Throwback When Anil Ambani broke up with Tina Munim under family pressure

first_imgThe love story of former Bollywood actress Tina Munim and business tycoon Anil Ambani well could have been a plot of some Bollywood movie. Though the couple went through a lot of rough patches at the beginning of their relationship, once they got married, there was no looking back for the two. And three decades later, they have made our belief in love conquers all, even more, stronger.In a freewheeling chat with Simi Garewal, Tina Ambani and Anil Ambani had bared their souls out on their love story and how they reached the decision to marry. Anil and Tina met for the first time at a party where Anil was taken aback by seeing her in a black saree as it was quite unconventional for anyone to turn up for a wedding wearing black. Both were introduced to each other and Anil didn’t waste time and immediately asked her out. Tina, who was not looking out for a relationship then, politely turned him down.When many years later, they again met, Tina was left in awe of his personality and simplicity. Anil too was impressed by her beauty and genuineness. The duo started meeting more often and love-struck. However, when Anil’s family got the whiff of it, they weren’t too fond of the match. Anil’s family had certain notions about people from the film industry and they pressurised the two to stop seeing each other.Anil being an obedient son agreed and the duo called it off for some time. But, in their hearts, they were still together. Though the duo didn’t speak for four years, they never tried to get attached to anyone else. Meanwhile, Anil kept refusing all the proposals which were coming his way and finally managed to persuade his family to accept Tina into the family.last_img read more

Harrison Announces BPD Crime Plan

first_imgBy Sean Yoes, AFRO Baltimore Editor, syoes@afro.comOn July 24, Baltimore had reported 182 homicides, a grisly pace, which could lead to the eclipse of the record of 343 murders in 2017 and the fifth year in a row of 300 homicides.In the midst of another year of prolific violence last week, the AFRO asked the question, “What’s the Plan to Reduce Violence?”  Baltimore Police Department Commissioner Michael Harrrison released details of the department’s crime plan on the same day, July 18, we published that story.“First, our deployment strategy will be guided by the following principles: a community oriented policing approach that emphasizes working with the community; number two, a problem oriented approach that encourages officers to focus on ways to fight crime; number three its intelligence led policing that focuses on using criminal intelligence and research analysis to drive operational and deployment decisions, an enhanced guardianship, which focuses on more visible police presence in the community, to include more foot patrols in our micro zones, business checks in high crime areas and regular attendance at community meetings,” said Harrison during a press conference where he outlined the broadest themes of the crime fighting strategy. During that press conference, flanked by several city leaders, including Baltimore City State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby, Harrison went further.“We need to consider not just where crime is occurring, but when it is happening. Using data driven approaches district by district, our command staff will be directing our efforts to focus on specific days of the week, times of the day and locations where crimes are being committed most frequently over the previous six months,” Harrison said.“In our new vision for the department we have now established a path for making us one of the finest police departments in the country. All of the issues that we face revolve around one of seven core focus areas: crime reduction, community engagement, consent decree compliance, creating a culture of accountability, connectivity or upgrading and improving the technology that we use, capacity building and central to everything communication.”“Baltimore Police Department Crime Reduction Strategy”last_img read more

Chimp study shows evidence of synaesthesia

first_img PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen Common chimpanzee in the Leipzig Zoo. Image credit: Thomas Lersch, via Wikipedia. The idea was to see if chimps associate high noises with light colored objects, as people tend to do, and low noises with dark colored objects. To find out, they trained six chimps to sit in front of a computer monitor and to play a matching game. In the game, three squares are displayed, a single small one in the center of the screen and two larger ones above it. The larger squares are identical except that they are either black or white. To get a treat, the chimp must correctly identify, by touch, which of the two larger squares matches the color of the smaller one. Then to test for synaesthesia they randomly played either a high noise or a low one while the chimp was trying to choose. The test was run over and over with the small square being shown for a very short period of time. Play A human participant and chimpanzee Ai performing the task. After tallying up the results, the researchers found that the chimps did slightly better (93% versus 90%) at choosing the right colored square when matching white squares with high notes and black ones with low. This, the researchers say, shows that chimps do have some innate sense of synaesthesia.These results by themselves may not by themselves truly answer the question of whether chimps really do have some degree of synaesthesia, but they do add to the body of research on the topic, all of which suggests that such abilities are innate, rather than learned, which means that such abilities may hold the key to explaining why humans developed complex speech and chimps and other animals have not.At any rate, after finishing up with the chimps, the team did the same study with humans, but because the volunteers were so accurate at choosing the right square, they weren’t able to draw any real conclusions regarding synaesthesia, but they did find that people seem to choose more speedily when the tones “matched” the colors displayed. Citation: Chimp study shows evidence of synaesthesia (2011, December 6) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-12-chimp-evidence-synaesthesia.html © 2011 PhysOrg.com Researches find poop-throwing by chimps is a sign of intelligencecenter_img (PhysOrg.com) — In the never-ending struggle to understand how the human brain works, all manner of experiments are dreamed up and carried out. In one new one, for example, researchers in Japan have been testing chimps to see if they possess brain connections that cross the senses. In human terms, it’s known as synaesthesia, the phenomenon where a person associates one sensation with another; feeling colors for example or associating higher musical tones with lighter colored objects. Vera Ludwig, a German researcher, has teamed with colleagues at Kyoto University in testing chimps to see if they have such traits. In their study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team describes how chimps did better or worse matching colored objects when a high or low noise was played. More information: Visuoauditory mappings between high luminance and high pitch are shared by chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and humans, PNAS, December 5, 2011, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1112605108AbstractHumans share implicit preferences for certain cross-sensory combinations; for example, they consistently associate higher-pitched sounds with lighter colors, smaller size, and spikier shapes. In the condition of synesthesia, people may experience such cross-modal correspondences to a perceptual degree (e.g., literally seeing sounds). So far, no study has addressed the question whether nonhuman animals share cross-modal correspondences as well. To establish the evolutionary origins of cross-modal mappings, we tested whether chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) also associate higher pitch with higher luminance. Thirty-three humans and six chimpanzees were required to classify black and white squares according to their color while hearing irrelevant background sounds that were either high-pitched or low-pitched. Both species performed better when the background sound was congruent (high-pitched for white, low-pitched for black) than when it was incongruent (low-pitched for white, high-pitched for black). An inherent tendency to pair high pitch with high luminance hence evolved before the human lineage split from that of chimpanzees. Rather than being a culturally learned or a linguistic phenomenon, this mapping constitutes a basic feature of the primate sensory system. Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more