa Heintjes, and Secaucus Middle School History Teacher Amanda Wargocki. See briefs for more information.  2 / 2  The Clarendon Elementary School PTA hosted a “Help Harvey” drive for a school in Katy, Texas, after Hurricane Harvey. Pictured are Clarendon School teacher Mrs. Jessica Hensle and the United Postal Service Delivery Representative. See briefs for more information. ❮ ❯center_img Clarendon Elementary School PTA sponsors “Help Harvey” driveBig change starts with small steps.Hurricane Harvey caused catastrophic flooding and damage to many areas in Texas. The residents of these areas lost not only their homes, but sustained major damage to their schools as well. The Clarendon Parent Teacher Association held a “Help Harvey” drive to help rebuild and restock a school in Katy, Texas. Teachers and Clarendon families donated school supplies and cleaning supplies. Jessica Hensle, first grade teacher at Clarendon School, was the liaison for collecting all donated items. There were twelve boxes at 40 pounds each, picked up by the United Postal Service. Thank you to everyone for their donations and participation in the “Help Harvey” drive. Help sought for the U.S. Virgin IslandsMayor Gonnelli and the Town Council would like to make collections of donations for the US Virgin Islands. Donations being sought include bottled water, formula, mouthwash, first aid kits, and batteries.Donations can be dropped off at the Senior Center, at 101 Centre Ave., Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., and Oct. 21, from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m.last_img read more

Conference speakers revealed

first_imgThe Federation of Bakers is preparing for its seventh annual conference, which will take place on 16 May in London.Speakers include: Dame Deidre Hutton, chair of the Food Standards Agency; Guy Farrant, director of food at Marks & Spencer; Jeya Henry, professor of human nutrition at Oxford Brookes University; and Edward Garner from TNS Worldpanel with the latest research and market trends.”It looks set to be an event that inspires interest and debate with engaging speakers, informed attendees and enlightening topics of discussion,” said Gordon Polson, director of the Federation.The panel debate taking place in the afternoon will be chaired by the editor of British Baker, Sylvia Macdonald, with a panel featuring Dr Andrew Wadge, chief scientist at the Food Standards Agency, Guy Farrant, Joe Street, managing director of Fine Lady Bakeries, and professor Robert Pickard of the British Nutrition Foundation.Booking forms are available from Amy Yeates, tel: 020 7420 7190 or email: [email protected] bakersfederation.org.uk.last_img read more

Lantmännen opens UK site

first_imgLantmännen Unibake is poised for growth in the UK after seeing the official opening of a new 8,000sq m bakery dedicated to Danish pastry production.The new purpose-built bakery in Bedford will employ about 150 people and will be able to produce more than 150 million Schulstad-branded Danish pastries a year. It is part of a £20m investment in the UK.Although officially opened by the local mayor, production is not due to start for another two months. Products will be distributed to supermarkets and caterers by Bakehouse, acquired by Lantmännen in 2010.Speaking in 2010, CEO Søren Landtved said: “The UK is Lantmännen Unibake’s single biggest market. We firmly believe that moving our production base from Denmark to a local UK site in Bedford will greatly benefit our overall growth opportunities within the UK.”last_img read more

Curating a visual record

first_imgThe new issue of the photography magazine Aperture, which just hit newsstands, is one of the largest in its history. The publisher even deemed the issue, titled “Vision & Justice,” worthy of two covers: the famous 1963 Richard Avedon photograph of Martin Luther King Jr. with his father and son, and an Afropunk fashion portrait shot by Awol Erizku that appeared in Vogue in 2014.Credit Sarah Elizabeth Lewis, assistant professor of history of art and architecture and of African and African-American studies, as the creative force behind the powerful project. As guest editor, she calls the 152-page magazine on race, photography, and history “significant.” It is the first issue on African-Americans, race, and photography for the magazine.“Photography plays a central role in the relationship of race, citizenship, and justice in this country. Yet recognizing the interventions of works of and by African-Americans to the larger history of photography has been a far more recent development,” Lewis said. “As a landmark photography foundation, Aperture recognized this and wanted to address it directly. The result of the issue is a commitment to more sustained engagement with the fuller range of images that shape our world.”Richard Avedon’s 1963 portrait of three generations of Kings is one of two covers to grace Aperture magazine’s latest issue. © The Richard Avedon FoundationLewis assembled a veritable who’s who of academic and artistic luminaries for the issue, including Henry Louis Gates Jr., Alphonse Fletcher University Professor and director of the Hutchins Center for African & African American Research, who penned the cornerstone piece about the much-photographed Frederick Douglass and his exacting use of the medium to effect change; Robin Kelsey, Shirley Carter Burden Professor of Photography and chair of the Department of History of Art and Architecture, who contributed reflections on Carrie Mae Weems’ “The Kitchen Table Series”; and an essay by Khalil Gibran Muhammad, professor of history, race, and public policy at Harvard Kennedy School and Suzanne Young Murray Professor at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, on contemporary urban portraitist Jamel Shabazz. Other Aperture voices include Leigh Raiford, associate professor of African-American studies at the University of California, Berkeley; and Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) Associate Curator Thomas J. Lax.“My aim was to create a collection of artists, writers, curators, poets, and scholars that honored the gravitas and urgency of this underexplored relationship of vision and justice,” said Lewis, who celebrated the launch of “Vision & Justice,” at an event earlier this month at the Ford Foundation in New York City that included Weems, Deborah Willis, Sarah Jones, and Chelsea Clinton.Lewis ’01 joined the Harvard faculty this year, and has a larger plan for “Vision & Justice.” Beyond the magazine, she will teach a class of the same name this fall with related works on display at the Harvard Art Museums, where students and museum visitors can study the works.“Visual literacy is increasingly urgent today. Engaged global citizenship requires grappling with pictures. We’re now able to witness injustices firsthand on a massive scale that would have been unimaginable decades ago, because of technology. We have to constantly read images with both our retinal mind and our reading mind, questioning context and embedded histories in each frame. Pictures are largely the way in which we process worlds unlike our own,” she said.Such a class is a natural progression for Lewis, who came to Harvard as an undergraduate intent on studying “the transformative power of the arts.” She recalled how her grandfather, Shadrack Emmanuel Lee, a painter and musician, was expelled from public school in 1926 for asking where “all of the African-Americans were.”The second cover of Aperture’s “Vision & Justice” issue features an Afropunk fashion portrait, “Untitled (Forces of Nature #1)” by Awol Erizku, which appeared in Vogue in 2014. Credit: “2014 © Condé Nast. Courtesy of Vogue.com“His pride was always so wounded from the expulsion that he never went back to high school,” she said. “As a young person, I was impacted by his choice to become an artist after that event.”At Harvard, she studied social studies and the history of art and architecture, writing her thesis on the resistance of artists of color in the 1960s and ’70s. She helped found the visual arts component of the Harvard Black Arts Festival, and she co-founded the Harvard Concert Commission. After graduating, she spent three years in England on a Marshall scholarship, working at the Courtauld Institute of Art and the Tate Modern in London, then got a job at MoMA. She left the world of curating to get her Ph.D. at Yale University, and published “The Rise,” a bestseller about the role of creativity and failure in art.Aperture features about 200 images. Some of them (featuring some of the same artists, such as Lorna Simpson and Frazier) will be on display at the Harvard Art Museums. At the heart of both iterations is “Memorial to Martin Luther King Jr.,” the portrait by Benedict J. Fernandez of three young men taken on the day of King’s assassination.“I find this image stunning,” said Lewis. “The [jacket] pins of King laid out on the bodies of these men, standing like stoic soldiers, hint at the unfurling of an archive. It’s emblematic of the aesthetic funerals that we would see in the wake of the Civil Rights Movement that tied art to contested citizenship.”Some of the tragedy reads more subtly. In Russell Lee’s “Kitchen of a Farm Security Administrator’s Tenant Purchase Client” (1939), a woman attends to domestic work in a stark all-white kitchen.“The homogeneity — the insistent whiteness of those cabinets — rhymes with the visual order that turned segregation into an imposed policy,” said Lewis. “There’s a light bulb at the center, but there’s no illumination. There’s a window that looks out onto nothing. It conveys how an image can give voice to the unspeakable.”last_img read more

Where are we now after a second impeachment?

first_img Experts say it is unclear, but potential national security risks abound Concern over storming of the Capitol Bacow, Harvard faculty, students call for affirmation of American principles What do Trump’s election denials and flurry of firings add up to? The U.S. House of Representatives made history Wednesday by impeaching a president for a second time, voting to charge Donald J. Trump with inciting the deadly Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol with false claims that the November election was fraudulently handed to President-elected Joseph R. Biden Jr.Some Harvard historians and political scientists say American democracy could very well be at an inflection point as the events of the last week continue to unravel. But all agree that what the future holds in the days leading up to Biden’s inauguration next week, beyond the likelihood of more pro-Trump protests by his supporters and partisan hostilities in Congress, remains unclear.“American democracy has had a number of inflection points — the founding, the Civil War and Reconstruction, women’s suffrage, the New Deal’s promise of social citizenship, and the Civil Rights Movement being perhaps the most important,” said Kenneth Mack, Lawrence D. Biele Professor of Law at Harvard Law School and affiliate professor of history.“By definition, it’s hard to know if something is an inflection point without some historical distance, but after seeing an American president help incite a mob to violently attack Congress in order to keep himself in power illegitimately, one must wonder” if this is another, he said. “Whether it is will depend on the actions of many people in the coming months and years.”The nation is “likely” at an inflection point, but which direction the change is headed is not yet known, said Alex Keyssar, Matthew W. Stirling Jr. Professor of History and Social Policy at Harvard Kennedy School (HKS). “These events could lead to a reinvigoration of democratic norms, a backing off from hostile partisan rhetoric, a greater respect for institutions. Or this could be the beginning (although not really the beginning) of a prolonged period of acute recriminations and hostility.”,The 232–197 vote ran largely along party lines, with 10 Republicans notably siding with the Democrats this time. No GOP members broke ranks after Trump’s 2019 impeachment, which charged him with abuse of power for trying to pressure the Ukrainian president to open a criminal probe into Biden and his son and obstructing a congressional inquiry into the matter. Trump was acquitted in the Senate.Yesterday’s Article of Impeachment calls for Trump’s immediate removal from office and seeks to disqualify him from holding “any office of honor, trust or profit” again. Trump, whose term ends Jan. 20, must be convicted by a two-thirds vote of the Senate, currently not scheduled to reconvene until Jan. 19, in order to be removed.,History’s assessment of the Trump presidency, whether Trump is removed or not, will almost certainly be harsh, especially given the gravity of last week’s events, analysts say.“One measure of people and of presidents is their entries and exits. Are they graceful or troubled, promising or disturbing?” said Roger B. Porter, M.A./Ph.D. ’78, IBM Professor of Business and Government at HKS, who teaches a course on the American presidency. “President Trump’s final days in office are deeply troubling in many ways. … Historians and political scientists are unlikely to ignore the events since [the] Nov. 3 [election] in their assessments of his presidency.”“I anticipate his presidency will go down as a colossal failure,” said Fredrik Logevall, Laurence D. Belfer Professor of International Affairs at HKS and a professor of history in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. “Perhaps Andrew Johnson — whose term, incidentally, ended much like the current one is ending — could challenge him for the title of worst president in U.S. history, but I don’t see anyone else.”Though it’s hard to be certain in the moment, given the unprecedented nature of Trump’s involvement in the assault on Congress, Logevall suspects that decades from now, most historians will see the second impeachment “as wholly justified, whatever the outcome of a Senate trial.”“Trump, they will say, had to be held accountable for inciting an insurrection against the American government. And they will say others, too, must share responsibility, namely the Republican lawmakers who have been Trump’s enablers all along, who didn’t just tolerate his assaults on the nation’s democratic norms and institutions, but cheered him on,” he said.Trump’s steadfast popularity with Republican voters, which grew during the 2020 election, complicates the political landscape. For months, he has hinted that he may launch his 2024 campaign next week if his legal and extra-legal efforts to overturn the 2020 election were unsuccessful.With Biden set to be sworn in Tuesday, Trump’s desire to stay in the spotlight sets up the possibility that he’ll try to run a shadow presidency, noisily second-guessing Biden and privately using his influence with Republican lawmakers who remain loyal to him to torpedo the Democrats’ legislative agenda.There have been instances of bad blood between outgoing and incoming administrations before, famously in the cases of John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, as well as Herbert Hoover and Franklin Delano Roosevelt. In recent decades, however, there’s been an informal norm that ex-presidents refrain from public criticism of their successors out of respect for the office and the will of the voters.,“Something tells me that Trump, who lacks any sense of history, any respect for our system’s norms, will not be deterred by this precedent. The question is whether he’ll find much of an audience for his attacks,” said Logevall.Repelled by the president’s role whipping up and cheering on his supporters for the siege that left five dead, a growing number of major corporations and lenders have severed ties with Trump and his real estate firm and halted donations to his supporters in Congress. Even some key Republicans, including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky and Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming, the No. 3 House Republican, either have abandoned Trump or appear to be ready to do so, potentially imperiling his political future altogether.How effective Trump’s efforts to run a shadow presidency will be depends almost entirely on whether he retains his one true superpower: inspiring fealty in some 74 million followers. As the FBI and federal prosecutors uncover more details about the attack on the U.S. Capitol and arrest mounting numbers of suspected rioters, charging some with sedition, some Trump supporters have started to peel away.“They were told that they were patriots, American heroes, following in the footsteps of George Washington, fighting for liberty and truth with authoritative leaders to guide them. Then they find out that it was all hollow and evil,” said Jennifer L. Hochschild, H.L. Jayne Professor of Government at Harvard, who studies misinformation and right-wing populist movements around the world. “Some are realizing that this insurrection, if not their previous years of Trump support, was wrong — both morally and factually.”With core elements of Trump’s base, including those in the military, the FBI, and the business community, now dumping him (though Hochschild notes that few religious leaders, especially Evangelical ministers, have spoken up: “That is shocking to me,” she says), that momentum may encourage more and more Trump supporters to also step away.,“If they join in a more or less unified declaration that ‘You are not a bad person for having supported Trump in the past, but now he has gone over the edge, and we must jettison him/them because they are hurting our beloved country,’ that could ease people’s ability to reject radicalized Republicanism without having to have a conversion experience (which few have),” she said.How the country will fare with a sidelined ex-president who’s trying to retake the office that he has convinced his supporters was stolen from him is genuinely “uncharted waters,” said Logevall. “But my guess is his efforts may have rather less effect than we’re imagining and fearing. His heart may not be in it, for one thing; even if it is, we may find that he’s a spent force, that the sense of invincibility he used to such effect for four years has been forever shattered.”Where our politics is going in the coming months will depend on whether Trump can still run for office and is allowed back on social media, especially Twitter, which cut him off for making false and incendiary claims, says Theda Skocpol, Ph.D. ’75, Victor S. Thomas Professor of Government and Sociology, who has extensively studied political views in “Red State” America.If not, and the Biden administration successfully handles the dual COVID public health and economic crises, then those Republicans who want to back away from Trump’s “authoritarianism will make headway,” she said. But, “If Trump remains a strong public voice, GOP radicalism may prevail and eventually destroy our competitive electoral system. Either way, there will be political violence, mostly from the Right, for months to come.”center_img Related Impeachment: What this means, where this leads Harvard experts ponder some of the toughest questions in play for the presidency, Congress, publiclast_img read more

Campaign infractions delay results

first_imgStudents cast their votes Monday for student body president and vice president, but they will not learn the results of the election until later in the week due to an alleged rule violated by one of the candidates. The results of Monday’s election will not be released until the Student Union completes its review of the allegation, Michael Thomas, vice president of elections for Judicial Council, said. “The election results will be announced as soon as the allegation process is complete,” Thomas said. “We are working to get that process done as soon as possible.” The Student Body Constitution mandates all information about allegations must remain confidential until the entire process of reviews and appeals in complete, Thomas said. The name of the candidates in question, the type of allegation and the nature of the sanction will not be released at this time. Thomas said the information is confidential so the election results do not sway anyone involved in the allegation and appeal processes. When an allegation is made against a candidate in the student body elections, it is brought before the Election Committee for review. The Election Committee met Monday evening to discuss the allegation against the candidate. The committee decided the ticket was in violation of the constitution and would receive a sanction, Thomas said. The candidates on the ticket then appealed the committee’s decision. “The Student Senate will have 48 hours from the time of the filing of the appeal to convene to hear the appeal,” Thomas said. The senators will first vote to decide to hear the appeal after brief presentations from Judicial Council and the candidate in question. “This basically works like a screening process,” Thomas said. “They decide if the appeal is legitimate.” If the Senate votes to hear the appeal, the ticket can call witnesses before the Senate and must answer questions about the allegation. After reviewing the appeal, the senators will make a final decision. “The senators can make one of two decisions,” Thomas said. “They can vote to uphold the original decision of the election committee, or they can choose to force the Election Committee to reconvene within 24 hours for the purpose of reconsidering the allegation.” After the steps of this process are complete, the Judicial Council will release the election results. The constitution requires a ticket to earn 50 percent of the vote to win the election, and with five teams on the ballot, Thomas said a runoff election is likely between the two tickets to earn the greatest number of votes. Details about a runoff election would be arranged after the results of Monday’s election are released.,Students cast their votes Monday for student body president and vice president, but they will not learn the results of the election until later in the week due to an alleged rule violated by one of the candidates. The results of Monday’s election will not be released until the Student Union completes its review of the allegation, Michael Thomas, vice president of elections for Judicial Council, said. “The election results will be announced as soon as the allegation process is complete,” Thomas said. “We are working to get that process done as soon as possible.” The Student Body Constitution mandates all information about allegations must remain confidential until the entire process of reviews and appeals in complete, Thomas said. The name of the candidates in question, the type of allegation and the nature of the sanction will not be released at this time. Thomas said the information is confidential so the election results do not sway anyone involved in the allegation and appeal processes. When an allegation is made against a candidate in the student body elections, it is brought before the Election Committee for review. The Election Committee met Monday evening to discuss the allegation against the candidate. The committee decided the ticket was in violation of the constitution and would receive a sanction, Thomas said. The candidates on the ticket then appealed the committee’s decision. “The Student Senate will have 48 hours from the time of the filing of the appeal to convene to hear the appeal,” Thomas said. The senators will first vote to decide to hear the appeal after brief presentations from Judicial Council and the candidate in question. “This basically works like a screening process,” Thomas said. “They decide if the appeal is legitimate.” If the Senate votes to hear the appeal, the ticket can call witnesses before the Senate and must answer questions about the allegation. After reviewing the appeal, the senators will make a final decision. “The senators can make one of two decisions,” Thomas said. “They can vote to uphold the original decision of the election committee, or they can choose to force the Election Committee to reconvene within 24 hours for the purpose of reconsidering the allegation.” After the steps of this process are complete, the Judicial Council will release the election results. The constitution requires a ticket to earn 50 percent of the vote to win the election, and with five teams on the ballot, Thomas said a runoff election is likely between the two tickets to earn the greatest number of votes. Details about a runoff election would be arranged after the results of Monday’s election are released.last_img read more

University releases schedule of events to celebrate Fr. Hesburgh

first_imgA week of events on campus will celebrate the life of University President Emeritus Fr. Theodore Hesburgh, according to an email sent to students today from Erin Hoffmann Harding, vice president of student affairs.A major memorial tribute will be held Wednesday at Purcell Pavilion, and tickets will be available for students Sunday from 5 to 8 p.m. in Stepan Center. Tickets will be distributed on a first come, first served basis and there is a limit of one ticket per student, the email said.On Monday, the Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament will be held in the Basilica of the Sacred Heart. The Basilica will be open for a night of remembrance and prayer from 7 to 9 p.m., the email said.Public visitation will be open to all who wish to pay respects to Fr. Hesburgh on Tuesday from 12 to 6 p.m. and Wednesday morning from 9 p.m. to 10 a.m., according to the email. Undergraduate students will have designated visitation hours based on their residence halls, but students are not restricted to these specific hours, the email said. Hoffmann Harding advised that all other public visitation hours could have a lengthy line for entry and asked that attendees allow time to clear security and proceed through the Basilica.An invitation-only wake service will be held in the Basilica on Tuesday at 7:30 p.m., the email said, but will be live-streamed on the web and to various locations on campus.Classes at Notre Dame will be canceled Wednesday after at 12:20 for the funeral Mass and memorial service.A traditional Holy Cross funeral Mass will be held for Fr. Hesburgh on Wednesday at 2 p.m. in the Basilica of the Sacred Heart, the email said. The Mass will be invitation-only but will also be live-streamed on the web and to various locations on campus.Following the Mass, there will be a procession from the Basilica to the Holy Cross Community Cemetery. Students are encouraged to line the path the procession will take to pay their final respects to Fr. Hesburgh, the email said. Students will be receiving instructions from their residence halls to meet and participate in the event together, according to the email, while other students can gather on Bond Quad before the end of the funeral Mass to walk to the procession.The ticketed memorial tribute will take place Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. at Purcell Pavilion and will be streamed live online and to various campus locations, the email said.According to the email, graduate, professional and post-doctoral students will be able to watch the live-stream of the wake service, funeral Mass and memorial tribute in DeBartolo Hall, room 141. All students are able to watch the events live in the LaFortune Student Center main lounge and in their respective residence halls, the email said. Graduate students who reside in the Fischer O’Hara Grace Community Center can watch the live-streams of the events in the Fischer O’Hara Grace Community Center, the email said. University Village residents can watch the events in the Beichner Community Center, the email said. Students, faculty, staff, alumni and community members are invited to watch the funeral Mass and memorial tribute live from the Compton Family Ice Arena, according to the email.For more information on the memorial events, visit http://hesburgh.nd.eduTags: Basilica of the Sacred Heart, celebration, Compton Family Ice Arena, Funeral, Hesburgh, LaFortune Student Center, Mass, memorial, Purcell Pavilion, Remembrance, tributelast_img read more

Student body president delivers State of the Student Union Address

first_imgWith student government turnover on the horizon, student body president senior Gates McGavick reflected on his administration’s accomplishments in a State of the Student Union address Wednesday evening in the LaFortune Ballroom.In an effort to promote student government transparency and student body engagement, McGavick and student body vice president senior Corey Gayheart opened the event to the public for the first time.McGavick opened by noting improved student government accessibility as a particular focus of his administration. To encourage greater student body engagement, McGavick said he, Gayheart and chief of staff senior Briana Tucker met with groups around campus once a week over lunch.“It quickly became the favorite part of our week,” McGavick said. “We feel it’s important that student government’s connected to more of its students.”The administration also pushed for a greater presence on social media, he added.“We posted more frequently on every platform than any previous administration in Notre Dame’s history,” he said.McGavick said these efforts, as well as his team’s commitment to live streaming student senate and other public meetings, have made strides in improving student government’s online visibility.“More student are getting information from student government than ever before,” he said. “More students are interacting with student government online than ever before.”The McGavick-Gayheart administration also collaborated with the University on several of their initiatives this year, McGavick said.The team worked closely with Campus Dining to make changes at the dining halls as well as at retail dining locations. Most notably, McGavick said, their work with Campus Dining helped bring Pizza Pi, a new restaurant expected to open in May, to campus.“We were thrilled to work with [Campus Dining director Chris Abayasinghe] on Pizza Pi, the restaurant replacing Reckers in the spring, which will offer alcohol to students over 21,” McGavick said.Partnering with the Notre Dame Police Department, student government also held its first Campus Safety Summit last fall, where students were able to speak with a panel of campus safety representatives. McGavick said student government plans to host a similar event later this semester.McGavick said he considers promoting diversity on campus to be another one of his administration’s greatest accomplishments. The Diversity Council helped to organize and co-sponsor a number of events promoting multiculturalism and inclusion, including Walk the Walk Week and Race Relations Week, he said. He and Gayheart also recently met with the Board of Trustees to discuss the results of the Inclusive Campus Climate Survey, he added.“We believe it is of utmost importance that Notre Dame be … committed to fostering a more diverse, more inclusive culture,” he said.Moving on, McGavick commended student senate for its work this year, which he said passed a number of significant resolutions.“The senate recently passed a resolution recognizing Notre Dame as being built on Potawatomi land,” he said. The resolution was “an important sign of respect” to the Potawatomi people, McGavick added.Senate also passed a resolution to include a module on sustainability in the Moreau First Year Experience as well as a resolution calling for professors to include mental health resources in their syllabi.“Students who need help, especially those who have just arrived at college, should be able to get it,” McGavick said.McGavick said he was especially proud of his administration’s “fiscal prudence.”“Our budget this year was tens of thousands of dollars lower than the last student governments’ budgets,” he said.He also noted his team’s commitment to political neutrality, particularly their policy to not comment on national political events not directly related to the University, encouraging future administrations to do the same.“A partisan student government is inherently liable to value the opinions of some students over others,” he said. “To avoid this unfair outcome, we believe it is absolutely imperative that student government continue to be an apolitical organization.”Despite this, McGavick said he felt it was important for his administration to take a stance against former Cardinal Theodore McCarrick, who was accused of sexual abuse last June and officially defrocked by the Vatican via a canonical trial in February.Since allegations against McCarrick surfaced, several members of the Notre Dame community urged the University to revoke the honorary degree awarded to him in 2008. Student government joined those voices in February with an Observer Letter to the Editor calling for the removal of the degree and holding meetings with Campus Ministry and other University organizations on the matter, McGavick said.Though the University revoked the degree following the results of the canonical trial, McGavick criticized it for not acting sooner. If the University is to celebrate its past as a moral leader, McGavick said, it must continue to act in accordance with its Catholic mission.“Our moral victories cannot exist only in the past,” he said.McGavick and Gayheart’s term will end April 1, when president and vice-president elect junior Elizabeth Boyle and sophomore Patrick McGuire will officially take office. McGavick said though he and Gayheart leave the student union in “strong” condition, he looks forward to what Boyle and McGuire will accomplish.“If you don’t know Elizabeth and Pat … know this: they’re passionate, hard-working and deeply devoted to the well-being of this community,” he said.Tags: McGavick-Gayheart, state of the student union address, Student governmentlast_img read more