Luxury hotel ditching key cards after hackers strike

first_img Tuesday, January 31, 2017 Tags: Austria, Technology Share << Previous PostNext Post >> PARIS — An Austrian luxury hotel says it’s ditching electronic room cards for old-fashioned locks and keys after having their systems frozen by blackmail-hungry hackers.The husband-and-wife management of Romantik Seehotel Jaegerwirt, in the Austrian Alps, says that one recent infection with ransom software resulted in the complete shutdown of hotel computers.They say they were forced to pay roughly 1,500 euros (nearly $1,600) worth of electronic currency to restore their network.Several publications incorrectly reported that the ransomware infection resulted in guests being locked into or out of their rooms.In a series of emails, the hotel said Tuesday that the infection only resulted in new guests being temporarily unable to get keys to their rooms.Hotel co-manager Christina Brandstaetter says the new arrivals were treated to champagne while they waited. Luxury hotel ditching key cards after hackers strike Source: The Associated Presslast_img read more

When I say 3431 Rams over Seahawks in overtime w

first_imgWhen I say 34-31 Rams over Seahawks in overtime, what do you think about? What comes to your mind about that game?That the Rams probably have a quarterback that can at least do some things and really propel that offense because we always knew what they could do defensively, but they just needed a few different pieces of the puzzle on offense to really challenge and it sounds and looks like they finally have their guy. There is no question when you look at the division from top to bottom with the Seahawks and the Rams, and you never want to count out San Francisco, we’ll certainly have our hands full. Sometimes, it’s best to go straight to the man in charge.And when it comes to the Arizona Cardinals’ roster, that man is Steve Keim.Arizona’s general manager since January 2013, Keim has overseen a transformation that led to 21 wins over two seasons. His deft touch with the draft and free agency has led to the team becoming a contender in the NFC.Lucky for us, Keim happens to be a weekly guest on the Doug and Wolf Show, right here on Arizona Sports 98.7 FM. And since what he has to say is important, we thought it would be a good idea to put his words into print, allowing you to read what the GM is thinking. So, without further ado, here’s this week’s edition, which follows Arizona’s season-opening 31-19 win over the New Orleans Saints: Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impact Comments   Share   – / 21 Your browser does not support the audio element. LISTEN: Steve Keim, Cardinals general manager Arizona Cardinals general manager Steve Keim watches the offense and defense during an NFL football training camp practice Monday, Aug. 3, 2015, in Glendale, Ariz. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin) When healthy, Dave Zastudil did a lot of good things for this team, you made the decision that this is the time for Drew Butler. I know punting is kind of a boring subject but that was a huge punt to pin Drew Brees up against his own end zone.No doubt. I think Drew (Butler) would tell you he’d like to have one of those punts back. I know he had one earlier in the game that wasn’t so great but I think he responded really well and that punt to pin him at – I think it was the two yard line – you couldn’t have asked for a better placement.If you had to give out a game ball, just one, is there a guy that you would give it to? Do you know who that would be?It would be a really hard decision between Jonathan Cooper and Earl Watford. Earl because he stepped up and answered the bell and again when you watch the game on tape Wolf, you’d be really proud of the way Earl played. But Jonathan Cooper a guy who is, talk about bouncing back from adversity – being a first round pick, people getting down on him being frustrated with the fact that he’s not back and healthy – and then to be able to start his real, really his first NFL football game, and to play at the level he played. To be able to pull and play in space, some of the stuff he did in combination climbing to the second level. Really a couple times, on the one touchdown in the first quarter to John Brown, he peeled back and gave Carson the opportunity to make that throw. I couldn’t be more proud of Coop because he’s been through a lot. The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelo Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires Steve, you had mentioned that you were a little troubled by some of the screen game, but overall evaluate the performance in the first regular season game by your defensive coordinator.Very good. Bettch has great understanding of what he’s trying to do. He’s aggressive, he’s not scared to dial up the blitz. I think he likes some of the personnel packages that he has on defense. Listen, it’s no secret that Sean Payton is an excellent play caller and Drew Brees does an excellent job of running that offense with a great deal of tempo and understanding and smarts. I think for a rookie defensive coordinator he did an excellent job. I think as a whole our defensive line stood out as a group. They played really really good. Rodney Gunter got his first start, played very good. Frostee [Rucker], Calais [Campbell] those guys were really active up front and can’t say enough about Alex Okafor with two sacks.Could a team have a better characteristic than being able to win close games in the fourth quarter?When you have a locker room full of guys who are committed to one thing and one goal in mind, when you face adversity – which again, every game you’re going to have some kind of adversity – the guys who have the real character, the intangibles in the locker room, those are the type of teams that bounce back and answer the bell. It’s when you have those guys in the locker room that aren’t great intangible players and aren’t great character guys that things can go south quickly. On the David Johnson touchdown, were you surprised that BA did not run the ball?No, not at all. What’s he say? It’s no risk it, no biscuit. But I will say this, when David caught the ball you just questioned what he was going to do with it after he caught it, and I think everybody realizes now that at 226 lbs., he did run low 4.4s coming out of Northern Iowa at the combine, which is why we were so excited about him.Steve, what’s the latest on Andre Ellington? What do you know?He’ll have an MRI this morning. At some point I’ll talk with Tom Reed and our medical staff. It’s interesting. Last night after the game he told me he felt pretty good, so we’re optimistic. But again we’ll wait until the MRI this morning and see if it reveals any additional injury information. That’s why you always have to protect yourself in this game which is exactly why we signed Chris Johnson, exactly why we signed David Johnson, and really feel good about both of those guys moving forward.What about Michael Floyd?I think it was a combination of coach probably didn’t want to overdo it yet at the same time get him a taste of real live football. Again, he missed the majority of training camp with that injury and it’s a testament to him that he was even out there on the field.  I think that each game, each practice, each day, he’ll get additional snaps. I think some of it really had to do with the game plan and some of the packages we ran on offense. Top Stories Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and selling What pleased you the most overall after watching the film?Probably the way that Earl Watford played.  Earl maybe gave up a few pass rushes to Cameron Jordan who’s a good player, but for the most part I would’ve said Earl played a very very good game. Really strong at the point of attack, created some movement in the run game. I thought that Jonathan Cooper and Jared Veldheer played excellent – not good – excellent, I mean those guys were really, really good. Coop got out in space a couple times on some pulls and had some nice blocks for Chris and Andre to pick up big yardage. It was nice to late in the game be able to run the football with some effectiveness.Carson Palmer is 14-2 in his last 16 games as the Cardinals starter. Why?Because he’s a really good player that has a great understanding of this offense and more than anything, when you give Carson Palmer time and protect him, he can spin the rock as good as any of them in terms of ball placement, touch, accuracy. At home, our fan base does such a great job creating a home atmosphere and a tough place to play for other teams that it’s just a great combination. We have a head coach that’s not scared to go for the jugular, we have great fans and we have a competitive team who plays at a high level at home. Are there any General Manager traditions? Like when you get a hole-in-one you’ve gotta buy drinks, stuff like that. When a rookie scores a touchdown in his very first game, do you have to send a bottle of wine to Northern Iowa? Do other GMs send you something? What’s the tradition on that?(laughs)No, just excited to get the win.  It’s funny, I asked David on Wednesday in practice if he was scared. And if he was scared I told him I’d get him a dog, but I talked to him in the locker room again last night and I think we all realize now he’s not scared. It was good to see him have some success.Overall I just finished up with the tape and just like I had talked about in the previous couple shows we had, really excited about some of the offensive playmakers, the explosiveness that we had on offense. I know there were some concerns with our offensive line in the preseason, I thought we would get that smoothed out, and I thought those guys actually as a whole played excellent up front after watching the tape this morning.Yet at the same time there were some concerns. You know the Saints had two explosive plays off of two mental mistakes we had with our outside linebackers where we didn’t peel in the passing game and come off and cover the backs. There were obviously some substitution issues which created a seven-point swing on the punt return deal that set-up a touchdown return for them which is really unacceptable. And then we were out-leveraged a few times on some screens, but for the most part our guys played hard, they played fast, they played aggressive and it was nice to come away with the win.last_img read more

October 13 2005 Colly Soleri Music Center w

first_imgOctober 13, 2005 Colly Soleri Music Center welcomes back HUMAN NATURE Dance Theater. This is the 11th year that this group from Flagstaff, AZ comes for a 7-day workshop. Morning, afternoon and evening practice and performances accumulate in a public performance on Saturday evening, October 15. 2005. The performance this year, TOUCH AND GO takes a humorous yet sensitive look at how we relate to each other. How do we touch each other? What is taboo? What connects us? It addresses intimacy, attraction, sexuality, aggression, tenderness andloss. The show is challenging, bold and full of questions. Dinner will be served at 6:00 pm and the performance starts at 7:30 pm. Arcosanti Chef Eleanor Gillis Menu for this event is: Roasted Eggplant Coconut Soup, Mixed Green Salad with Sweet Pecans, Blue Cheese, Pears and Arcosanti Peach Vinaigrette Dressing, Crispy Polenta Rounds, Green Beans with Mustard-Dill Sauce, Butternut Squash with Creamy Leeks, Pork stewed with Fruit and Port and Bread Pudding with Lemon Sauce. For more information on please click Human Nature Performance. [Photo & Text: sa]last_img read more

Digital TV penetration in Russia will reach 98 by

first_imgDigital TV penetration in Russia will reach 98% by 2020, up from just under 50% at the end of 2013, according to figures from Digital TV Research. The stats predict that nearly a third of homes in the country will be primary DTT households by 2020, up from just 7.5% at the end of 2013, with every platform having “ambitious plans to roll out digital services.”Digital TV Research claims that digital pay TV penetration will climb from 36.0% in 2013 to 60.7% by 2020.“Massive network construction (using the latest technology) is underway, which will irrevocably change the market. However, satellite TV is the boom market at present, with consumers attracted by low cost packages,” said the report.Analogue terrestrial switch-off is expected to take place in Russia in 2018, though Digital TV Research says it expects analogue cable switch-off to take longer. It predicts that analogue cable TV penetration will fall from 37% in 2010 to 2% by 2020.“Analogue cable subscribers include many homes which take the low-cost ‘social package’, which usually comprises retransmissions of the terrestrial channels. Although many of these homes will convert to DTT – or even pay digital platforms – some will hang on to the analog cable subscription for as long as possible,” said Digital TV Research.It claims that pay TV revenues in Russia will increase by US$1.14 billion between 2010 and 2020 to reach US$2.02 billion. “ARPUs for cable TV have traditionally been low and this trend is continuing with the popularity of cheap DTH packages. However, DTH ARPUs are expected to increase, with cable and IPTV slowly falling.”last_img read more

The US federal government may be ladling on more r

first_imgThe US federal government may be ladling on more regulations to Bitcoin and making disparaging comments about the cyber-currency, but it’s one of the largest holders of the virtual money in the world. The federal government has trashed Bitcoin by way of an investor alert from the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) entitled “Bitcoin: More than a Bit Risky.” FINRA said it issued the alert to caution investors that buying and using digital currency, such as Bitcoin, carries risks. Speculative trading in bitcoins carries significant risk. There is also the risk of fraud related to companies claiming to offer Bitcoin payment platforms and other Bitcoin-related products and services. The financial watchdog warned investors that Bitcoin wasn’t legal tender and therefore, “If no one accepts bitcoins, bitcoins will become worthless.” Trading platforms can be hacked, and transactions can involve fraud or theft. Digital wallets don’t guarantee safety like FDIC-insured banks. Property actually transfers in a Bitcoin transaction, so refunds are at the discretion of the seller. Bitcoin has been used in illegal activity because of the anonymity it offers. And finally, speculation in the cyber-currency makes the price volatile. Uncle Sam: Second Largest Bitcoin Holder With all that, the government must figure Bitcoin is worthless, right? Well, no. Readers may remember an online marketplace called Silk Road that was seized by the US Marshals Service (USMS). Bitcoin was the coin of the Silk Road realm, and the US government went ahead and auctioned roughly $20 million of the cyber-currency seized from the online marketplace, despite the Silk Road entrepreneurs not yet having had their day in court. Forty-five bidders registered to buy 29,656 bitcoins. Each ponied up a $200,000 deposit. Reportedly, 63 bids were received by the USMS, with the currency transferred to the winner after the 12-hour auction. What’s curious is that a single anonymous bidder won the auction, beating out prominent investment firms, including Pantera Capital and SecondMarket. There was even speculation that the auction was a ruse and the government didn’t sell at all. Either way, the government still holds 110,000 bitcoins, worth $55 million at today’s $500 per coin price, down considerably from $641 when the auction was held at the end of June. However, given that there are only 13 million or so bitcoins outstanding, the US government is the second largest single holder of this unregulated, potentially “worthless” digital currency (in FINRA’s words), that is used, again according to FINRA, in criminal activity. Government Ignores the Warnings Federal marshals evidently aren’t listening to Mark T. Williams, former Federal Reserve bank examiner and Boston University finance instructor, who wrote last December for Business Insider, “I predict that Bitcoin will trade for under $10 a share by the first half of 2014.” The ex-bank examiner called Bitcoin a “wannabe currency” with a “flawed DNA” that is “steep in Libertarian and anti-Fed dogma but weak in understanding of how global economics, central banking policies, and financial markets function.” Yes, Bitcoin was created by Satoshi Nakamoto (whoever that may be) in response to how badly governments have handled monetary policies. The PHDs running the world’s central banks are creating booms and busts and misery for millions, while destroying the value of their currencies in mere decades. Yet, Professor Williams has the brass to write, “To assume currency can be computer generated, run in a decentralized manner and outside of the central banking system and controls is farcical and economically dangerous.” The Return of Money to the Marketplace Bitcoin is merely the return of money to where it came from—the entrepreneurial marketplace. Money wasn’t a creation of government policy; it is an idea that was stolen by government in order to tax people covertly through inflation. What started with kings shaving and clipping coins, has become cruelly efficient, with central bank economists conjuring up money with computer keystrokes. The bother of paper and ink are no longer required. People use Bitcoin because they want to; they use dollars because they have to. Government hates competition, so it prosecutes counterfeiters aggressively and takes a dim view of cyber money competitors. Williams takes a swipe at the Winklevoss twins who have predicted Bitcoin will reach $40,000 per coin and who have a Bitcoin exchange traded fund (ETF) in the SEC’s approval process. Nasdaq Vice President of Transaction Services and head of ETF business, David LaValle, says about the proposed Bitcoin ETF: I think it’s significant that we’re on the precipice of a new investable asset that’s coming to market or becoming available to investors first in the form of an ETF. In some ways, it gives the ETF credibility, and it accentuates many of the benefits of the ETF as an investment wrapper. To that extent, it’s important for the ETF industry. He went on to say, “I think bringing it in an ETF wrapper gives bitcoins more credibility.” Once upon a time, buying gold meant breaking the law. From 1933 to 1974, US citizens could only own up to $100 worth of gold. After 1974, buying gold meant searching for coins in out-of-the-way pawn shops and coin shops. Then in November 2004, the gold ETF (GLD) began trading on the New York Stock Exchange. The yellow metal was lifted from the investment shadows and rose in price from the mid-$400 range to $1,900 before falling back to where it is today. Bitcoin Is Gold 2.0 Approval of the Winklevoss ETF will do the same for Bitcoin, which Chriss Street of the American Thinker calls “Gold 2.0.” Street points out that only 5.6 million troy ounces of gold have been mined, and Satoshi’s protocol allows only 21 million bitcoins to be mined. Street explains: … by 2040 when the world population reaches 10 billion, there will only be 1 bitcoin for every 500 people on the earth. Gold and bitcoins are similar in lacking intrinsic value unless members of society have confidence they will maintain their value over time.… The value of bitcoins and gold are rooted in their rarity, ease of handling, and inability of government to destroy its store of wealth…. Welcome to the true full-faith of Gold 2.0. Recently, online travel agent Expedia began accepting Bitcoin, joining Dell, Overstock, TigerDirect, and other retailers. Flat 128, a retailer that sells British jewelry and accessories in New York’s West Village, just installed a Bitcoin ATM, where patrons can exchange cash for the electronic currency. Flat 128’s owner says 15 to 20 people a day come into her store to use the ATM. “Merchants around the country say that the Bitcoin A.T.M.s are helping draw would-be customers, too,” writes Sydney Ember for the New York Times. “Some of those are in coffee shops, where the tech crowd and early Bitcoin adopters are coming in for beverages.” This movement toward the cyber-currency flies in the face of what ex-bank examiner Williams wrote at the end of last year, “This is why in recent weeks, as large price movements have occurred, we have seen more credible retailers saying ‘No’ to Bitcoin.” The government knows Bitcoin (or something like it) isn’t going away. The government just wants to tax it, or steal it when its functionaries can conjure up a crime. If you don’t trust the dollar, and you shouldn’t, be like Uncle Sam: keep some money in gold and Gold 2.0.last_img read more

• International Speculator editor Dave Forest says

first_img• International Speculator editor Dave Forest says trade war fears are overblown… Dave is our in-house geologist. He knows more about commodities than anyone I know who’s not named Doug Casey, of course.And he had this to say about the trade war recently:Trade war fears are overblown. The U.S.-China trade dispute is no excuse to sit out the coming bull market in commodities. This is a trend you’ll want to keep on your radar for the foreseeable future.And there’s a simple reason for this.• China can’t afford to let the trade war escalate… It has one of the world’s fastest-growing economies. And it will soon have the largest middle class in the world.But its economy would come to a standstill without copper and nickel. Not only that, China gets most of these base metals from other countries.See for yourself. This is a chart that Dave and his team put together recently. The orange bars represent refined production, a proxy for demand. The blue bars show mine output, or domestic supply.You can see that refined production far exceeds mine output. This tells you just how much China depends on foreign sources for copper.• China’s nickel supply is even more dire… According to Dave, domestic mines supply only 14% of China’s nickel needs. Take a look.To make a long story short: China simply cannot allow the trade war to escalate. If it does, its entire economy would unravel.It shouldn’t come as a surprise that China is trying to deescalate matters. Dave wrote in last month’s issue of International Speculator:On September 30, China’s Ministry of Finance announced it is reducing general import tariffs on base metals and steel from 11.5% to 8.4%. The Ministry also announced duty cuts on a wider slate of minerals and gemstones from 6.6% to 5.4%.It’s also worth noting that China originally planned to impose a 25% tariff on liquified natural gas but later dropped the rate to 10%. Of course, supply is only one side of the coin…• Demand also needs to be strong for base metals prices to rise… I bring this up because many people think China’s economy is headed for a “hard landing.”But once again, Dave sees the situation differently:Recent reports from China suggest the government is moving quickly to cushion any blow from a trade-related economic slump.For one, officials at the national level have pushed forward new bond financing for local government infrastructure projects. That’s in stark contrast to the first half of 2018, when federal officials had been tightening financing to local developers.The Chinese government now appears intent on launching a new wave of economic stimulus projects. Approvals from China’s National Development and Reform Commission have seen a sharp lift since July – coinciding almost exactly with the escalation of the trade war.In other words, Dave believes China’s economy is in much better shape than people realize.When you combine that with lower tariffs, you have the ingredients for much higher metals prices.Most people don’t realize this. All they hear about is how the trade war is intensifying and how China is headed for a major economic slowdown. But Dave says those fears are wildly overblown.• So consider speculating on these base metals if you haven’t yet… You can easily do this by buying shares in a major mining company.Just be sure to treat any bet on higher commodity prices as a speculation. Only bet money that you can afford to lose. Use stop losses. And take profits when they come.I also encourage you to check out Dave’s research. He recently recommended the top stock to own as the trade war unfolds. It’s in a prime position to help China… and it has massive upside ahead. International Speculator subscribers can access the issue here.If you’re not a subscriber, you can access this pick by signing up today. And that’s not the only money-making opportunity you can take advantage of… Dave just released a new video about a breakthrough in electric vehicle tech that needs to be on your radar today. Watch the video and learn more about a subscription here.Regards,Justin Spittler New Orleans, LA November 29, 2018P.S. I also recommend reading Dave’s recent essays below. They all show that the commodities sector is gearing up for a rally. Read on to see the top metals that need to be in your portfolio today… Legendary Growth Investor Announces Major BUY SignalJust released: Louis Navellier just posted critical research about a massive market shift dead ahead. His last major buy alert turned $100,000 into $1.2 million in about one year. Now he’s sharing a NEW Buy Signal that could be his biggest ever. Don’t miss this chance to get his new alert before it goes offline. “It’s Time to Buy Silicon Valley’s Favorite Metal” China to CEO of World’s #1 Electric Car Company: You Lose.In the race to make electric cars cheaper than gas and diesel vehicles, the winner was always thought to be the #1 U.S. electric car company. But what China will do any day now could catapult it to the #1 spot… and solidify its position as the world leader. Reader MailbagYour comments continue to roll in on Doug Casey’s interview on the migrant caravan…Hey Doug. Been reading your stuff for 10 years. Generally enjoy it. Loved Ayn Rand in my 20s… now I see where it falls apart. I’m a Canadian millennial. Anyways. This article lacked empathy. I like when you write finance/economy articles because there isn’t much emotion in it. But when you apply your logic and rational thought to sensitive human subjects like the caravan it just comes across as mean, uncaring, and unloving. The idea that everything should be private property so you can kick the mooching homeless off all lawns is sad. I get it. I remember how Ayn Rand taught me about moochers and they suck the producers dry, forever taking. As a white educated male, it made sense to me! But not everyone is like me. Maybe that homeless guy is mentally ill. Maybe he got sick and lost everything. I have friends who are on government handouts because they lost their jobs. They don’t like how it feels and actively look for work so they can get off the “dole” but they appreciate it in the meantime so they can feed themselves and keep a roof over their head. Yes, that intent of government spending CAN work.Anyways. Just please try and have a bit more empathy for people. At the end of the day who knows why we are here and for what purpose, so lead with kindness. Can’t hurt…— Mike Recommended Link — By Justin Spittler, editor, Casey Daily DispatchThe trade war has claimed its biggest victim.…Apple (AAPL).Apple sells the wildly popular iPhone, iPad, and MacBook. It’s one of the most recognized companies on the planet. It was the world’s most valuable publicly traded company until Microsoft (MSFT) overtook it on Monday.So how did a company this powerful get caught up in the trade war? Simple. On Monday, President Trump threatened to introduce a 10% tariff on consumer electronic products made in China.This would impact the iPhone and other Apple products…• Trump did this because he thinks the Chinese are screwing the U.S. on trade… But more tariffs wouldn’t just hurt the Chinese. They’d hurt everyday Americans, too.This is because tariffs make imported goods more expensive. And if the iPhone becomes pricier, people will think twice about buying one.That’s the last thing Apple can afford. Recommended Linkcenter_img “Is the “Donald Trump of Asia” About to Send Nickel to the Moon?” — “Revealed: Silicon Valley’s Plan to Transform the Mining Industry” • Demand for the iPhone appears to be weakening… I say this because some of Apple’s suppliers recently cut forecasts. Apple has also reportedly canceled a production boost for its new iPhone XR model.This tells us the new iPhone model isn’t selling as well as expected.That’s triggered a huge sell-off. In fact, Apple is now trading 23% below its peak in early October. But it will surely head lower if Trump makes good on his threat to hit the iPhone with tariffs.Of course, Apple isn’t the only company that’s been hit hard by the trade war. Harley-Davidson, MillerCoors, and Jack Daniel’s have all been caught on the wrong side of tariffs.• The trade war is also making resource investors nervous… Just look at what copper’s been doing recently. Its price fell about 16% after Trump hit nearly $50 billion worth of Chinese imports with a 25% tariff in June. Other base metals were also hit by trade war concerns. Nickel, for instance, fell by 32% after Trump announced tariffs in June. Zinc plunged 23% over the same timeframe.Those are huge declines for such short periods. But they were totally unwarranted.You see, none of those metals were targeted in tariffs. Instead, finished products like lasers and laundry equipment were singled out. Still, that didn’t stop many investors from dumping these metals. In other words, the trade war isn’t something resource investors should fear… It’s an opportunity.But don’t take my word for it… Details here View his announcement here I read your views on the “migrant caravan” and some thoughts immediately come to mind. First and foremost, and completely overlooked in your piece, is the fact that millions of indigenous peoples from Central America were dispossessed of their lands, forced into slave labor, and when they refused, were murdered by American financed, ultra-right wing, neo-Nazi governments. These governments were largely installed by the CIA, backed and financed by America. Justice? I had the pleasure to work in Guatemala for a short period of time, and learned firsthand of the situation there, now and historically.Secondly, and you make reference to it, the situation in Europe today, with perhaps millions of “migrants” from north Africa. I think maybe the time has come to recognize this problem for what it really is. These are not migrants, they are largely refugees, fleeing an area which has been bombed “back to the stone age” by American and NATO forces, illegally. They have no homes to go back to, infrastructure has been destroyed, places of worship bombed, markets bombed, schools and hospitals bombed. Families destroyed, killed, split.America and the NATO countries are beginning to pay for their aggressions, and rightly so. At some point, some very prominent American and European leaders might well find themselves before an international court, in a vain attempt to justify their deeds. These are not nice things to contemplate, but responsibility eventually comes home. — DonAs always, if you have any questions or suggestions for the Dispatch, send them to us at feedback@caseyresearch.com.In Case You Missed It…Last night, Doug Casey joined Bill Bonner and Mark Ford in what was one of the most important events we’ve ever held. If you missed it, you can watch a free replay right here.last_img read more

Threequarters of a million people would likely lo

first_imgThree-quarters of a million people would likely lose their food stamps later this year under a new proposal by the Trump administration. The goal is to encourage able-bodied adults to go to work and get off government aid. But opponents predict people would go hungry instead, if the rule goes into effect. A public comment period, which ends Tuesday, has so far drawn more than 28,000 comments overwhelmingly against the proposed rule. Those affected by the proposed changes to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits are known as able-bodied adults without dependents, or ABAWDs. There were close to 4 million adults in this category receiving food stamps in 2016. About three-quarters of them did not work, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue says the administration thinks these people should be able to get jobs, especially now that the nation’s unemployment rate is the lowest it has been in years. “We believe the purpose of our welfare system should help people to become independent rather than permanent dependency,” he recently told the House Agriculture Committee. “We think we are helping people to, again, move into the dignity of work and the respect of providing for their families.”To do that, the administration would stop food stamps after three months for ABAWDs who don’t work, volunteer or get job training for at least 20 hours a week. That’s already the law, but many states waive that requirement in high unemployment areas. The Trump administration would make those waivers much more difficult to come by.It’s part of a broader effort by the administration to impose tighter work requirements on recipients of government aid, such as housing vouchers and Medicaid. A federal judge last week blocked two states, Arkansas and Kentucky, from implementing the Medicaid work rule, calling it “arbitrary and capricious.”But the concept has strong Republican support. “People believe that able-bodied people who can work, should work,” Tennessee Republican Rep. Scott Desjarlais told Perdue, “Do you have any idea why there might be so much pushback and concerns on this measure?””I have no clue,” Perdue responded.At the Franciscan Center in Baltimore, where low-income individuals come every day for food, clothing and other help, people think they have a pretty good idea why opposition is so strong. “Right now, I’m literally dependent on places like this,” says 41-year-old Alton Royal, who carries a small plastic bag containing a couple of rolls and two peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. “This is my meal for the rest of the day.”Royal says he gets $185 a month in SNAP benefits, but he worries he’ll lose them under the proposed rules because he can’t find work. He has a severely injured leg and a criminal record, which limit his options.”But still I have to eat. I have to still try and find employment but I have those barriers against me,” Royal says.Others here are struggling with other barriers, such as homelessness, mental illness and drug addiction. Some already work, but not enough to meet the 20-hour-a-week threshold. One man says he has a janitorial job at the Baltimore Orioles’ stadium, but only when the baseball team is in town. In the winter, he relies on food stamps.”Everybody I know wants to work,” says Royal. “Everybody.”Michael J. Wilson, director of Maryland Hunger Solutions, an advocacy group that opposes the rule, says threatening to take people’s food away won’t help them get a job. By the administration’s own admission, the change would save $8 billion over five years, largely because 755,000 individuals will not meet the new requirements. Wilson estimates that about 30,000 of them will be in Maryland. He says that it’s not just the lack of jobs, but the lack of other options.”If all those folks showed up at a job training site tomorrow, they would swamp the offices,” he says. “There’s not enough space for them to be able to do this.”Perdue notes that there would be exceptions for those who are disabled or can’t work for one reason of another, but it’s largely up to the states. States are not required to guarantee an individual a job, training or volunteer opportunity before stopping their benefits. Looking for work only counts toward the required 20 hours if it’s paired with an education and training program.Craig Gundersen, a professor of agriculture and consumer economics at the University of Illinois, questions the administration’s assertion that imposing work requirements will move more SNAP recipients into the labor force. He says there’s no evidence that receiving food stamps discourages work. “This idea that people are ripping off the system or something, that’s just not true,” he says. In fact, food stamp benefits are structured to encourage work, he says, by reducing benefits gradually as income grows. Gundersen also says the proposal “is just not consistent with the goals of the program,” which is to reduce hunger.For the most part, SNAP has enjoyed strong bipartisan support. A similar work requirement was rejected by Congress last year when lawmakers debated a new farm bill. President Trump announced the proposed rule the same day he signed that bill into law. As a result, congressional Democrats have threatened to sue if the change goes into effect later this year, as the administration intends. Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.last_img read more

European elections unprecedented viewing figures for Parliaments campaign film

first_imgSince its launch on Thursday 25 April, the three-minute film has been viewed over 75 million times; unprecedented figures for an institutional campaign (figures updated to Thursday 2nd May at 09.00 am).The film is subtitled in all 24 EU official languages as well as other EU languages, different national versions of the same language (33 in total), plus five worldwide major languages (Arabic, Chinese, Russian, Hindi and Turkish). It has also been produced in 31 sign languages and international sign, with the support of the European Union of the Deaf (EUD).Directed by award-winning Frédéric Planchon, and developed and produced by Parliament’s contractor, European Broadcast Partners and their sub-contractor & Co./NoA, it documents the intense, beautiful and fragile moments when new-born children come into this world across Europe and aims to make us reflect on why we vote. All the births featured in the film are real documentary footage. As one of the centrepieces of the 2019 European Parliament election campaign, the film intends to make Europeans aware of their shared values, emotions and responsibilities. In the words of the young girl narrating the film: “Each of us can leave a mark, but together we can make a real difference”.The European Parliament’s campaign also includes the thistimeimvoting.eu platform to get people involved in the European elections. So far, more than 270.000 people have signed up.The Europe-wide elections will be held in all EU countries between 23 and 26 May.WhatsApp <a href=’http://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/ck.php?n=ab2c8853&amp;cb={random}’ target=’_blank’><img src=’https://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/avw.php?zoneid=97&amp;cb={random}&amp;n=ab2c8853&amp;ct0={clickurl_enc}’ border=’0′ alt=” /></a> SharePrintlast_img read more

Cutting Printing Costs With Tablets

first_img January 27, 2011 Agam Shah Next Article Growth Strategies 2019 Entrepreneur 360 List Cutting Printing Costs With Tablets Add to Queue As the mobile workforce increasingly uses tablets and smartphones, a nonprofit group hopes to use the devices to reduce paperwork and cut printing costs.ChildNet, which focuses on child welfare, will use tablets and smartphones to upload and access case files remotely, which could ultimately help cut printing costs, said Emilio Benitez, president and CEO of ChildNet.ChildNet, which is based in and based in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, works with Broward County to manage cases related to adoption and independent living of abused, abandoned and neglected children. The organization is moving toward using the Android mobile platform to help case workers remotely access documents.Printing is a huge expense for the small nonprofit, and cutting down on the paperwork could add up to significant cost savings.”For us, it’s a lot of money, it’s very measurable,” Benitez said.Case workers on an average spend 40 percent to 50 percent of their time filing and processing paperwork, and each child on an average has five binders, with each binder consisting of 550 pages. The time spent on paperwork also impedes the ability for case workers to spend more time with the children and families they serve, Benitez said.Tablets and smartphones could also save case workers from lugging around cartloads of binders when at court or when investigating a case on the road, Benitez said.The company currently uses HTC smartphones based on the Windows Mobile platform to access documents remotely. Windows Mobile is expressly designed for smartphones, and the organization is moving toward Google’s Android development platform, which is used on both smartphones and tablets.The cost related to printing, imaging and document management are usually hidden and can be very high, said Crawford Del Prete, executive vice president of research products and chief research officer at IDC. The costs could account for 11 percent of revenue for low-end manufacturing firms, and up to 15 percent for health-care firms, he said.One of the biggest savings could be achieved by controlling document printing and achieving better data flow, Del Prete said.It’s just not about the device, though. More workers are going mobile, and the amount of data available is exploding, so organizations need to manage mobile devices in sync with the data flow to effectively cut costs, Del Prete said.ChildNet is working with Ricoh to digitize existing case files so they become accessible through mobile devices, and has implemented an indexing system to provide quick access to certain data in compliance with HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act).Ricoh provides a number of options for organizations to print documents from tablets and smartphones, said Shogo Hyakutake, associate director of the global marketing group at Ricoh.Users can send an e-mail to a printer attached to the Internet, or use a remote printing service. Ricoh can also provide printer drivers for devices based on the Android OS to clients, Hyakutake said.Ricoh has not yet looked at developing drivers for the iPad as Apple maintains strong control over development of its devices, Hyakutake said. But the company may look at developing iPad drivers if consumer demand increases.Ricoh is investing US$300 million over the next three years to expand its managed document services offerings, including mobile printing services. That is a shift in strategy for Ricoh, which in the past has heavily relied on its printer business.But ChildNet will likely stick with Android in the future as it is gaining more traction in the smartphone and tablet markets, said Dipak Parekh, chief financial officer at ChildNet.Android provides the capability for ChildNet to build a security apparatus for mobile devices to access documents. Considering the security and sensitivity of documents, Android also provides the flexibility to test the application before full implementation.Parekh said that ChildNet has provided its Windows Mobile software to the Florida Department of Children and Families, which took some parts of the program to work on the BlackBerry platform. But for ChildNet, the screen space on Blackberry is small, and it does not provide enough real estate to record signatures, Parekh said. The HTC phones provide enough screen space for a case worker to record a signature, upload a picture and record the location through GPS.Parekh is looking at the Apple’s iOS platform, which is used on the iPhone and iPad, but will write applications only after the OS “is proven.”center_img 4 min read –shares Brought to you by PCWorld The only list that measures privately-held company performance across multiple dimensions—not just revenue. Learn how a small nonprofit is seeking to save money and reduce paperwork by adopting tablet computers and smartphones. Apply Now »last_img read more

Apple Considering Expansion Into Wearable Glasses

first_img This story originally appeared on Reuters Register Now » Apple Next Article Apple Inc. is considering expanding into wearable glass headsets and has talked about the project with potential suppliers, Bloomberg reported citing people familiar with the matter.The wearable headset would show images, along with other information and may use augmented reality, according to the report.Chief Executive Tim Cook, who has been struggling with a slowdown in iPhone sales in recent quarters, said earlier this year that the company would continue to invest a lot into augmented reality.  Apple, the world’s largest technology company, has ordered a small number of near-eye displays for testing but has not obtained enough for production on a larger scale, the report added.Apple declined to comment.The move would make Apple the latest tech company to venture into wearable glasses.Alphabet Inc.’s discontinued its own wearable glass headset, Google Glass, and closed the social media account linked to the device earlier this year, ending its attempt to popularize the expensive devices with consumers.The device received plenty of attention when it was launched in 2012, but quickly ran into problems with its awkward appearance and privacy concerns over video recording.Snap, an $18 billion company which makes the popular messaging app Snapchat, also launched its own video-camera sunglasses last week.(Reporting by Narottam Medhora in Bengaluru; Editing by Bernard Orr) Add to Queue Free Webinar | July 31: Secrets to Running a Successful Family Business The wearable headset would show images, along with other information, and may use augmented reality. November 15, 2016 2 min read Apple Considering Expansion Into Wearable Glasses Reuters Image credit: Pres Panayotov / Shutterstock Learn how to successfully navigate family business dynamics and build businesses that excel. –shareslast_img read more

Pill that reverses brain damage could be on the horizon

first_img Source:Chemical Conversion of Human Fetal Astrocytes into Neurons through Modulation of Multiple Signaling Pathways We identified the most efficient chemical formula among the hundreds of drug combinations that we tested. By using four molecules that modulate four critical signaling pathways in human astrocytes, we can efficiently turn human astrocytes — as many as 70 percent — into functional neurons.”Jiu-Chao Yin, Study Author By Sally Robertson, B.Sc.Feb 12 2019Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have made important progress in designing a drug that could recover brain function in cases of severe brain damage due to injury or diseases such as Alzheimer’s. Vitaly Sosnovskiy | ShutterstockThe work builds on a previous study where the team managed to convert human fetal glial cells called astrocytes into functional neurons. However, that required using a combination of nine molecules – too many for the formula to be translated into a clinically useful solution.As reported in the journal Stem Cell Reports, the team has now successfully streamlined the process so that only four molecules are needed – an achievement that could lead to pill for repairing brain damage.center_img The researchers report that the new neurons survived for more than seven months in the laboratory environment and that they functioned like normal brain cells, forming networks and communicating with one another using chemical and electrical signaling.“The most significant advantage of the new approach is that a pill containing small molecules could be distributed widely in the world, even reaching rural areas without advanced hospital systems,” says Chen.“My ultimate dream is to develop a simple drug delivery system, like a pill, that can help stroke and Alzheimer’s patients around the world to regenerate new neurons and restore their lost learning and memory capabilities,” he continued.Now, the years of effort the team has put into simplifying the drug formula has finally paid off and taken the researchers a step closer towards realizing that dream.last_img read more

Study of MS patients shows 18 were given wrong diagnoses

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Apr 8 2019A recent study found that nearly 18 percent of patients diagnosed with multiple sclerosis before being referred to two major Los Angeles medical centers for treatment actually had been misdiagnosed with the autoimmune disease.The retrospective study, led by investigator Marwa Kaisey, MD, along with Nancy Sicotte, MD, interim chair of Neurology and director of the Cedars-Sinai Multiple Sclerosis and Neuroimmunology Center, and researchers from UCLA and the University of Vermont, analyzed the cases of 241 patients who had been diagnosed by other physicians and then referred to the Cedars-Sinai or UCLA MS clinics over the course of a year.Investigators sought to determine how many patients were misdiagnosed with MS, and identify common characteristics among those who had been misdiagnosed.”The diagnosis of MS is tricky. Both the symptoms and MRI testing results can look like other conditions, such as stroke, migraines and vitamin B12 deficiency,” Kaisey said. “You have to rule out any other diagnoses, and it’s not a perfect science.”The investigators found that many patients who came to the medical centers with a previous diagnosis of MS did not fulfill the criteria for that diagnosis. The patients spent an average of four years being treated for MS before receiving a correct diagnosis.”When we see a patient like that, even though they come to us with an established diagnosis, we just start from the beginning,” Sicotte said.The most common correct diagnosis was migrane (16 percent), followed by radiologically isolated syndrome, a condition in which patients do not experience symptoms of MS even though their imaging tests look similar to those of MS patients. Other correct diagnoses included spondylopathy (a disorder of the vertebrae) and neuropathy (nerve damage).Related StoriesNature of social cognitive deficits in people with progressive multiple sclerosisHigh levels of blood lipids may worsen multiple sclerosis symptoms in obese patientsNovel imaging molecule reveals brain changes linked to progressive MSAmong those misdiagnosed, 72 percent had been prescribed MS treatments. Forty-eight percent of these patients received therapies that carry a known risk of developing progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, a serious disease in the white matter of the brain, caused by viral infection.”I’ve seen patients suffering side effects from the medication they were taking for a disease they didn’t have,” Kaisey said. “Meanwhile, they weren’t getting treatment for what they did have. The cost to the patient is huge–medically, psychologically, financially.”Investigators estimated that the unnecessary treatments identified in this study alone cost almost $10 million.The investigators hope that the results of this study, which will be published in May’s issue of the peer-reviewed journal Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders, along with recently funded research into new biomarkers and improved imaging techniques, will help improve diagnostic procedures and help prevent future MS misdiagnoses.Funding for the new research includes $60,000 from Cedars-Sinai Precision Health, a partnership among scientists, clinicians and industry designed to advance personalized medicine. Kaisey said that she hopes these studies will also lead to better availability of treatment for patients who do have the disease.”The first step, which is what we’ve done here, is to identify the problem, so now we’re working on potential solutions,” she said. Source:https://www.cedars-sinai.org/newsroom/study-of-multiple-sclerosis-patients-shows-18-percent-misdiagnosed/last_img read more

Emergency alert test going out to mobile phones nationwide

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further Citation: Emergency alert test going out to mobile phones nationwide (2018, October 2) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-10-emergency-mobile-nationwide.html © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. About 225 million electronic devices across the United States will get alerts Wednesday afternoon as the Federal Emergency Management Agency conducts a test. False tsunami alert sent to US coasts A tone will sound at 2:18 p.m. EDT, similar to that of an Amber Alert or flood watch warning, and the subject of the alert will read: “Presidential Alert” and text will say: “THIS IS A TEST of the National Wireless Emergency Alert System. No action is needed.”It is the first test of the national wireless emergency system by FEMA. The message will be broadcast by cell towers for 30 minutes, so it’s possible some people may get it at a different time. The alerts will sound as long as the device is turned on—even if it’s on mute or do not disturb, and it may also appear on smart watches, officials said.A second alert on television broadcast and radio will go off at 2:20 p.m. EDT. The TV and radio alert has been tested for several years.The system test is for a high-level “presidential” alert that would be used only in a nationwide emergency. It is being completed in coordination with the Federal Communications Commission. FEMA officials said Tuesday they would share test result data on how the testing went with mobile carriers to help ensure the system works well in a true emergency.Phones with mobile carriers that participate in the wireless emergency alert system, which sends out information on hazardous weather, or missing children, will get the alert. FEMA officials estimate it will reach about 75 percent of all mobile phones in the country, including phones on all of the major carriers.The wireless alert system launched in 2012. While users can opt out of messages on missing children and natural disasters, they can’t opt out of the presidential alerts, which are issued at the direction of the White House and activated by FEMA.FEMA officials said the administration can only send such an alert for national emergencies or if the public were in peril, rules outlined in a 2006 law, and they say it can’t be used for any sort of personal message from the president.In New York, U.S. District Judge Katherine Polk Failla rejected a last-minute effort to block the test. Three people sued, claiming it violates their constitutional rights. The plaintiffs said the alert system fails to give people the chance to opt out.But Failla called the constitutional questions raised by the lawsuit significant and urged the litigants to find attorneys to help them proceed. She said she believes the plaintiffs want to ensure that President Donald Trump doesn’t turn the alert system into a second Twitter feed.The judge asked a government lawyer if there were standards in place to prevent someone from using the system for political purposes.Assistant U.S. Attorney Anthony Sun said telephones were being added to a century-old alert system that is controlled by law. A FEMA lawyer said via a phone connection to the courtroom that decisions about alerts are at the discretion of the president, just as are many other decisions involving national security.last_img read more

New program picks out targets in a crowd quickly and efficiently

first_imgIt can be harder for computers to find Waldo, an elusive character that hides within crowds in a popular children’s book series, than it is for humans. Credit: CC0 Public Domain Tweaking tools to track tweets over time Provided by Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), Singapore Citation: New program picks out targets in a crowd quickly and efficiently (2019, February 22) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-02-crowd-quickly-efficiently.html Journal information: Nature Communicationscenter_img Now, an A*STAR researcher and her colleagues have developed a biologically-inspired program that could enable computers to identify real-life Waldos and other targets more efficiently.Computer image analysis is routinely used in medicine, security, and rescue. Speed is often critical in these efforts, says Mengmi Zhang, a computer scientist at A*STAR’s Institute for Infocomm Research, who led the study. She cites the use of computers to help find victims of natural disasters, such as earthquakes.But these efforts are often hampered because computers lack human intuition. A person can quickly spot a dog in a crowded space, for instance, even if they have never seen that particular dog before. A computer, by contrast, needs to be trained using thousands of images of different dogs, and even then, they can falter when looking for a new dog whose image they have not encountered previously.This weakness could be particularly problematic when scanning for weapons, says Zhang. A computer trained to look for knives and guns, might overlook another sharp object. “If there is one sharp metal stick which has not been seen in the training set, it doesn’t mean the passenger should be able to take it on board the airplane,” says Zhang.Current computer searches also tend to be slow because the computer must scan every part of an image in sequence, paying equal attention to each part. Humans, however, rapidly shift their attention between several different locations in an image to find their target. Zhang and her colleagues’ wanted to understand how humans do this so efficiently. They presented 45 people with crowded images and asked them to hunt for a target, say, a sheep. They monitored how the subjects’ eyes darted around the scene, fixating briefly on different locations in the image. They found that, on average, people could locate the sheep in around 640 milliseconds. This corresponded to switching the location of their gaze, on average, just over two and a half times.The team then developed a computer model to implement this more human-like search strategy in the hunt for a dog. Rather than looking for a target that was identical to an image of a dog given beforehand, the model was trained to look for something that had similar features to the example image. This enabled the model to generalize from a single dog image, to the “general concept of a dog,” and quickly pick out other dogs it had not seen before, explains Zhang.The researchers tested how effective the new computer visual search model was by measuring the number of times the computer had to fixate on different locations in a scene before finding its target. “What surprises us is that by using our method, computers can search images as fast as humans, even when searching for objects they’ve never seen before,” says Zhang. The computer was even as good as humans at finding Waldo.The team is now programming their model with a better understanding of context. For example, humans naturally understand that a cup is more likely to be sitting on a table than floating in the air. Once implemented, this should improve the model’s efficiency even further, says Zhang, adding, “Waldo cannot hide anymore.” More information: Mengmi Zhang et al. Finding any Waldo with zero-shot invariant and efficient visual search, Nature Communications (2018). DOI: 10.1038/s41467-018-06217-x This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore furtherlast_img read more

Construction sector gasps as Chennai grapples with water crisisConstruction sector gasps as