Say Media Rebrands ReadWriteWeb as ReadWrite

first_imgIn his note, Lyons adds that coverage will double down on mobile: “Mobile devices combined with social networks are evolving into a new mass medium that will displace television and define our age.”Content will also be contributed by a growing base of writers, including readers, says the company. Say Media, which operates a number of digital properties across fashion, technology, food and living verticals, has rebranded the web trends and tech reporting site ReadWriteWeb to the shorter ReadWrite. The site has also hired Dan Lyons as its new editor-in-chief. Lyons was previously a columnist for Newsweek and was responsible for the Fake Steve Jobs blog. The rebranding comes about 10 months after Say Media bought the site and includes a new tablet-first, responsive design built on a proprietary CMS called Orion.Lyons replaces founding editor Richard MacManus who started the site from New Zealand in 2003 and left mid-October to begin work on a book.  In an introductory editor’s note, Lyons says the new name reflects a broader focus: “As for our new name, the rationale for the change is pretty simple. Technology has evolved beyond the Web, and we’re adapting to keep up with the changing digital media landscape.”last_img read more

PIC Deepika Padukone Ranveer Singh lock lips onstage picture goes viral

first_imgInstagramBollywood’s power couple Deepika Padukone and Ranveer Singh have been flying high and how! The duo not only has given probably their career-best performance last year (Ranveer Singh as Khilji and Deepika Padukone as Rani Padmini in Padmaavat) but, also have established themselves as the most sought after stars in the filmy world.Right when their films had released, the industry had predicted that this year all the awards would belong to the two of them and rightly so! As the award season has begun so has the two taking home some shining awards.At the recently held Vimal Filmfare awards, Ranveer Singh won the best actor award. Deepika Padukone handed him the trophy to which, Ranveer Singh said, “This Black Lady (award) is very special to me, but this lady (Deepika) is the most special lady to have ever happened to me, I love you, are you proud of me?” He further added, “I dedicate this award to my nani as it was my nani as favourite character. One day I called my sister and asked what nani is doing, she said that nani is on terrace doing her favourite thing that is watching Padmavaat.”Ranveer won the award for playing Alauddin Khilji in Padmaavat which went through a lot of controversies before its release. Ayushmann Khurrana won the Best Actor (Critics) award for Andhadhun. Despite a superlative performance, Deepika Padukone lost out to Alia Bhatt who won the Best Actress award for Raazi. Neena Gupta won the Best Actress award (Critics) for Badhai Ho.Alia Bhatt too proclaimed her love for Ranbir Kapoor while accepting the award. Bhatt called Ranbir her ‘special one’ and blew a kiss at him. Ranbir was left blushing with Alia’s special gesture of love.last_img read more

Come up to protect constitutional rights Kamal

first_imgKamal Hossain speaks at the inaugural session of Gonoforum`s fifth national council in the capital`s Mohanagar Natya Mancha on Friday. Photo: Dipu MalakarGonoforum president Kamal Hossain on Friday urged people to play the role of a watchdog as owner of the country to protect their constitutional rights and make the government accountable.”The constitution has guaranteed people’s rights as owner of the country. We must get organised and guard our rights,” said.Kamal came up with the remarks while speaking at the inaugural session of Gonoforum’s fifth national council.He said no one, including the president and the prime minister, is above the constitution. “We must register our protest if anything is done beyond the constitution. We must make the government accountable. Or else, we’ll lose our ownership of the country.”The Gonoforum chief said people must remain aware about the way the country is being run. “We’ll have to be careful so that the police play its due role. All must discharge their duties obeying the constitution.”Kamal said the police can help ensure democratic and constitutional rule in the country by playing its proper role.As the owners of the country, he said people have some responsibilities to enjoy their ownership “We must get organised and play an active role in ensuring good governance and the rule of law in the country.”The Gonoforum president said people will have to force the government to run the country as per the constitution with their united efforts.Depicting the country’s overall situation, Kamal urged people not to get frustrated. “The victory of people is certain.”The council began at Mohanagar Natya Mancha in the morning with party president Kamal Hossain in the chair.Kamal together with party senior leaders inaugurated the council by hoisting the national and Gonoforum flags around 10:00am.Several hundred party delegates from across the country joined the event.The last council of Gonoforum was held on 10 December, 2011.last_img

Lack of sleep makes people angry

first_imgLosing just a couple hours of sleep at night makes you angrier, especially in frustrating situations, a study has found. Other studies have shown a link between sleep and anger, but questions remained about whether sleep loss was to blame or if anger was responsible for disrupted sleep, said Zlatan Krizan, a professor at Iowa State University in the US. The research answers those questions and provides new insight on our ability to adjust to irritating conditions when tired. Also Read – Add new books to your shelf”Despite typical tendencies to get somewhat used to irritating conditions – an uncomfortable shirt or a barking dog – sleep-restricted individuals actually showed a trend toward increased anger and distress, essentially reversing their ability to adapt to frustrating conditions over time. No one has shown this before,” Krizan said. Study participants were randomly split into two groups: one maintained their normal sleep routine and the second restricted their sleep by two to four hours each night for two nights. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveThose who maintained averaged almost seven hours of sleep a night, while the restricted group got about four and a half hours each night. The difference reflects sleep loss we regularly experience in everyday life, Krizan said. To measure anger, researchers had participants come to the lab – before and after sleep manipulation – to rate different products while listening to brown noise or white noise. Krizan said the purpose was to create uncomfortable conditions, which tend to provoke anger. “In general, anger was substantially higher for those who were sleep restricted. We manipulated how annoying the noise was during the task and as expected, people reported more anger when the noise was more unpleasant,” said Krizan. “When sleep was restricted, people reported even more anger, regardless of the noise,” he said. It is well established that sleep loss increases negative emotions, such as anxiety and sadness, and decreases positive emotions, such as happiness and enthusiasm, Krizan said. Researchers measured these effects to more generally understand the relationship between sleep, anger and emotions. They also tested whether subjective sleepiness explained more intense feelings of anger. Sleepiness accounted for 50 per cent of experimental effect of sleep restriction on anger, suggesting individuals’ sense of sleepiness may point to whether they are likely to become angered.last_img read more

Casey Researchs Chief Energy Investment Strategis

first_imgCasey Research’s Chief Energy Investment Strategist, Marin Katusa, whose portfolio profited nicely the last time the uranium bull broke loose a decade ago, recently interviewed a group of world-renowned energy experts to discuss the prospects for the sector that some considered doomed by the Fukushima disaster. Anti-nuclear power sentiment has by no means evaporated, but Katusa sees clear signals that the bulls are ready to run, not least of which is the recent attack on the Somair uranium mine in Niger. Why? First, the 20-year Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) Program agreement between the U.S. and Russia, aka “Megatons to Megawatts,” expires this year. Second, the end of that program will allow Russia to sell its coveted uranium, which currently powers one of every 10 homes in the U.S., to the highest bidder. With 200 nuclear power plants under construction or on the drawing boards, China is likely to be first in line, with India and even oil-rich Saudi Arabia on its heels. Third, the increase in nuclear plants being built around the world will stimulate huge demand while supply inevitably dwindles. Because it can take a decade to bring a uranium mine on-line, new mining production can’t grow fast enough to meet the demand. Fourth, like it or not, nuclear energy is clean—while the average coal-fired power plant in the U.S. emits nearly 4 million metric tons of CO2 each year, nuclear power plants emit no carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, mercury or other toxic gases. Finally, last Thursday, an Al-Qaeda splinter group attacked the Somair uranium mine in Niger—owned by French uranium giant Areva. This will further disrupt global uranium supplies and emphasizes what the energy experts have been saying: Uranium is prime for price increases. Casey Research agreed to share Katusa’s segment with Sprott U.S. Holdings Chairman Rick Rule with The Energy Report readers and invites you to listen to the rest. Marin Katusa: We first met 10 years ago, when you were begging people to buy uranium companies, and the market boomed. Those of us who followed your advice made a lot of money. Are you expecting a replay in that market? Rick Rule: I think so. The similarities are interesting. At that time, the price of uranium on the market was less than what it cost to produce it, which meant that one of two things would happen: Either the uranium price would go up, or the lights would go out. Those were the only two choices. We’re in a situation now where the uranium price on world markets is lower than what’s required to bring online the supplies needed to keep the lights on around the world. So once again, either the uranium price goes up, or the lights go out. I think the price will go up. MK: What can you tell investors who are nervous about uranium? Nuclear power is unpopular. Why should investors expect its feedstock to have this massive bull market? RR: You make money in financial markets by buying low and selling high, and you can’t buy low when something is universally loved and every investor is competing with you. You have to buy things when they are unloved. In natural resources, you can be a contrarian or a victim. You had the good sense of getting into the market when uranium was cheap, and you also had the good sense to get out when everybody else was flocking in. You did what you were supposed to—buy it when it was out of favor and sell it when it came into favor. It’s out of favor again. You will make money buying it now and selling again when it returns to favor, because it will. MK: Are you currently investing in companies that are exploring for and producing uranium in the junior resource sector? RR: We are. We are investing in the broader junior resource sector because it is universally unloved, and we are specifically investing in the uranium sector. We invest in any commodity where the selling price on global markets is less than the cost of production and where we see ongoing demand. The price has to rise to meet demand. MK: Considering that China is on its way to building twice as many nuclear reactors as America, India is building theirs and Saudi Arabia—which is so rich in oil and gas—is planning on building 16 nuclear reactors, does that make the argument for uranium better today than it was 10 years ago? RR: I wouldn’t argue that it’s better, because the situation 10 years ago was superb. But it doesn’t have to be better. A lot of people added a zero to their net worth as a consequence of that market. If they increase their net worth only five times, would that be sufficient? MK: I think it would. Like uranium, the junior resource sector is not popular. How would you advise people to invest in that sector today? RR: They have to invest in themselves before they invest in the sector. They have to get educated about natural resources and you don’t get educated about natural resources in The Wall Street Journal. These businesses differ from other businesses. You need the courage and the common sense to invest in contrarian fashion. You need to buy out-of-favor sectors and once your thesis has been vindicated and you’re feeling smart, you need to sell those sectors. It’s very important that you both buy low and sell high. Industry cycles in natural resources are very predictable, and after you discipline yourself, find information sources you can trust and figure out how to use those information sources, you will find the sector extremely generous. MK: What is the most important factor when you look at a company? When Rick Rule and Sprott write a check with their own money into a company, what’s the most important element of that investment decision? RR: If it’s a speculative, junior company, the three most important factors are people, people and people. In the uranium sector for example, when the resource became popular in the middle part of the last decade, there were 500 junior uranium companies but only 20 competent teams. MK: And of those 500 companies, about 480 disappeared. RR: Another thing that argues in your favor today is that you’re now able to come in and buy companies with $50M market caps that spent $250–300M they raised cheaply during the boom. Those are very attractive propositions. MK: Can anything derail this nuclear renaissance? RR: If there’s a black swan on the nuclear side, it would be another event like Fukushima, Chernobyl or Three Mile Island. On the financial side, it would be another 2008-style psychotic break. But if that happened, your uranium portfolio would be probably the least of your concerns. MK: As always, Rick, it was a pleasure. Thank you. Uranium prices have nowhere to go but up. Rick confirmed that, as do the other experts in the videocast. Listen for the insights from: Spencer Abraham, who served as the 10th U.S. Secretary of Energy (2001-2005) during the George W. Bush Administration. Lady Barbara Thomas Judge, chairman emeritus of the U.K. Atomic Energy Authority, chairman of the Pension Protection Fund, and U.K. business ambassador on behalf of U.K. Trade and Investment, and is an appointed member of the TEPCO Nuclear Reform Monitoring Committee. Herb Dhaliwal, former Canadian minister of natural resources and senior regional minister for British Columbia. Amir Adnani, co-founder and CEO of Uranium Energy Corp. (UEC:NYSE.MKT), which operates North America’s newest uranium mine; located in South Texas, it’s the first new uranium production in the U.S. in seven years. Casey Research has identified the top three undervalued uranium stocks that you should invest in right now to be well positioned for the coming uranium bull market. Compiled into a special report, Three Must-Own Uranium Stocks, Casey is making this time-sensitive special report available exclusively for viewers of this webinar.last_img read more

first_img – — A World Gone Mad Even a cursory glance at the headlines should give any thinking person pause. While I consider myself an optimist over the long run, I am considerably less so over the short-to-intermediate period. Of course, these things are all relative and, in many cases, based on geography. Living in Aspen, provided you can afford it, would give you an entirely different perspective than what you’d have from living in the ’hood of Chicago or Detroit. In Aspen, your biggest challenge of the day might be deciding which upscale hash house to dine at. By contrast, in Chicago or Detroit that challenge might be getting to the grocery store and back in one piece. Likewise, living in Argentina, especially as an expat with a few bucks in your jeans, life runs to the idyllic with a rare cultural harmony. In Europe, on the other hand, the citizenry is under siege from a politically contrived invasion from the Middle East and Africa. Life(style) & Liberty In Argentina, people enjoy an extremely high quality of life thanks, in no small part, to low prices and the excellent quality of the food (and wine, for that matter…) which is among the best in the world. This is especially true in a small town such as that of Cafayate, where a group I am part of has built a truly exceptional lifestyle community. In Cafayate, most of what you eat comes from family farms in the valley or just beyond. Back in the “first world” the opposite is true, with high prices and increasingly low-quality produce and meat, as often as not coming from industrial-scale operations. Then there is the steadily encroaching police state in the United States and, increasingly, in Europe. In these places, people are actively afraid of the militarized police. Here in Argentina, outside of some of the more densely populated barrios in Buenos Aires, the crime rate is among the lowest in the world. In the scenic Northwest where La Estancia de Cafayate is located, crime is pretty much non-existent. In the U.S., a dangerous meme has arisen that the military and police should be treated like a special class. Here, as blowback to the excesses of the military government 30 years back, the police and military are reviled or simply ignored by the public, relegated to a far more appropriate role as night watchmen. A Refreshing Lack of Political Correctness Sometimes I can’t believe the articles people email me from the U.S. can be true, but they are. For example, about how one public figure or another has their career ruined for the ginned-up “offense” of speaking their mind about a politically sensitive topic. There is even talk about arresting people who doubt the bad science behind global warming. And a truly perverse culture has grown up around universities where even the slightest perceived slight, a “microaggression,” of a real or fabricated minority sets off a firestorm. I’m happy to report that, so far, political correctness has gained almost no foothold here. I always find it amusing that people still call each other by nicknames such as gordo (fatty), negro (dark-skinned), flaca (skinny), pelado (baldy), and so forth. And no one gets offended in the slightest. Just as it should be. But I fear things in the degraded democracies are only going to get worse. Fortunately, Argentina saw the light and got rid of its version of Hillary Clinton and, hopefully, won’t make that mistake again for many years to come. It Gets Worse Nobody would deny that there is the equivalent of a terrorist Olympics under way. No one can know where these malcontents are going to strike next, or how. But you know the next attack is coming, and that they will continue to come, probably for decades. Of course, the odds of you or anyone you know dying from a terrorist attack are approximately the same as hitting your head after slipping on a toad. The real danger is from the inevitable overreaction of the Deep State, the thick layer of bureaucracy now running the world, to these attacks. Imagine the immediate consequences of a large bomb going off in a major seaport? Or a successful drone attack on some high-value target? Or, or… If the attack is serious enough, and sooner or later it will be, legions of security apparatchiks would slam the borders shut before your morning coffee hit the counter. Remember the empty skies after 9/11? Personally, I just don’t want to live in that world. And, so, I don’t. Doug Casey Editor’s note: Today and tomorrow, we’re sharing an insightful piece from Casey Research founder Doug Casey on his favorite place in the world. As you’ll see, it’s a place well worth hearing about. Doug is well traveled, having been to 155 countries, many of them numerous times. But he decided to build a freedom-lover’s paradise here… What my favorite place in the world doesn’t have…  Cultural conflicts  An immigration crisis  Political correctness  High prices What it does have will surprise you… Reading the news while enjoying a cortado at a café in my favorite place in the world often causes cognitive dissonance. How, I ask myself, can life here be so tranquil when the rest of the world appears gripped by madness? As you might suspect, the café is located in Argentina. Sure, until recently, we had to put up with the antics of La Presidenta, Cristina Kirchner. But she was largely a bad joke ignored by Argentines with any intelligence. She’s gone now, replaced by the free-market-oriented engineer Mauricio Macri. While one can never know how these things turn out, from what I’ve seen so far, I think he’s going to make a huge difference in pretty much every way that counts. Maybe Argentina won’t return to its former position as the sixth-largest economy in the world, as was the case in the early 20th century, but the conditions are right for the economy to do a rocket shot. That’s usually the result when a new team sweeps away the spaghetti string of truly stupid socialist policies and lets an economy breathe. China’s decades of stunning growth following Deng’s liberalization provides a useful lesson. An Embarrassment of Riches Then there’s the proven fact that Argentina has an abundance of natural resources including gold, copper, oil, and natural gas. And there’s the famed Argentine agricultural land stretching from one end of the country to the other. There are few countries in the world with the ability to be completely self-sustaining—Argentina is one of those. Of personal importance to me, it also has a well-educated population, the most sophisticated in South America. Anyone worth knowing down here speaks two, three, or more languages. That is due, in part, to the country’s legacy as one of only a handful of immigrant cultures in the world. Just like the U.S., Australia, New Zealand, and Canada. What these countries have in common (besides geographically secure borders) are that, in the early days, hardworking settlers from around the world flocked to the country’s wide-open spaces. In the case of Argentina, the indigenous population was largely overrun (it happens) by Spaniards, English, Italians, Germans, Irish, French, etc.—rugged pioneer types who set out to the new world to make their mark. Unlike the current mess in Europe where the immigrants have brought their bad habits with them and refuse to assimilate, in Argentina the newcomers culturally assimilated into the modern Argentine. Generally speaking, a confident, lively, and fun-loving sort who, like the Europe of old, work to live, not the other way around. Returning to the beginning of this letter, Argentina is a “café society,” where people love sharing ideas over leisurely lunches and late dinners. They enjoy life a lot, even when saddled with a poor government such as the one we’ve just seen the back of. There is a reason that, out of all the places in the world I really enjoy, Argentina has filled that spot for many years now. There are other reasons I’ll get back to in a moment but first, back to the cognitive dissonance. Wall Street’s Dirty Little Stock Pattern On April 25, 2016, FINRA required Wall Street to release additional proprietary data on their “secret” trading activity. For more than a decade, Wall Street kept this data on how the most profitable firms invest to itself. And the pattern our research team uncovered when they analyzed it for the first time shocked us… YOU can use it to predict, several days in advance, which stocks are setting up to soar on the stock market.center_img Recommended Links Bonanza-Grade Gold Discovery Now Set To Go LIVE Everyone knows that deadlines in mining—just like technology and biotechnology—can mean huge gains for small stocks that own big breakthroughs. We have been tracking one such breakthrough—and a looming deadline. This is the richest gold discovery we have ever seen in person. The last time something like this happened in 1988, investors in a company called Stikine Resources saw once-in-a-lifetime gains as the stock shot from $1 to $67 per share—a 6,600% increase. Click here for the full story. Editor’s note: Stay tuned for Part II tomorrow, where Doug will explain more about his favorite place…and how you can join him and a group of friends and guests there for an exclusive weeklong event next month.last_img read more

• International Speculator editor Dave Forest says

first_img• International Speculator editor Dave Forest says trade war fears are overblown… Dave is our in-house geologist. He knows more about commodities than anyone I know who’s not named Doug Casey, of course.And he had this to say about the trade war recently:Trade war fears are overblown. The U.S.-China trade dispute is no excuse to sit out the coming bull market in commodities. This is a trend you’ll want to keep on your radar for the foreseeable future.And there’s a simple reason for this.• China can’t afford to let the trade war escalate… It has one of the world’s fastest-growing economies. And it will soon have the largest middle class in the world.But its economy would come to a standstill without copper and nickel. Not only that, China gets most of these base metals from other countries.See for yourself. This is a chart that Dave and his team put together recently. The orange bars represent refined production, a proxy for demand. The blue bars show mine output, or domestic supply.You can see that refined production far exceeds mine output. This tells you just how much China depends on foreign sources for copper.• China’s nickel supply is even more dire… According to Dave, domestic mines supply only 14% of China’s nickel needs. Take a look.To make a long story short: China simply cannot allow the trade war to escalate. If it does, its entire economy would unravel.It shouldn’t come as a surprise that China is trying to deescalate matters. Dave wrote in last month’s issue of International Speculator:On September 30, China’s Ministry of Finance announced it is reducing general import tariffs on base metals and steel from 11.5% to 8.4%. The Ministry also announced duty cuts on a wider slate of minerals and gemstones from 6.6% to 5.4%.It’s also worth noting that China originally planned to impose a 25% tariff on liquified natural gas but later dropped the rate to 10%. Of course, supply is only one side of the coin…• Demand also needs to be strong for base metals prices to rise… I bring this up because many people think China’s economy is headed for a “hard landing.”But once again, Dave sees the situation differently:Recent reports from China suggest the government is moving quickly to cushion any blow from a trade-related economic slump.For one, officials at the national level have pushed forward new bond financing for local government infrastructure projects. That’s in stark contrast to the first half of 2018, when federal officials had been tightening financing to local developers.The Chinese government now appears intent on launching a new wave of economic stimulus projects. Approvals from China’s National Development and Reform Commission have seen a sharp lift since July – coinciding almost exactly with the escalation of the trade war.In other words, Dave believes China’s economy is in much better shape than people realize.When you combine that with lower tariffs, you have the ingredients for much higher metals prices.Most people don’t realize this. All they hear about is how the trade war is intensifying and how China is headed for a major economic slowdown. But Dave says those fears are wildly overblown.• So consider speculating on these base metals if you haven’t yet… You can easily do this by buying shares in a major mining company.Just be sure to treat any bet on higher commodity prices as a speculation. Only bet money that you can afford to lose. Use stop losses. And take profits when they come.I also encourage you to check out Dave’s research. He recently recommended the top stock to own as the trade war unfolds. It’s in a prime position to help China… and it has massive upside ahead. International Speculator subscribers can access the issue here.If you’re not a subscriber, you can access this pick by signing up today. And that’s not the only money-making opportunity you can take advantage of… Dave just released a new video about a breakthrough in electric vehicle tech that needs to be on your radar today. Watch the video and learn more about a subscription here.Regards,Justin Spittler New Orleans, LA November 29, 2018P.S. I also recommend reading Dave’s recent essays below. They all show that the commodities sector is gearing up for a rally. Read on to see the top metals that need to be in your portfolio today… Legendary Growth Investor Announces Major BUY SignalJust released: Louis Navellier just posted critical research about a massive market shift dead ahead. His last major buy alert turned $100,000 into $1.2 million in about one year. Now he’s sharing a NEW Buy Signal that could be his biggest ever. Don’t miss this chance to get his new alert before it goes offline. “It’s Time to Buy Silicon Valley’s Favorite Metal” China to CEO of World’s #1 Electric Car Company: You Lose.In the race to make electric cars cheaper than gas and diesel vehicles, the winner was always thought to be the #1 U.S. electric car company. But what China will do any day now could catapult it to the #1 spot… and solidify its position as the world leader. Reader MailbagYour comments continue to roll in on Doug Casey’s interview on the migrant caravan…Hey Doug. Been reading your stuff for 10 years. Generally enjoy it. Loved Ayn Rand in my 20s… now I see where it falls apart. I’m a Canadian millennial. Anyways. This article lacked empathy. I like when you write finance/economy articles because there isn’t much emotion in it. But when you apply your logic and rational thought to sensitive human subjects like the caravan it just comes across as mean, uncaring, and unloving. The idea that everything should be private property so you can kick the mooching homeless off all lawns is sad. I get it. I remember how Ayn Rand taught me about moochers and they suck the producers dry, forever taking. As a white educated male, it made sense to me! But not everyone is like me. Maybe that homeless guy is mentally ill. Maybe he got sick and lost everything. I have friends who are on government handouts because they lost their jobs. They don’t like how it feels and actively look for work so they can get off the “dole” but they appreciate it in the meantime so they can feed themselves and keep a roof over their head. Yes, that intent of government spending CAN work.Anyways. Just please try and have a bit more empathy for people. At the end of the day who knows why we are here and for what purpose, so lead with kindness. Can’t hurt…— Mike Recommended Link — By Justin Spittler, editor, Casey Daily DispatchThe trade war has claimed its biggest victim.…Apple (AAPL).Apple sells the wildly popular iPhone, iPad, and MacBook. It’s one of the most recognized companies on the planet. It was the world’s most valuable publicly traded company until Microsoft (MSFT) overtook it on Monday.So how did a company this powerful get caught up in the trade war? Simple. On Monday, President Trump threatened to introduce a 10% tariff on consumer electronic products made in China.This would impact the iPhone and other Apple products…• Trump did this because he thinks the Chinese are screwing the U.S. on trade… But more tariffs wouldn’t just hurt the Chinese. They’d hurt everyday Americans, too.This is because tariffs make imported goods more expensive. And if the iPhone becomes pricier, people will think twice about buying one.That’s the last thing Apple can afford. Recommended Linkcenter_img “Is the “Donald Trump of Asia” About to Send Nickel to the Moon?” — “Revealed: Silicon Valley’s Plan to Transform the Mining Industry” • Demand for the iPhone appears to be weakening… I say this because some of Apple’s suppliers recently cut forecasts. Apple has also reportedly canceled a production boost for its new iPhone XR model.This tells us the new iPhone model isn’t selling as well as expected.That’s triggered a huge sell-off. In fact, Apple is now trading 23% below its peak in early October. But it will surely head lower if Trump makes good on his threat to hit the iPhone with tariffs.Of course, Apple isn’t the only company that’s been hit hard by the trade war. Harley-Davidson, MillerCoors, and Jack Daniel’s have all been caught on the wrong side of tariffs.• The trade war is also making resource investors nervous… Just look at what copper’s been doing recently. Its price fell about 16% after Trump hit nearly $50 billion worth of Chinese imports with a 25% tariff in June. Other base metals were also hit by trade war concerns. Nickel, for instance, fell by 32% after Trump announced tariffs in June. Zinc plunged 23% over the same timeframe.Those are huge declines for such short periods. But they were totally unwarranted.You see, none of those metals were targeted in tariffs. Instead, finished products like lasers and laundry equipment were singled out. Still, that didn’t stop many investors from dumping these metals. In other words, the trade war isn’t something resource investors should fear… It’s an opportunity.But don’t take my word for it… Details here View his announcement here I read your views on the “migrant caravan” and some thoughts immediately come to mind. First and foremost, and completely overlooked in your piece, is the fact that millions of indigenous peoples from Central America were dispossessed of their lands, forced into slave labor, and when they refused, were murdered by American financed, ultra-right wing, neo-Nazi governments. These governments were largely installed by the CIA, backed and financed by America. Justice? I had the pleasure to work in Guatemala for a short period of time, and learned firsthand of the situation there, now and historically.Secondly, and you make reference to it, the situation in Europe today, with perhaps millions of “migrants” from north Africa. I think maybe the time has come to recognize this problem for what it really is. These are not migrants, they are largely refugees, fleeing an area which has been bombed “back to the stone age” by American and NATO forces, illegally. They have no homes to go back to, infrastructure has been destroyed, places of worship bombed, markets bombed, schools and hospitals bombed. Families destroyed, killed, split.America and the NATO countries are beginning to pay for their aggressions, and rightly so. At some point, some very prominent American and European leaders might well find themselves before an international court, in a vain attempt to justify their deeds. These are not nice things to contemplate, but responsibility eventually comes home. — DonAs always, if you have any questions or suggestions for the Dispatch, send them to us at feedback@caseyresearch.com.In Case You Missed It…Last night, Doug Casey joined Bill Bonner and Mark Ford in what was one of the most important events we’ve ever held. If you missed it, you can watch a free replay right here.last_img read more

Riskbased optimization scheme boosts confidence and profitability for future mixedtechnology power plants

Provided by KAUST A scheme to balance risks may help realize the benefits of being able to combine complementary power technologies, such as thermal generation, wind power and energy storage. Such benefits include lower capital costs and more responsive and reliable energy delivery while leveraging renewable energy technologies Optimizing the operation of a mixed-technology power plant is vital to make such power generation profitable and reliable. However, this is far more complex than for single-technology units due to the simultaneous fluctuations in generation caused by inconsistent wind, for example, as well as fluctuations in energy storage levels and market electricity prices. While optimization schemes have been proposed for such virtual power plants (VPPs), the existing approaches take a rigidly risk-neutral approach to dealing with uncertainty in future conditions. Now, by integrating risk parameters into an efficient optimization program for VPP operation, Ricardo Lima and colleagues Omar Knio and Ibrahim Hoteit from KAUST have developed a platform that allows the system to be tweaked for better reliability and profitability. “Renewable energy resources are inherently uncertain,” explains Lima. “The operation and interaction of these resources with the electricity market brings uncertainty about how to best maximize profit.” Furthermore, “this methodology enables us to capitalize on wind ensembles from weather forecast models, accounting for the uncertainties inherent in future projections,” says HoteitThe problem considered by Knio’s team is the optimization of operations and electricity market participation for a VPP comprising a thermal unit, such as a conventional gas-fired power plant, a wind farm and a pumped storage hydro unit for energy storage. The goal of the calculation is to predict the optimal energy output of the thermal unit and input/output from the hydro unit, with consideration for fluctuating wind conditions and electricity price in the market, which will optimize profit over the next few hours. “The key issue for optimization is always the balance between level of detail of the model and the capacity for obtaining optimal solutions from it,” says Lima. “In this work, we propose efficient approaches to solve large problems and push the limits of the problem sizes we can solve in reasonable computational times.”This is a large-scale calculation problem with many variables even before the inclusion of risk, which presents significant challenges for finding the most accurate solution. To be able to consider the additional complexity of risk, the team had to develop an efficient calculation scheme, which they achieved by calculating the two parts in parallel. The result is a framework that can accommodate both conservative risk-avoidance and aggressive risk-seeking approaches to maximize VPP profits.”Our optimization model supports the calculation of risk-averse decisions that hedge against low profits due to the uncertainty in future wind-power generation and electricity prices,” says Lima. Explore further Using an algorithm to reduce energy bills—rain or shine The challenge is the optimization of operations and electricity market participation for a VPP comprising a thermal unit, such as a conventional gas-fired power plant, a wind farm and a pumped storage hydro unit for energy storage. Credit: Xavier Pita Citation: Risk-based optimization scheme boosts confidence and profitability for future mixed-technology power plants (2018, April 13) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-04-risk-based-optimization-scheme-boosts-confidence.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. read more