Stars Strut Their Mutts For Best Friends Animal Society

first_imgCelebrities are going to the dogs for Best Friends Animal Society’s annual Strut Your Mutt Presented by BOBS from Skechers.Zosia Mamet, Denise Richards, Michelle Beadle, Natalie Morales and Kristen Renton will each lead their own fundraising packs in both the Los Angeles and New York City community dog walks and festivals.Strut Your Mutt is a 12 city fundraising dog walk, 5K run, and festival that brings together rescue groups, shelters and individuals to celebrate the collective effort of saving the lives of shelter pets. Additionally, through a virtual Strut Your Mutt Challenge, supporters can raise money to help homeless pets in their own communities or for national programs that help to create sweeping changes for homeless pets everywhere.Six events have already been held, but check below for the remaining opportunities.“When Best Friends started its work in 1984, there were approximately 17 million dogs and cats dying in shelters nationwide,” said Gregory Castle, chief executive officer of Best Friends Animal Society. “Thanks to the leadership of Best Friends, and the efforts of rescue groups and shelters across the country, today that number is down to an estimated 4 million. The donations raised during Strut Your Mutt are used to fund lifesaving adoption programs and spay/neuter services, so that, ultimately, we impact the number of pets entering and leaving the shelters. We won’t stop until we save them all.”Since 2010, Best Friends has raised more than $5.2 million for its animal welfare partners through Strut Your Mutt. The national goal for 2015 is $2.6 million.To get involved, start your own fundraising page or donate to an existing team, please visit StrutYourMutt.org.Special thanks to presenting sponsor BOBs by Skechers and national sponsors MINI and Nature’s Variety Instinct.The remaining dates are as follows:San Francisco – October 3 DC Metro Area – October 10 Los Angeles – October 10
St. Louis – October 10 Houston – October 17
Salt Lake City – October 24last_img read more

First Nations housing crisis will take a lifetime to solve says AFN

first_imgThe Canadian PressNew federal money for First Nations housing is welcome but will not solve a monumental shortage for at least a generation says Assembly of First Nations Regional Chief Kevin Hart.“I don’t see it happening in my lifetime or in my children’s lifetime, to be honest,” Hart said during a break in the AFN’s housing and infrastructure conference held in Winnipeg.“We have 16, 18 people in a two-bedroom house (in Norway House, Man.). Now if that was to occur here in Winnipeg with a non-native family, would that be acceptable? The black mould that’s in our houses _ would that be acceptable here in Winnipeg? Would that be acceptable in Toronto?”The federal government has promised $8.4 billion over five years for infrastructure, education and other issues in First Nations communities. The housing portion over the next two years is forecast to be more than double previous levels at $450 million.The money is a fraction of what reports have indicated is needed. Internal government documents dated January 2015 and obtained by The Canadian Press early this year pegged the cost of fixing First Nations housing in Manitoba alone at $2 billion.Indigenous Affairs Minister Carolyn Bennett said the government realizes it has a long way to go.“We know that we’ve only begun, and what we’re hearing from coast to coast to coast is people are very happy with the beginning … but no, there is real need out there and we’re going to get going,” she said.In a 20-minute speech at the conference, Bennett said the government is developing ways to ensure funding flows faster to communities in need, and is looking for ways to ensure better, longer-lasting building materials can be used.Hart said cash for housing is needed quickly. He pointed to several communities that have seen a spike in suicides in recent years. Pimicikamak Cree Nation, known as Cross Lake, in northern Manitoba declared a state of emergency last March after six suicides in the community of 8,300.Overcrowded housing, often combined with inadequate recreational facilities and schools, is tied to the despair felt by many residents, he said.“It all relates and it interconnects with proper housing and infrastructure in our communities.”news@aptn.calast_img read more

Autumn Peltier up for Nobel childrens prize

first_img“I like to speak for the water because the water doesn’t have a voice,” said Peltier. “If nobody speaks up what will the water and environment be like in 10 to 20 years? What if we don’t have clean drinking water anywhere? We would all die if we didn’t have clean drinking water.”Peltier said she hopes others will join in her struggle to protect water around the world.“The reason I advocate for this is to inspire people to come together and try and purify the water,” said Peltier.She still remembers that day last December when she got her moment to speak directly to Trudeau. In an interview shortly after it happened Peltier described the encounter.“When I went up there, I was standing with the Elder, listening to what he was saying and I was told to give the prime minister the water bundle,” Peltier said, at the time. “And I said something to him. I said, ‘I am very unhappy with the choices you’ve made.’ And he said, ‘I understand that.’ And I started crying and all I got to say after that was, ‘the pipelines.’”Looking back, Peltier, who is from Wikwemikong, on Manitoulin Island in Ontario, said she didn’t know what she was going to tell the prime minister at the time and the words just tumbled out.“When I went up to give him the gift I didn’t what I was going to do. I just had this feeling. I guess my spirit just wanted to say something while I was there and it was an opportunity to just say it,” said Peltier. “When I think about what I said I am just trying to help my people and help my environment and it makes me feel proud.”The KidsRights organization will announce the winner of the prize Nov. 10.jbarrera@aptn.ca@JorgeBarrera Autumn Peltier, flanked by AFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde and AFN Elder Elmer Courchene presents a water bundle to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in December 2016.Jorge Barrera APTN NewsAutumn Peltier, a 13-year-old Wikwemikong girl who tearfully pleaded with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to protect the water is up for an international award.Autumn Peltier’s name came to be known across the country after she presented Trudeau with a water bundle of a copper bowl, a red cloth, tobacco and a small copper cup during an Assembly of First Nations meeting in December 2016. During the gift presentation, Peltier told Trudeau she was “unhappy” with his decision to approve the Kinder Morgan pipeline in British Columbia.Now Peltier is up for the International Children’s Peace Prize, known as the Nobel Prize for children. She is the only child out of 169 nominees from Canada.“When I found out that I was nominated for the award I was really excited and I am really excited to find out if I win or not,” said Peltier. “If I don’t win I am still really happy to be doing the work I am doing.”Peltier has dedicated herself to campaigning for water protection. This past July she was in Regina during the AFN’s general assembly to sign a treaty against the expansion of Alberta’s bitumen fields.last_img read more