Specks new CaseE is a painfully cute but tough iPad case

first_img Speck’s new kid-friendly iPad case has flexible arms Share your voice 12 Photos Now playing: Watch this: CES 2019 0 Enlarge ImageSpeck’s Case-E is scheduled to ship by March. Speck Remember Speck’s iGuy case for the iPad? Well, he’s evolved into the Case-E, a new iPad case that’s as kid-friendly as a case gets.Due to ship by the end of March, the Case-E costs $40 and has flexible hooked arms you can hold onto or wrap around car seats “for safe viewing on the go,” Speck says. Additionally, the exterior “squishy” layer is BPA free to “put parents’ minds at ease.”The Case-E will be available for the last five generations of 9.7-inch iPad devices and in multiple color options. There’s no word yet on international pricing. 1:07 Mobile Accessories CES 2019: See all of CNET’s coverage of the year’s biggest tech show.CES schedule: It’s six days of jam-packed events. Here’s what to expect. 85 Photos Some of the most anticipated tech for 2019 Post a comment Tags Here are its key specs:6-foot drop protection External EVA foam layer offers a soft, comfortable grip that’s easy to holdBoth sides of the case offer flexible, detachable EVO foam “arms” that provide a secure grip for even the smallest hands Arms prop up your iPad in landscape or portrait mode and can be used to secure the device to a vehicle’s headrest Price: $40 Multiple color options Shipping by the end of March CES Products All the cool new gadgets at CES 2019last_img read more

Twitters new dark mode gives you a darker choice

first_imgTwitter’s dark mode has now an option to turn your app’s background black. Twitter Twitter users have new options when it comes to how dark they want to make the app’s background.The social media company said Thursday it’s releasing a new dark mode for its iPhone app that turns the background black instead of blue-gray.Turning on dark mode not only gives your eyes a break from bright light, but can help save your phone’s battery life. Twitter first introduced a setting in 2016 to make it more comfortable to tweet in low light. But some people complained that Twitter’s dark mode wasn’t dark enough because it was only blue-gray.Now Twitter users have three choices: Dim, Lights Out and Automatic Dark Mode.Dim will turn your Twitter app’s background to the blue-gray color that the company introduced in 2016. Lights Out will turn the background to black and emits no light. Then there’s Automatic Dark Mode, which will automatically turn on the dark mode that you choose when the sun sets.Users can turn on Twitter’s dark mode by going to their account’s settings and clicking on “Display and sound.” Share your voice Post a comment Tags “Giving more people options to personalize their experience on Twitter based on what makes them most comfortable is what the latest update to Dark Mode is all about,” said Bryan Haggerty, Twitter’s senior design manager in a statement.   Mobile Tech Industry 0 It was dark. You asked for darker! Swipe right to check out our new dark mode. Rolling out today. pic.twitter.com/6MEACKRK9K— Twitter (@Twitter) March 28, 2019 Twitterlast_img read more

Harvey FloodDamaged Houston Synagogue Could Relocate

first_imgTwitter @RabbiWeilUnited Orthodox Synagogue of Houston after Harvey.Light peeking through stained glass windows illuminated the melancholy faces of the men of United Orthodox Synagogues as they put on their traditional tefillin and tallit to prepare for the temple’s last morning prayer. They bowed their heads alongside the women in the congregation, separated by a cloth partition.The Houston Chronicle reports after suffering damage from three floods in as many years, the synagogue’s board of directors made a decision to demolish the sanctuary, school wing and offices. More than 150 congregation members gathered or tuned in to a web stream for the Feb. 4 final service.“If someone had told me 10 years ago that it would all end like this, I would have thought they were telling a fantasy,” congregant Denise Weinberg said.The synagogue is located on Greenwillow Drive in the historic Jewish community in Meyerland, just hundreds of feet from Brays Bayou. About 1??in 13 Jewish families there — an estimated 2,000 households — were flooded by Hurricane Harvey.A tour through the synagogue makes clear the drastic effects of the floods of Memorial Day 2015, Tax Day 2016 and Harvey. Rust covers ovens in the kitchen. Watermarks stain memorial plaques that line the walls. In the library, only bare shelves remain after floodwaters ruined hundreds of sacred books.“You spend a whole lifetime collecting things that remind you of other things, just for the water to take it all away,” Weinberg said.In an effort to save their synagogue, United Orthodox had engineers look at the building, received the help of over 500 volunteers and had many fundraisers. Rabbi Adir Posy said residents of 46 states and four Canadian provinces donated $400,000. Posy has worked closely to help the synagogue rebuild, and he flew in from Los Angeles so he could attend the final services.“In 2015 and 2016, Houston came together to help us; in 2017 it was the entire American Jewish community,” said board member Amy Goldstein. “It was so impacting we could not deal with it ourselves.”Ultimately, the board decided repairing a building that repeatedly flooded would be a poor investment.Pix of devastation by flood of United Orthodox Synagogue of Houston. Please help! Donate at http://t.co/2ShBeY803q. pic.twitter.com/qzuxp08boL— Rabbi Steven Weil (@RabbiWeil) May 27, 2015The synagogue’s goal for demolition is March. Freedman Hall, an elevated reception hall next door, will continue to serve as the temporary sanctuary.Goldstein said the board of directors is exploring all viable options for a new building, such as rebuilding with elevated facilities or moving to a new location. A challenge is that since Orthodox Jews don’t drive on the Sabbath, congregation members must live within walking distance of the synagogue. After Harvey, several congregants spent a significant amount of their savings to fix their homes in order to stay in the neighborhood.“Going anywhere else would be a significant religious choice to make,” Goldstein said.On the final Sunday morning, old photos taken in the synagogue were spread across tables so worshippers could take a look into their building’s past. Rabbi Barry Gelman had many pictures of his family on Jewish holidays and occasions celebrated in the synagogue, which he said were moments he would never forget.“I have fond memories of sitting with my three generations of family,” Gelman said. “The walls in this room have absorbed the story of a lifetime.”United Orthodox broke ground on the complex in 1961 when the congregations Adath Emeth, Adath Israel and Beth Jacob merged. The building’s original plans were on display to honor the original days of the congregation. A photo of the synagogue when it was first built read, “Designed to Serve Forever.” Many members of the congregation said they believe that though their sanctuary soon will be gone, their memories will always remain.“I have absolute faith that the things that mean the most to us are going to continue,” said Dov Liberman, an official in the synagogue.After morning prayer, congregants reflected on a few of their favorite synagogue memories. They shared childhood stories of running behind the stained glass and emotional reflections of members who have died. When Holocaust survivor Alex Pollak reminisced about his second bar mitzvah last November, the crowd erupted in cheers.Two congregation members, Max Reichental and Steve Moore, are cousins who have been with the synagogue since its beginning. The two said the building has always been the hub of everything in their lives. Moore had his bar mitzvah at the synagogue in its second year, and he teared up when he thought back to his sister’s wedding there.“She looked so beautiful,” Moore said. “I will never forget that day.”The sanctuary is filled with sacred decorative features that have played an important part in the building’s history. The main stained glass window, memorial plaques dedicated to congregation members and other physical reminders of the synagogue’s past are being kept in hopes they will be moved to a new building.In a final gathering of closure, the congregation sat in its old seats to listen to speeches from United Orthodox President Rick Guttman and Gelman. The two thanked everyone who made the service possible and spoke about what the synagogue means to them.Once the last words were said and the services were over, congregants talked and laughed with one another over their personal history with the synagogue. Gloria Ribnick, a member for “forever and then some,” spoke of a brighter future in the congregation.“I think it’s not the end,” Ribnick said. “It’s the beginning.” Sharelast_img read more