Stoke City v Chelsea: Courtois returns

first_imgFit-again goalkeeper Thibaut Courtois returns for Chelsea at Stoke this evening.Didier Drogba and Kurt Zouma, who suffered injuries at Derby last week, have both been passed fit and are on the bench for the Premier League leaders, as is Oscar.John Mikel Obi keeps his place in midfield, with Cesc Fabregas continuing in a more advanced role.For Stoke, Bojan has recovered from a hip problem and Marc Muniesa returns from injury. Stoke: Begovic; Bardsley, Shawcross, Muniesa, Pieters; Cameron, Nzonzi; Walters, Bojan, Arnautovic; CrouchSubs: Butland, Huth, Whelan, Wilson, Adam, Diouf, Assaidi. Chelsea: Courtois; Ivanovic, Cahill, Terry, Azpilicueta; Mikel, Matic; Willian, Fabregas, Hazard; Costa.Subs: Cech, Filipe Luis, Zouma, Ake, Oscar, Schurrle, Drogba.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Avalon Theatre rises from the ashes

first_img2 September 2010Seventy-one years of independent South African cinema is to be celebrated in October 2010 when the Moosa family’s Avalon Group, once almost destroyed by apartheid, opens a new luxury Cine Centre in the upmarket Killarney Mall in Johannesburg.South Africa has a rich history of cinema stretching back almost 100 years, and early projection devices were shown on the Johannesburg goldfields as early as 1896. The first cinema newsreels ever released were filmed at the front during the Anglo-Boer War of 1899 to 1902, and the country’s first narrative film was The Kimberley Diamond Robbery, made in 1910 by Springbok Films.In Durban during the 1920s a young man named Aboobaker – or “AB” – Moosa fell in love with the cinema, and longed to have a theatre of his own where he could watch the movies he wanted for free. In 1939, at age 37, his dream was realised when he and Abdulla Kajee co-founded the Avalon Theatre in Durban’s Victoria Street.World’s longest partnership with 20th Century FoxThe theatre was a huge success, catering largely for the South African Indian community. Moosa built on this success by becoming one of the first to bring early Bollywood movies to South Africa, and by establishing a distribution agreement with 20th Century Fox. Now in its 71st year, this is the world’s longest uninterrupted partnership with the Hollywood giant.The business boomed, and AB began opening theatres elsewhere in South Africa – in Johannesburg, Cape Town, Kimberley, Durban, East London, Port Elizabeth and Paarl.“My father had an uncanny eye for property,” Moosa Moosa, AB’s third son, told Property Magazine. “When he spotted a new site for a cinema, he always snapped it up.” Moosa took over the business after his father’s death in the 1960s, and bought it up outright from his brothers in the 1980s.In its heyday the Avalon Group operated 18 cinemas across the country, making up over 10% of the market share at the time.Apartheid and the Group Areas ActBut AB soon fell foul of apartheid legislation and its Group Areas Act.“When the Nats [National Party government] began their expropriation process, we felt completely violated,” Moosa told Property Magazine. “The notice was delivered by a condescending official who was determined to let you know who was boss.“You were given 90 days notice to attempt to sell the property at its market value – of course this was impossible. The potential purchaser wouldn’t offer a fair price, because he knew you were cornered. He’d offer something ridiculous, and if you declined, the government would offer only 80% of that.”In 1964, at the age of 21, Moosa witnessed his father’s humiliation at their family’s eviction from their grand colonial home on the corner of Goble and Windmere Roads in Durban under the Group Areas Act. As Indians, they were no longer allowed to live in what had been declared a whites-only area.AB Moosa did not survive either the eviction or what Moosa refers to as the “legislated theft” of his assets. The Group Areas Act and Reservation of Separate Amenities Act began to destroy AB’s empire.In this darkest time, Moosa Moosa took on sole ownership of Avalon and ran only one cinema in Durban. “We might not even have retained that, but the Grey Street complex was in a so-called ‘Indian’ area,” Moosa says. “In effect, it was frozen terrain – the government hadn’t quite made up its mind about it.”A new dawn; and AB JuniorIn the 1990s apartheid came to an end, and the Avalon Group’s fortunes began to revive. Around that time Moosa was joined in the business by his only son, AB Junior, who was named after his grandfather. AB Junior had just left school and decided to work alongside his father for, in his own words, a “love of the cinema and of the entertainment business as a whole”.“When I joined we were down to one cinema screen,” he says. “However, my father and myself took it upon ourselves to transform the South African cinema landscape”.His passion was not only to rebuild Avalon, but also to restore the family’s rightful place in the industry and put right the historical wrongs of the past.“The challenge was formidable,” AB Junior says. “We brought an action against the dominant cinema group, and we won. We paved the way for the resurgence of the Avalon name.”Lifetime achievement, entrepreneurship awardsWith over 50 years in the industry, Moosa Moosa is the longest serving cinema executive in South Africa and among the longest serving in the world.In 1997 he appeared before the Truth and Reconciliation Commission business hearings to give evidence on the abuses inflicted by the apartheid system on African, coloured and Indian businesses, and in 1998 was invited to appear before the portfolio committee in parliament to make representations in relation to the new Competition Bill.In 2007 Moosa was given a South African Film and Television Industry lifetime achievement award. The Avalon Group is now the oldest and third-largest cinema operating company in South Africa, after Ster-Kinekor and Nu Metro, and the leader in distributing increasingly popular Bollywood movies.AB Junior continues in the footsteps of his distinguished family, and is now managing director of the Avalon Group. “When your business is also a passion you are doing what you really want to do, so the flow is reasonably easy,” he says.AB Junior founded the movie production arm of the business, Avalon Productions, and was a line producer on the Bollywood blockbuster Dhoom 2, which was partly filmed in South Africa. The movie has gone on to become the highest-grossing Bollywood production of all time, earning more that US$40-million (R300-million). In 2007, the year his father was given a lifetime achievement award by the industry, AB Junior was named South African Entrepreneur of the Year.Avalon’s most ambitious project yetAnd now, in 2010, Avalon’s most ambitious project to date comes to fruition at the Killarney Mall shopping centre in Johannesburg’s affluent northern suburbs. Opening in October, the new Cine Centre will be a specialised luxury cinema complex featuring the latest Hollywood and Bollywood blockbusters. The centre will have five screens, each featuring the latest 3D and digital projection hardware, as well as state-of-the-art Dolby Digital surround sound.Interestingly, the suburb of Killarney was the centre of the Johannesburg film industry in the early 1900s, and the land now occupied by the Killarney Mall was once the site of film studios and a film laboratory.“All five cinemas will offer cutting-edge viewing technology including 3D,” says Debra Sharnock, centre manager of Killarney Mall. “A fully digital 3D cinema complex is a first for the South African cinema industry, demonstrating the extraordinary quality that movie-goers can expect at Johannesburg’s newest cinema development.”A highlight of the Cine Centre will be a luxurious 64-seat gold-class theatre available for hire.“Killarney Mall is the ideal venue for our new Cine Centre, with its long-standing reputation as one of the city’s leading centres,” says AB Junior. “The Avalon Group is confident that our new venture at Killarney Mall will further enhance our stature as leaders in our industry.”Source: Gauteng Film Commissionlast_img read more

Play Your Part episode 11: synopsis

first_imgHere’s your sneak peek of episode 12 of the Play Your Part television series:Catharien Saayman is the principal of the Abraham Kriel Child & Youth Care Centre in Potchefstroom in North West. She is one of the guests featured on Play Your Part episode 12. (Images: Brand South Africa)Brand South Africa reporterCatharien Saayman is the head of the Abraham Kriel Child & Youth Care Centre in Potchefstroom. She oversees the facility, which cares for 230 children from North West.The children are referred to the centre by the children’s court. There are nine houses with adult caregivers who live with the youngsters.Saayman is one of the guests on Play Your Part episode 12, to be broadcast on Saturday, 2 December 2017 on SABC2 at 18:00.Here’s more on the other two guests featured on this week’s episode:Thato MokhothuThato MokhothuMokhothu is the founder of the company RTT Construction in Bloemfontein. She is also the founder of the initiative, Phenomenal Women. The NPO focuses on female and youth empowerment, and does things such as host finance workshops for the target group.Silindile MakhathiniSilindile MakhathiniZinakenjalo Hygiene founder and director Makhathini has a passion for education and the empowerment of women. Her company, Zinakenjalo – a Nguni name – is a 100% black female-owned manufacturing and hygiene company. It produces Authenticare sanitary pads.Play Your Part is broadcast at 18:00 on Saturdays on SABC 2.To get involved in playing your part in South Africa:Check out the conversation on Twitter: #GetInvolved; orFind out about initiatives on Play Your Part here.Tell us how you Play Your Part through our social media channels:Follow us on Twitter: @PlayYourPartSA;Follow Brand South Africa on Twitter: @Brand_SA;Like us on Facebook: Official Brand South Africa.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

a month agoTraore thinks Wolves have advantage over Braga

first_imgTraore thinks Wolves have advantage over Bragaby Ansser Sadiqa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveWolves winger Adama Traore says the club have the edge over Braga ahead of their Europa League clash on Thursday.The Premier League club have a massive Portuguese contingent, including coach Nuno Espirito Santo.And Traore thinks the knowledge of Portuguese football will work in Wolves’ favour.He said: “The coach comes from Portuguese football and so do many of our players.”We know about Portuguese football, we know the Portuguese culture.”They know the players and the league, and they have played teams like Braga many times before.”We will accept any help we can as we attempt to keep moving forward to become a better team.”It has to help that we know so much about them and they don’t know so much about us.”It’s the same for me if I play a Spanish team – I come from there and I know their mentality.”That has to help if you know the mentality of your opponent, and how he wants to play.” About the authorAnsser SadiqShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Photo: Jim Harbaugh Recruiting Graduate Students For “Top Secret” Research Projects

first_imgjim harbaugh research flyerTwitter/@ByAZunigaIf we’ve learned anything about Jim Harbaugh in his first 18 months as Michigan head coach, it is that he’ll look for any advantage he can get. Based on a flyer posted to Twitter by Maize ‘N Brew‘s Alejandro Zúñiga, Harbaugh is recruiting “highly motivated” Michigan graduate students for top secret “applied research projects.”Michigan football is planning a top-secret project: pic.twitter.com/rBW5CCdoa9— Alejandro Zúñiga (@ByAZuniga) June 15, 2016It is impossible not to be intrigued by what the means, coming from Jim Harbaugh’s Michigan program. It could be anything.MORE FROM COLLEGE SPUN:The 10 Most Aggressive Fan Bases In CFBIn Photos: Golfer Paige SpiranacESPN Makes Decision On Dick Vitalelast_img read more

NEPA to Undertake Study in Negril Great Morass

first_img These activities fall under the Integrating Water, Land and Ecosystems Management in Caribbean Small Island Developing States project, which seeks to implement institutional arrangements to ensure the long-term sustainability of wetland biological resources. The funds will also be used to establish a Project Management Unit, and to engage the services of a hydrologist, who will prepare a Hydrological Assessment. Story Highlights In the upcoming fiscal year, the National Environment and Planning Agency (NEPA) will be undertaking a knowledge, attitudes and practices study with farmers and users of protected wetlands in the Negril Great Morass. In the upcoming fiscal year, the National Environment and Planning Agency (NEPA) will be undertaking a knowledge, attitudes and practices study with farmers and users of protected wetlands in the Negril Great Morass.With a sum of $40 million, which has been provided in the 2018/19 Estimates of Expenditure, the agency will be engaging the services of a communications specialist to conduct the study.The funds will also be used to establish a Project Management Unit, and to engage the services of a hydrologist, who will prepare a Hydrological Assessment.These activities fall under the Integrating Water, Land and Ecosystems Management in Caribbean Small Island Developing States project, which seeks to implement institutional arrangements to ensure the long-term sustainability of wetland biological resources.It also aims to restore historical hydrological and other physical processes in the Negril Great Morass, enhance and re-establish native vegetation communities to provide habitat to wetland fauna, and eliminate conflicts that degrade ecosystem functions.So far under the project, Global Environment Facility (GEF) Board approval was received in April 2015, and NEPA commenced project-initiation consultations with Negril stakeholders.The project, which is slated to end in November 2020, is being funded by the GEF.last_img read more

Sixyearold girl lured from playground sexually assaulted Vancouver police

first_imgVancouver police say a man lured a six-year-old girl from an elementary school playground and sexually assaulted her.Police say it happened on Dec. 5 when the girl was at the playground outside Sexsmith Elementary School in south Vancouver.Police say the man took her to a nearby location where he assaulted her before walking her back to the school.The suspect is described as a darker-skinned man, about 30 years old, with brown or grey hair and wearing grey pants.The department’s sex crimes unit is looking for dash-cam footage from anyone who may have been driving in the area between 8:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m.Const. Jason Doucette says in a release the department’s top priority is public safety, especially a child’s well-being.“Our detectives have now had an opportunity to speak with the victim and follow up on leads and are using the information to ask for the public’s help. We want to hear from anyone who could have seen something or may have dash-cam footage,” he says.  The Canadian Presslast_img read more

AFNs Bellegarde demanding immediate meeting with Valcourt

first_imgAPTN National News OTTAWA—Assembly of First Nations National Chief Perry Bellegarde is demanding an “immediate meeting” with Aboriginal Affairs Minister Bernard Valcourt in the wake of a deadly fire on a Saskatchewan First Nation that left two children dead.Bellegarde sent a letter to Valcourt via fax on Friday saying he wanted to discuss lifting the two per cent cap placed on yearly funding for First Nations. Bellegarde said the cap has left many First Nation communities struggling with limited resources which creates situations like the tragic one last Tuesday on the Makwa Sahgaiehcan First Nation.“The situation is at a crisis level and the reasons all point to the fact the government of Canada provides insufficient funds to First Nations to adequately provide their members a safe and healthy environment,” said Bellegarde. “The time is now to work together to address the challenges facing First Nations in terms of fire prevention and protection. Directly related to this is an open and honest discussion on lifting the 2 per cent cap on First Nations funding.”Valcourt blamed Makwa Sahgaiehcan First Nation for not having the ability to fight the fire Tuesday that killed the two children. Facing questions from the NDP during question period Thursday, Valcourt said his department was giving First Nations adequate resources to deal with things like fire prevention and firefighting.“This particular band has received consistent funding for fire protection services,” said Valcourt. “And the fact of the matter is that each band council is responsible for fire protection on the reserve…That First Nation, like others, received sufficient funds to deal with fire safety.”Bellegarde said in his letter there was no point in blaming First Nations.“It is not the time to play politics or blame First Nations that are trying to do what they can with inadequate resources,” said Bellegarde. “That will not change the outcome of these tragic events.”The Chretien Liberals imposed the two per cent cap in the mid-1990s. Under the cap, overall funding for First Nations can’t grow more than two per cent a yearIn the letter, Bellegarde quotes former Aboriginal affairs deputy minister Scott Searson who told a Senate committee the cap was only supposed to be temporary. Bellegarde also mentioned an Aboriginal Affairs presentation that with tabled before the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal. Bellegarde said the departmental presentation shows the government is aware of the impact the two per cent cap has had on First Nations.“I am asking for an immediate meeting with you to advance this work. Time is of the essence,” said Bellegarde, in the letter. “The longer we live and operate under these restrictive policies the more we are jeopardizing the health and safety of First Nations citizens.”The Loon Lake volunteer fire department did not respond to the fire in Makwa Sahgaiehcan because the band was three months behind on its fire bill.Local RCMP officers were the first responders on the scene and they saw the biological father bring his two-year-old boy and 18-month-old daughter out of the burning home.Valcourt’s office says the department gave Makwa Sahgaiehcan $34,000 for fire prevention and services in the 2014-2015 fiscal year.news@aptn.ca@APTNnewslast_img read more

Crazy Rich Asians draws immigrant parents to the movies

first_imgWhen “Crazy Rich Asians” surpassed expectations and grabbed the top spot at the box office in its opening weekend, the film also pulled off another surprising feat: It put Asians of a certain age in theatre seats.Younger Asian-Americans have been flocking with their parents to see the first movie in 25 years with an all-Asian cast.For many older, first-generation Asian immigrants, going to the movies doesn’t rank high among hobbies and interests. The crowds, the language barrier and ticket prices are often turnoffs.But the appeal of “Crazy Rich Asians,” the story of a culture clash that erupts when an Asian-American woman from New York meets her boyfriend’s family in Singapore, has bridged a real-life generation gap.Earning more than $40 million since its Aug. 15 release, the film already has a sequel in development.An adaptation of Kevin Kwan’s bestselling novel, the rom-com is poised to hit the $100 million mark due to its popularity and a lack of strong competition in the next month, comScore senior media analyst Paul Dergarabedian said.“The over-performance of ‘Crazy Rich Asians’ shows the power of a great movie with universal themes to draw all audiences and also to break down preconceived notions of what can constitute a box office hit,” Dergarabedian said.Broken down by ethnicity, Asians made up nearly 40 per cent of the film’s audience during its opening weekend, Warner Bros said. By comparison, Asian/Pacific Islanders comprised just 10 per cent of the audience in the opening days of last year’s “Spider-Man: Homecoming,” according to an analysis done by comScore/Screen Engine’s PostTrak.The jump can be partly credited to enthusiastic Asian-Americans who wanted their parents to be part of what the film’s star, Constance Wu, has called a “movement.”Lie Shia Ong-Sintzel, 36, of Seattle talked her parents into coming along the second time she saw the movie. It was the first time in five years the couple — Chinese immigrants from Indonesia — had been to the cinema.“They don’t really go to movies in the theatre. I usually have to drag them,” Ong-Sintzel said. “I felt like this was a big occasion — a movie with an all-Asian cast.”Looking at her parents, she cried because everything from the acting to the food seemed to resonate more. She wasn’t the only one.“I looked over again, my dad was wiping tears from his eyes,” Ong-Sintzel said.In Temple City, California, Catherine Fanchiang, 27, who is Taiwanese-American, went to see the film a third time to keep her parents company.Fanchiang’s mother, Kao Han Fan, also wanted to see the movie because she recognized Michelle Yeoh, who plays a wary matriarch. But it was Wu’s character who touched the 64-year-old the most. Fan said she liked how the story depicted an “ABC,” (American-born Chinese) who showed Asian cultural values such as putting family first.“When you grow up in an Asian family … it will be in your mind when you do something, you will always think about other people,” Fan said. “You are not really, really selfish, thinking about yourself.”Fanchiang enjoyed watching her parents see an American film with Asians that wasn’t a period piece.“It was just a regular movie that just happens to have Asian people in it. It’s not like we’re ninjas or we’re good at fighting. It’s Asians existing in the modern world,” Fanchiang said.The stars and director Jon M. Chu have said they wanted the film to showcase Asians who weren’t stereotypes or little-used side-players.In the case of Alice Sue and her daughter, Audrey Sue-Matsumoto, the 67-year-old mother saw the movie first. She went a second time Thursday in the San Francisco Bay Area suburb of Daly City with her daughter. Sue, who is Chinese, doesn’t go to the movies much but knew she had to see this one.“It’s talking about Asian culture. It’s real Asians mixed with American-born Asians,” Sue said. “And I want to support the Asian movies.”Sue-Matsumoto, 35, said there probably wasn’t a more fitting film for the two to see together.“It was good to watch it with my mom because I feel like it was very relatable in our situation,” Sue-Matsumoto said. “She’s an immigrant, and I’m American-born. That movie has that generational distinction.”For Mark Gadia, 36, of Chula Vista, California, the movie led to him learning more about his parents’ courtship in the Philippines. His parents related to Wu and Henry Golding’s star-crossed couple because of how his mother was treated by her future in-laws.“She apparently wasn’t good enough for my dad. It took this movie to make this revelation of how they met,” Gadia said.He did not expect to come away having enjoyed seeing the film alongside his parents as much as he did.“As sappy as this sounds, it’s something I’ll always remember,” Gadia said. “It’s kind of sad it took 25 years, but I’m glad I had the opportunity to have this experience as an adult.”___Follow Terry Tang on Twitter at https://twitter.com/ttangAPlast_img read more

FSJ Loves Family week starts today with event at Home Hardware

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Over thirty family-friendly events will be happening around the Energetic City starting Saturday, as the Family Friendly Coalition hosts FSJ Loves Families Week.The coalition, which is comprised of Success by 6, the Children First Initiative, and others are organizing the event, which goes from October 6th to 13th. The week will kick-off today in coordination with the Fort St. John Fire Department’s fire safety week.The Fort St. John Fire Department will host their event Saturday at Home Hardware that will include a smokehouse, bouncy slide, BBQ and fire trucks. For the rest of FSJ Loves Families week, all of the events are either completely free or incredibly low priced. A full list of events can be found here:last_img read more