WITH WORKIN MOMS CBC RAISES THE BAR FOR CANADIAN TV

first_img Login/Register With: Facebook Advertisement Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement I never thought I’d say this, but CBC-TV is on a roll. It began in 2015, with the debut of Schitt’s Creek, a quietly amusing sitcom by Canadian Jewish father-son duo Eugene and Dan Levy. In 2016, CBC introduced Kim’s Convenience, a fluffy story of Korean shopkeepers that has proven to be, if not gut-busting comedy, at least a cute, polished family comedy pushing minority representation across the country.Then came 2017, when Workin’ Moms walked in the door, and elevated CBC-TV to a whole other level.Unlike its saturated siblings, Workin’ Moms adopts a sharper tone, mixing adult themes with blunt swears. Showrunner and star Catherine Reitman has created a firmly 21st-century feminist series on par with other great contemporary, women-led televised series, down to the main character baring her breasts in the pilot episode. (My wife pointed out this bizarre trend to me: the leads of Girls, Orange is the New Black, GLOW and The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel all appear shirtless, not throughout the series, but pointedly in the pilot, as if complying with some unspoken rite of passage.) WORKIN’ MOMS Twitterlast_img read more

JUSTIN BIEBER FREAKS OVER BEING RELATED TO RYAN GOSLING AVRIL LAVIGNE THE

first_imgJUSTIN BIEBER FREAKS OVER BEING RELATED TO RYAN GOSLING & AVRIL LAVIGNE: ‘THE BEST DAY OF MY LIFEAfter doing a search on Ancestry.com, Justin Bieber is claiming he’s related to fellow Canadians Ryan Gosling & Avril Lavigne — posting that the findings seem ‘super legit.’According to Justin Bieber, his family just got bigger! The 25-year-old pop star did a genealogy search on Ancestry.com, and discovered that, apparently, he’s related to fellow Canadians Ryan Gosling and Avril Lavigne. “I also just found out that I’m related to both Ryan gosling and Avril Lavigne this is the best day of my life..,” Justin posted on his Instagram Saturday, August 31. “it seems super legit it’s on ancestry.com.” The website claims to have “world’s largest collection of online records” — which is 20 billion. READ MOREJustin Bieber is seen on Aug. 29, 2019 in Los Angeles, Calif. (Photo: BG002/Bauer-Griffin/GC Images)JUSTIN BIEBER GIVES GOSPEL PERFORMANCE AT CHURCH SERVICEJustin Bieber recently gave a gospel performance at Churchome in Beverly Hills and shared the experience on Instagram. “Sang at church last night,” Bieber wrote. “God is pulling me through a hard season. Having trust in Jesus at your worst times is the absolute hardest. But he is faithful to complete what he started.“I also want to thank my wife for being such a huge support in my life through this season…” the Sorry singer continued. “It says in the bible count it ALL JOY when you face trials of various kinds. READ MORE Advertisement STEPHEN BALDWIN REVEALS WHY DAUGHTER HAILEY AND HER HUSBAND JUSTIN BIEBER WANT A RELIGIOUS WEDDINGStephen Baldwin said he’s very excited for the upcoming “very fun wedding” in South Carolina. The actor, 53, gave updates on the couple’s wedding plans to TMZ, saying: “I just think that as Christians and as believers they understand that if you don’t have the God’s spirit working in your marriage it just makes it more and more difficult to make it work and have peace and find happiness.”Baldwin added, “Weddings and marriage are supposed to be a holy commitment, one onto another.” READ MORE Advertisement Login/Register With:center_img Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

NUNAVUT CRIME

first_imgAPTN NATIONAL NEWSNUNAVUT IS KNOWN FOR THE POLAR BEAR, THE INUKSHUK, THE NORTHWEST PASSAGE, AND ALSO FOR CRIME.NUNAVUT’S CRIME RATES ARE STAGGERING.OUR KENT DRISCOLL SHOWS YOU THAT IN JUST THIS MONTH ALONE, NUNAVUT FINDS ITSELF AWASH IN CRIME – AND ASKS WHY.last_img

Saskatchewan First Nations take Treaty fight to legislature

first_imgAPTN National NewsWith provincial organizations like the Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations in disarray, First Nations in Saskatchewan took matters into their own hands.A march was organized to the provincial legislature to call on the provincial government to respect their Treaty obligations.APTN National News reporter Delaney Windigo has the story.last_img

High school Redman mascot causing a stir

first_imgAPTN National NewsA Saskatoon high school mascot is causing a lot of controversy.But not everyone wants to get rid of it.APTN’s Chris Stewart has more.last_img

NDP MP says residential school survivors facing betrayal of justice promise

first_imgAPTN National NewsAn NDP MP says he’s received the brush-off from the body responsible for settling claims from Indian residential school survivors after asking when it knew federal government lawyers were supressing information about brutal abuses at a school in Fort Albany, Ont.Charlie Angus, NDP MP for Timmins-James Bay, wrote to Daniel Shapiro, the head of the Indian Residential Schools Adjudication Secretariat, last month saying the body needed to come clean about what it knew and when to protect the integrity of the Indian Residential School Settlement Agreement.Shapiro wrote back saying Angus should take up his issue with Justice Minister Peter MacKay or Aboriginal Affairs Minister Bernard Valcourt.“As it appears that fundamentally your concerns continue to relate to the conduct of Canada and its representatives, I ask that you direct your further communications in this regard to (MacKay) and/or (Valcourt),” wrote Shapiro, in his Dec. 3 letter to Angus. “As an officer of the court, it would not be appropriate for me to comment further in the political realm on matters that may be before the courts in the future.”Angus said he was disappointed by Shapiro’s response.“It’s pretty depressing when there obviously has been a failure of the legal process and the people in charge of the legal process say it’s a political process,” said Angus. “If (Independent Assessment Process) is not going to stand and insist that the defendant meet the basic legal obligations as laid out by the Ontario Superior Court then this process is a betrayal of the promise that was made to the survivors that justice would be done.”This past January an Ontario Superior Court of Justice judge ordered the federal government to hand over thousands of documents from an OPP investigation into abuse, including the use of an electric chair on students, at St. Anne’s Residential School. The investigation, from the 1990s, led to convictions.St. Anne’s school survivors went to court a second time in June to force Ottawa to turn over the transcript of St. Anne’s employee Anna Wesley’s trial. Wesley was convicted in 1999 for giving students a noxious substance.Justice Canada lawyers had been sitting on the documents, claiming it didn’t have the authority to hand them over because the OPP transferred them on condition of anonymity.Justice Paul Perell found that Ottawa’s refusal to hand over the documents “compromised the (independent assessment process) and denied the claimant’s access to justice.”As part of the residential school settlement agreement, an independent assessment process (IAP) was created to deal with claims of abuse and compensation. The hearings are held before an independent adjudicator who hears presentations from claimants, church and federal government representatives. Documents are also used to support claims for compensation.Many of the survivors from St. Anne’s school went into their hearings without any legal representation and did not know evidence existed to prove their claims of abuse.Despite the court victories, Angus said the St. Anne’s survivors are still facing obstacles and are planning to again take the issue to the courts.“We are still seeing documents being blacked-out, (Ottawa officials) lied in court about the evidence narrative,” said Angus. “(Ottawa) was told they breached the legal rights of the survivors and they continue to act defiantly.”Angus said he now plans to take the issue to the IAP oversight committee.news@aptn.ca@APTNNewslast_img read more

AFNs Bellegarde demanding immediate meeting with Valcourt

first_imgAPTN National News OTTAWA—Assembly of First Nations National Chief Perry Bellegarde is demanding an “immediate meeting” with Aboriginal Affairs Minister Bernard Valcourt in the wake of a deadly fire on a Saskatchewan First Nation that left two children dead.Bellegarde sent a letter to Valcourt via fax on Friday saying he wanted to discuss lifting the two per cent cap placed on yearly funding for First Nations. Bellegarde said the cap has left many First Nation communities struggling with limited resources which creates situations like the tragic one last Tuesday on the Makwa Sahgaiehcan First Nation.“The situation is at a crisis level and the reasons all point to the fact the government of Canada provides insufficient funds to First Nations to adequately provide their members a safe and healthy environment,” said Bellegarde. “The time is now to work together to address the challenges facing First Nations in terms of fire prevention and protection. Directly related to this is an open and honest discussion on lifting the 2 per cent cap on First Nations funding.”Valcourt blamed Makwa Sahgaiehcan First Nation for not having the ability to fight the fire Tuesday that killed the two children. Facing questions from the NDP during question period Thursday, Valcourt said his department was giving First Nations adequate resources to deal with things like fire prevention and firefighting.“This particular band has received consistent funding for fire protection services,” said Valcourt. “And the fact of the matter is that each band council is responsible for fire protection on the reserve…That First Nation, like others, received sufficient funds to deal with fire safety.”Bellegarde said in his letter there was no point in blaming First Nations.“It is not the time to play politics or blame First Nations that are trying to do what they can with inadequate resources,” said Bellegarde. “That will not change the outcome of these tragic events.”The Chretien Liberals imposed the two per cent cap in the mid-1990s. Under the cap, overall funding for First Nations can’t grow more than two per cent a yearIn the letter, Bellegarde quotes former Aboriginal affairs deputy minister Scott Searson who told a Senate committee the cap was only supposed to be temporary. Bellegarde also mentioned an Aboriginal Affairs presentation that with tabled before the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal. Bellegarde said the departmental presentation shows the government is aware of the impact the two per cent cap has had on First Nations.“I am asking for an immediate meeting with you to advance this work. Time is of the essence,” said Bellegarde, in the letter. “The longer we live and operate under these restrictive policies the more we are jeopardizing the health and safety of First Nations citizens.”The Loon Lake volunteer fire department did not respond to the fire in Makwa Sahgaiehcan because the band was three months behind on its fire bill.Local RCMP officers were the first responders on the scene and they saw the biological father bring his two-year-old boy and 18-month-old daughter out of the burning home.Valcourt’s office says the department gave Makwa Sahgaiehcan $34,000 for fire prevention and services in the 2014-2015 fiscal year.news@aptn.ca@APTNnewslast_img read more

DNA tests confirm second switched at birth case in northern Manitoba

first_imgThe Canadian PressNORWAY HOUSE, Man. — A second set of DNA tests have confirmed that two men were switched at birth at a hospital in northern Manitoba in 1975.Former Manitoba aboriginal affairs minister Eric Robinson says the men from Norway House learned of the results Tuesday.He says the tests show Leon Swanson is the biological son of the woman who raised David Tait Jr.The 41-year-old men announced at a news conference last month that tests had revealed Tait is the son of the woman who raised Swanson.Robinson says the latest results were anticipated but needed for Swanson to move on.It’s the second case of a mix-up at the federally run Norway House Indian Hospital in the same year, and the government has tasked an independent third party to investigate what went wrong.Tests last November showed Luke Monias and Norman Barkman of nearby Garden Hill also went home from the Norway House hospital with each other’s families in 1975.Robinson, who has acted as a spokesman for the four men since they learned of the mix-ups, says he sent federal Health Minister Jane Philpott a letter two weeks ago requesting she sit down with the men and their families to discuss the anguish they’ve been through.“She hasn’t responded to my correspondence whatsoever,” said Robinson.“I know she’s got lots of responsibilities but this is equally important.”He said other officials have tried to contact the men but they only want to talk to Philpott.“They want to deal with the person ultimately responsible for the Indian hospital,” Robinson said.The two cases have raised the question of whether other babies could have been switched at birth at the hospital.Shortly after Swanson and Tait held their news conference, Health Canada announced that it is offering free DNA tests to anyone born at the Norway House hospital before 1980, when the facility started fitting newborns with identification bands.A spokesman said that due to privacy reasons, he can’t reveal if anyone has requested the tests.news@aptn.calast_img read more

First Nations housing crisis will take a lifetime to solve says AFN

first_imgThe Canadian PressNew federal money for First Nations housing is welcome but will not solve a monumental shortage for at least a generation says Assembly of First Nations Regional Chief Kevin Hart.“I don’t see it happening in my lifetime or in my children’s lifetime, to be honest,” Hart said during a break in the AFN’s housing and infrastructure conference held in Winnipeg.“We have 16, 18 people in a two-bedroom house (in Norway House, Man.). Now if that was to occur here in Winnipeg with a non-native family, would that be acceptable? The black mould that’s in our houses _ would that be acceptable here in Winnipeg? Would that be acceptable in Toronto?”The federal government has promised $8.4 billion over five years for infrastructure, education and other issues in First Nations communities. The housing portion over the next two years is forecast to be more than double previous levels at $450 million.The money is a fraction of what reports have indicated is needed. Internal government documents dated January 2015 and obtained by The Canadian Press early this year pegged the cost of fixing First Nations housing in Manitoba alone at $2 billion.Indigenous Affairs Minister Carolyn Bennett said the government realizes it has a long way to go.“We know that we’ve only begun, and what we’re hearing from coast to coast to coast is people are very happy with the beginning … but no, there is real need out there and we’re going to get going,” she said.In a 20-minute speech at the conference, Bennett said the government is developing ways to ensure funding flows faster to communities in need, and is looking for ways to ensure better, longer-lasting building materials can be used.Hart said cash for housing is needed quickly. He pointed to several communities that have seen a spike in suicides in recent years. Pimicikamak Cree Nation, known as Cross Lake, in northern Manitoba declared a state of emergency last March after six suicides in the community of 8,300.Overcrowded housing, often combined with inadequate recreational facilities and schools, is tied to the despair felt by many residents, he said.“It all relates and it interconnects with proper housing and infrastructure in our communities.”news@aptn.calast_img read more

Autumn Peltier up for Nobel childrens prize

first_img“I like to speak for the water because the water doesn’t have a voice,” said Peltier. “If nobody speaks up what will the water and environment be like in 10 to 20 years? What if we don’t have clean drinking water anywhere? We would all die if we didn’t have clean drinking water.”Peltier said she hopes others will join in her struggle to protect water around the world.“The reason I advocate for this is to inspire people to come together and try and purify the water,” said Peltier.She still remembers that day last December when she got her moment to speak directly to Trudeau. In an interview shortly after it happened Peltier described the encounter.“When I went up there, I was standing with the Elder, listening to what he was saying and I was told to give the prime minister the water bundle,” Peltier said, at the time. “And I said something to him. I said, ‘I am very unhappy with the choices you’ve made.’ And he said, ‘I understand that.’ And I started crying and all I got to say after that was, ‘the pipelines.’”Looking back, Peltier, who is from Wikwemikong, on Manitoulin Island in Ontario, said she didn’t know what she was going to tell the prime minister at the time and the words just tumbled out.“When I went up to give him the gift I didn’t what I was going to do. I just had this feeling. I guess my spirit just wanted to say something while I was there and it was an opportunity to just say it,” said Peltier. “When I think about what I said I am just trying to help my people and help my environment and it makes me feel proud.”The KidsRights organization will announce the winner of the prize Nov. 10.jbarrera@aptn.ca@JorgeBarrera Autumn Peltier, flanked by AFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde and AFN Elder Elmer Courchene presents a water bundle to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in December 2016.Jorge Barrera APTN NewsAutumn Peltier, a 13-year-old Wikwemikong girl who tearfully pleaded with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to protect the water is up for an international award.Autumn Peltier’s name came to be known across the country after she presented Trudeau with a water bundle of a copper bowl, a red cloth, tobacco and a small copper cup during an Assembly of First Nations meeting in December 2016. During the gift presentation, Peltier told Trudeau she was “unhappy” with his decision to approve the Kinder Morgan pipeline in British Columbia.Now Peltier is up for the International Children’s Peace Prize, known as the Nobel Prize for children. She is the only child out of 169 nominees from Canada.“When I found out that I was nominated for the award I was really excited and I am really excited to find out if I win or not,” said Peltier. “If I don’t win I am still really happy to be doing the work I am doing.”Peltier has dedicated herself to campaigning for water protection. This past July she was in Regina during the AFN’s general assembly to sign a treaty against the expansion of Alberta’s bitumen fields.last_img read more

Antipipeline activists rally at 100s of MP offices in day of action

first_imgAPTN NewsAnti-pipeline activists are planning to flood the offices of 100 MPs across Canada on Monday, calling on the federal government to rescind its “outrageous plan” to buy Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain project.“We can’t let our tax dollars go to a project that violates Indigenous rights and would threaten our shared climate,” reads the “day of action” event description.Organized by groups including the Coast Protectors, Greenpeace and the Council of Canadians, the rallies aim to put pressure on Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to scrap his $4.5-billion plan to buy Kinder Morgan’s pipeline.The rallies are planned for more than 100 MP offices across Canada, including more than 50 Liberal MP offices.Trudeau announced the buyout last week, after Kinder Morgan threatened to pull out of its $7.4-billion expansion project that would twin the existing pipeline from Edmonton to Burnaby, B.C.Finance Minister Bill Morneau said he expects Canadians will see it as a “bold decision,” but a necessary one because he argues no private sector firm would’ve been able to solve the issue.Morneau has said Ottawa is buying the project from Kinder Morgan Canada in order to help the expansion overcome political risks.He’s stressed it will allow Canada to find new export markets for its oil resources, with the long-term goal of finding a private-sector buyer to take over the pipeline.B.C. Premier John Horgan has gone to court to fight the project. He has said his concerns are rooted in what he’s called the limited scientific knowledge of how diluted bitumen behaves in water. Horgan has also pointed to perceived gaps in prevention efforts and response plans in the event of a spill.– With files from The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Study Women and minority TV directors make modest gains

first_imgLOS ANGELES, Calif. – Women and minority television directors made modest gains last season, but the majority of television episodes are still directed by white men, the Directors Guild of America found in a study released Tuesday.The guild’s study states that 62 per cent of nearly 4,500 television episodes reviewed during the 2016-2017 season were directed by white men. When adding in white female directors, 78 per cent of the television episodes reviewed were helmed by white directors.Non-white directors accounted for 22 per cent of all episodes directed last year, with black directors accounting for 13 per cent. Asian-Americans accounted for 5 per cent of the episodes directed, while Latinos represented 4 per cent.The numbers reflect low single-digit increases for female and minority directors from previous seasons: White women directed 16 per cent of episodes in 2016-2017 compared with 14 per cent, and minority females directed 5 per cent of episodes, up from 3 per cent in 2015-2016.Directors Guild President Thomas Schlamme wrote in a statement accompanying the report that the results show “stark disparities among the major studios that raise questions about how committed to inclusion some employers really are.”He said studios must do more to find directors from diverse backgrounds.“Frankly, it’s hard to understand why they’re not doing more,” Schlamme said. “Even if all the right reasons are not enough for them, they should at least be motivated by the bottom line — inclusion just makes good business sense.”The report also ranks studios and their subsidiaries on the racial and ethnic breakdown of its directors. The study found 20th Century Fox was the most inclusive studio, producing 553 episodes of content, with 55 per cent of episodes being directed by white men. CBS and NBC ranked second, while Netflix was last, with white men directing 77 per cent of the 88 episodes reviewed, and only 4.5 per cent of those jobs going to minority directors.ABC, which accounted for the most content with 614 episodes, ranked fifth out of 10 studios reviewed, with white men accounting for 64 per cent of the directors. Minority directors accounted for 23 per cent of ABC episodes, while female directors were in charge of 21 per cent.last_img read more

DavidsTea shareholders sue company founder seeking to have him removed

first_imgMONTREAL – The founder of DavidsTea Inc. is being sued by company shareholders seeking to have Herschel Segal removed as executive chairman and the election of a new board of directors.Three Highland Limited partnerships which together own 12.8 per cent of the Montreal-based beverage retailer’s shares filed suit in Quebec Superior Court against Segal and his investment firm Rainy Day Investments.Rainy Day Investments owns 46.4 per cent of DavidsTea shares.DavidsTea says the lawsuit is without merit and contains old, baseless allegations.Segal says in a statement that DavidsTea won’t be distracted by efforts to turn around the struggling retailer.The company, which is not named as a defendant, says it will defend against efforts that affect the election of directors or appointment of management.It says the new lawsuit seemingly replaces a similar motion filed before the June annual meeting that was later withdrawn.A slate of Rainy Day nominees were elected to the board and that resulted in the resignation of CEO Joel Silver, but two of those directors also later resigned.Segal has pledged that the chain of tea shops will become profitable within a year and focus on its Canadian roots.last_img read more

Crazy Rich Asians draws immigrant parents to the movies

first_imgWhen “Crazy Rich Asians” surpassed expectations and grabbed the top spot at the box office in its opening weekend, the film also pulled off another surprising feat: It put Asians of a certain age in theatre seats.Younger Asian-Americans have been flocking with their parents to see the first movie in 25 years with an all-Asian cast.For many older, first-generation Asian immigrants, going to the movies doesn’t rank high among hobbies and interests. The crowds, the language barrier and ticket prices are often turnoffs.But the appeal of “Crazy Rich Asians,” the story of a culture clash that erupts when an Asian-American woman from New York meets her boyfriend’s family in Singapore, has bridged a real-life generation gap.Earning more than $40 million since its Aug. 15 release, the film already has a sequel in development.An adaptation of Kevin Kwan’s bestselling novel, the rom-com is poised to hit the $100 million mark due to its popularity and a lack of strong competition in the next month, comScore senior media analyst Paul Dergarabedian said.“The over-performance of ‘Crazy Rich Asians’ shows the power of a great movie with universal themes to draw all audiences and also to break down preconceived notions of what can constitute a box office hit,” Dergarabedian said.Broken down by ethnicity, Asians made up nearly 40 per cent of the film’s audience during its opening weekend, Warner Bros said. By comparison, Asian/Pacific Islanders comprised just 10 per cent of the audience in the opening days of last year’s “Spider-Man: Homecoming,” according to an analysis done by comScore/Screen Engine’s PostTrak.The jump can be partly credited to enthusiastic Asian-Americans who wanted their parents to be part of what the film’s star, Constance Wu, has called a “movement.”Lie Shia Ong-Sintzel, 36, of Seattle talked her parents into coming along the second time she saw the movie. It was the first time in five years the couple — Chinese immigrants from Indonesia — had been to the cinema.“They don’t really go to movies in the theatre. I usually have to drag them,” Ong-Sintzel said. “I felt like this was a big occasion — a movie with an all-Asian cast.”Looking at her parents, she cried because everything from the acting to the food seemed to resonate more. She wasn’t the only one.“I looked over again, my dad was wiping tears from his eyes,” Ong-Sintzel said.In Temple City, California, Catherine Fanchiang, 27, who is Taiwanese-American, went to see the film a third time to keep her parents company.Fanchiang’s mother, Kao Han Fan, also wanted to see the movie because she recognized Michelle Yeoh, who plays a wary matriarch. But it was Wu’s character who touched the 64-year-old the most. Fan said she liked how the story depicted an “ABC,” (American-born Chinese) who showed Asian cultural values such as putting family first.“When you grow up in an Asian family … it will be in your mind when you do something, you will always think about other people,” Fan said. “You are not really, really selfish, thinking about yourself.”Fanchiang enjoyed watching her parents see an American film with Asians that wasn’t a period piece.“It was just a regular movie that just happens to have Asian people in it. It’s not like we’re ninjas or we’re good at fighting. It’s Asians existing in the modern world,” Fanchiang said.The stars and director Jon M. Chu have said they wanted the film to showcase Asians who weren’t stereotypes or little-used side-players.In the case of Alice Sue and her daughter, Audrey Sue-Matsumoto, the 67-year-old mother saw the movie first. She went a second time Thursday in the San Francisco Bay Area suburb of Daly City with her daughter. Sue, who is Chinese, doesn’t go to the movies much but knew she had to see this one.“It’s talking about Asian culture. It’s real Asians mixed with American-born Asians,” Sue said. “And I want to support the Asian movies.”Sue-Matsumoto, 35, said there probably wasn’t a more fitting film for the two to see together.“It was good to watch it with my mom because I feel like it was very relatable in our situation,” Sue-Matsumoto said. “She’s an immigrant, and I’m American-born. That movie has that generational distinction.”For Mark Gadia, 36, of Chula Vista, California, the movie led to him learning more about his parents’ courtship in the Philippines. His parents related to Wu and Henry Golding’s star-crossed couple because of how his mother was treated by her future in-laws.“She apparently wasn’t good enough for my dad. It took this movie to make this revelation of how they met,” Gadia said.He did not expect to come away having enjoyed seeing the film alongside his parents as much as he did.“As sappy as this sounds, it’s something I’ll always remember,” Gadia said. “It’s kind of sad it took 25 years, but I’m glad I had the opportunity to have this experience as an adult.”___Follow Terry Tang on Twitter at https://twitter.com/ttangAPlast_img read more

Most actively traded companies on the TSX

first_imgSome of the most active companies traded Thursday on the Toronto Stock Exchange:Toronto Stock Exchange (16,094.25, up 37.16 points).RNC Minerals. (TSX:RNX). Metals. Up 10.5 cents, or 60 per cent, to 28 cents on 54.2 million shares.Aurora Cannabis Inc. (TSX:ACB). Health care. Up 83 cents, or 10 per cent, to $9.09 on 30 million shares.Aphria Inc. (TSX:APH). Health care. Down nine cents, or 0.41 per cent, to $21.61 on 11.7 million shares.HEXO Corp. (TSX:HEXO). Health care. Up 71 cents, or 9.17 per cent, to $8.45 on 10.6 million shares.Orosur Mining Inc. (TSX:OMI). Base metals. Up one cent, or 13.3 per cent, to 8.5 cents on 6.3 million shares.Baytex Energy Corp. (TSX:BTE). Energy. Up 16 cents, or 4.6 per cent, to $3.65 on 6 million shares.Companies reporting major news:Canada Goose Holdings Inc. (TSX:GOOS). Consumer discretionary. Up $2.39 or 3.16 per cent to $77.98 on 356,000 shares traded. The luxury jacket maker is expanding its Winnipeg manufacturing operations by adding a third factory that will create about 700 jobs. The Manitoba government will spend up to $1.48 million to help the $15.8-million project.Hudson’s Bay Co. (TSX:HBC). Consumer discretionary. Down 20 cents to $10.58 on 607,000 shares. The retailer struck a deal to merge its German department stores with its biggest rival in the European market. The Toronto-based retailer, which owns Galeria Kaufhof, announced an agreement with Signa Retail Holdings, the Austrian-based brand behind Karstadt, a competitor department store in the market. HBC says the $616 million earned will be funnelled into reducing debt.BRP Inc. (TSX:DOO). Consumer discretionary. Down $5.98 or 8.4 per cent to $65.13 on 416,000 shares. The recreational products company was the biggest loser of the day on TSX after it launched a marketed secondary offering for 8.7 million shares by its largest shareholders — Beaudier Group and Bain Capital — as it also filed to list its shares on the Nasdaq Global Select Market.last_img read more

Swiss Chalet Harveys East Side Marios restaurant chain hit by malware outbreak

first_imgVAUGHAN, Ont. – Recipe Unlimited Corp. says some of its Swiss Chalet, Harvey’s, East Side Mario’s and other restaurants are experiencing a partial network outage after a malware outbreak.The company says it learned of the outbreak on Friday and as a precaution took a number of its systems offline and suspended internet access to affected locations.Some restaurants have been unable to process credit and debit card transactions as a result, though all of them can manually process credit card charges.A small number of restaurants have temporarily closed.The company says it’s continuing to work with security experts to resolve the situation.It did not immediately respond to a request for comment.Companies in this story: (TSX:RECP)last_img read more

Aphria names special committee to investigate allegations by shortsellers

first_imgLEAMINGTON, Ont. — Marijuana producer Aphria Inc. says its board of directors has appointed a special committee of independent directors to review the company’s acquisition of LATAM Holdings Inc., which has been criticized by short-sellers.The company says it remains confident in the deal, but in the face of what it called “inaccurate and misleading accusations” by the short-sellers it is undertaking the comprehensive review.Quintessential Capital Management and Hindenburg Research have alleged that the cannabis grower’s acquisition of assets in Colombia, Argentina and Jamaica totalling $280 million from Scythian Biosciences were “largely worthless.”The special committee includes John Herhalt, Shlomo Bibas and Tom Looney.Herhalt, who is the lead independent director and the head of the audit committee, will lead the special committee.Shares in the company, which plunged in the wake of the allegations, were up about 32 per cent or $1.63 at $6.63 in trading on the Toronto Stock Exchange today.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Ralph tops box office again Aquaman is a hit in China

first_imgNEW YORK — In the calm before the Christmas storm at the box office, “Ralph Breaks the Internet” remained No. 1 for the third straight week, while the upcoming DC Comics superhero film “Aquaman” arrived with a cannonball-sized splash in Chinese theatres.For the second week in a row, no new wide releases opened in North American theatres, allowing Disney’s animated sequel to again lead domestic ticket sales with $16.1 million, according to studio estimates Sunday.The top six films at the box office were all unchanged. Universal’s “The Grinch,” still a major draw in its fifth weekend, trailed in second with $15.2 million.But the weekend’s biggest new arrival was in China, where Warner Bros.’ “Aquaman” debuted with $93.6 million in ticket sales. That marked a new opening-weekend record for both Warner Bros. and DC in China. Considering the checkered recent history of DC films (“Justice League,” ”Suicide Squad”), the big launch in China was a promising sign for the spinoff starring Jason Momoa.“Adding to the success of ‘Wonder Woman,’ this is a really solid performance and portends big numbers for North America in two weeks when it opens,” said Paul Dergarabedian, senior media analyst for Comscore.He added: “That gives the film a lot of positive momentum. This is a movie, along with ‘Mary Poppins Returns’ and ‘Bumblebee’ and other movies, that’s going to give December that boost that a ‘Star Wars’ movie would give us.”“Aquaman” will expand to 40 international countries next week and arrive in North American theatres Dec. 21.“Aquaman” wasn’t the only big-budget holiday season release receiving a lift this week. Paramount’s “Transformers” prequel “Bumblebee” played a one-night sneak preview in 326 theatres nationwide ahead of its Dec. 21 release.Paramount declined to share ticket figures but domestic distribution chief Kyle Davies said theatres were mostly sold out. Perhaps more importantly, the film directed by Travis Knight and starring Hailee Steinfeld aided its word of mouth with largely glowing reviews — a rarity for the “Transformers” franchise.Disney’s “Mary Poppins Returns,” due out Dec. 19, also helped its cause with four Golden Globe nominations Thursday, including best picture, comedy or musical, and acting nods for Emily Blunt and Lin-Manuel Miranda.The feel-good interracial road trip period tale “Green Book” fared even better at the Globes (five nominations, including best picture, comedy or musical, and acting nods for Maheshala Ali and Viggo Mortensen) and had good results at the box office to show for it. In its fourth week of release, “Green Book” held with a rare 0 per cent drop, earning $3.9 million in 1,181 theatres. It has grossed $20 million in total.Yorgos Lanthimos’ comic period drama “The Favourite” continued to pick up steam. The acclaimed Fox Searchlight release, starring Olivia Colman, Emma Stone and Rachel Weisz, expanded into 91 theatres over the weekend to gross $1.4 million ($15,000 per theatre).A more traditional royal drama, “Mary Queen of Scots,” also opened strongly in limited release. The Focus Features title, starring Saoirse Ronan as Mary Stuart and Margot Robbie as Elizabeth I, debuted in four theatres with a robust $50,045 per-theatre average. Lis Bunnell, president of distribution for Focus, said the film’s modern spin “made it resonate with audiences in a powerful way paralleling so much of what is still going on today for women.”Also opening in limited release were “Ben Is Back,” the family addiction drama with Julia Roberts and Lucas Hedges (a $20,243 per-theatre average in four theatres), and the caustic pop music critique “Vox Lux,” with Natalie Portman (a $27,000 per-theatre average in six theatres).To commemorate the 25th anniversary of Steven Spielberg’s “Schindler’s List,” Universal re-released the Holocaust epic in 1,029 theatres. But it failed to turn out large crowds, grossing a modest $551,000.Next weekend, the box office is expected to be significantly busier with the release of “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse,” ”Once Upon a Deadpool” and Clint Eastwood’s “The Mule” and “Mortal Engines.”Estimated ticket sales for Friday through Sunday at U.S. and Canadian theatres, according to Comscore. Where available, the latest international numbers for Friday through Sunday are also included.1. “Ralph Breaks the Internet,” $16.1 million.2. “The Grinch,” $15.2 million.3. “Creed II,” $10.3 million.4. “Fantastic Beasts: Crimes of Grindelwald,” $6.8 million.5. “Bohemian Rhapsody,” $6 million.6. “Instant Family,” $5.6 million.7. “Green Book,” $3.9 million.8. “Robin Hood,” $3.6 million.9. “Possession of Hannah Grace,” $3.2 million.10. “Widows,” $3.1 million.___Follow AP Film Writer Jake Coyle on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/jakecoyleAPJake Coyle, The Associated Presslast_img read more

BC city to take Trans Mountain pipeline fight to Supreme Court of

first_imgCorrigan says the city has asked its legal counsel to file the appeal application within 60 days.He says in a news release that the Federal Court of Appeal did not give consideration to arguments made by Burnaby and the provincial government.The Federal Court of Appeal dismissed Burnaby’s application without reasons, but Corrigan says the judges should have explained why the provincial government was not being allowed to protect B.C.’s environmental interests.(THE CANADIAN PRESS) BURNABY, B.C. – The City of Burnaby is turning to Canada’s highest court in the dispute over construction of Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain pipeline.Mayor Derek Corrigan says the city intends to ask the Supreme Court of Canada to consider a lower court decision that denied Burnaby leave to appeal a ruling by the National Energy Board.That ruling allowed Kinder Morgan to bypass local bylaws during construction of the pipeline expansion, which will triple the amount of diluted bitumen and other oil products moving between the Edmonton-area and port facilities in Burnaby.last_img read more

FSJ Loves Family week starts today with event at Home Hardware

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Over thirty family-friendly events will be happening around the Energetic City starting Saturday, as the Family Friendly Coalition hosts FSJ Loves Families Week.The coalition, which is comprised of Success by 6, the Children First Initiative, and others are organizing the event, which goes from October 6th to 13th. The week will kick-off today in coordination with the Fort St. John Fire Department’s fire safety week.The Fort St. John Fire Department will host their event Saturday at Home Hardware that will include a smokehouse, bouncy slide, BBQ and fire trucks. For the rest of FSJ Loves Families week, all of the events are either completely free or incredibly low priced. A full list of events can be found here:last_img read more